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Best GPS for hiking & backpacking?


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Showing 1-5 of 5 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jul 23, 2011 8:51:48 PM PDT
gregornot says:
which is beat for these features-

Posted on Jul 23, 2011 8:56:26 PM PDT
gregornot says:
which can I add 24 k maps too...gregor

Posted on Jun 3, 2012 5:55:58 AM PDT
I'm looking for a GPS that I can use for hiking....more like finding my way back...but I have a specific need. I do plant and seed collecting on my treks and it's necessary for me to relocate specific spots weeks, months and years away to recheck and collect a specimen or seeds. I'd like to make a coordinate note at the location...on paper or in a notebook then be able to input those coordinates at a later date and use a 'go to' function to get back to the same location. The units I've tried so far make that very difficult unless you 'pin' the location which adds a level of complexity I don't want...just want to be able to enter the data and have the gps take me there from wherever I am.

Any suggestions? Have a PN 40 now and willing to move to another
unit if it'll work better for me.

Thanks

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 3:51:28 PM PDT
Jeremy D. says:
A. Messinger,

I use a Magellan eXplorist 500, which is pretty novel for geocaching, which requires finding items by coordinates, saving them, retrieving them, and navigating to coordinates listed by others. I would reccomend the Magellan eXplorist 110, which is the next generation of my model--I have used Magellan, Garmin, and factory brand GPS for hiking and for my vehicle and while many people will cite Garmin as the gold-standard, I've found them to occasionally be hard to imput and retrieve coordinates from them for my purposes. Also Magellan always prices about $100 lower for similar features/quality. Hiking GPS rarely include map updates, so if you're using street and landmark navigation from the built-in maps, expect to pay about $75-150 every 5 years to keep your maps updated or simply buy a new unit.

Magellan has tools for you to load and export coordinates once you've saved them with your unit. Since you may be looking for accuracy, the MOST a GPS will give you is 3 meters' accuracy--you can help increase this by ensuring you walk around your target and keep an eye on the signal and accuracy indicator. In dense tree cover, you may get as low as 17 meters' accuracy without an external antenna. If you are collecting and depositing seeds on solid ground and need a more exact method of finding them, depositing a semi-permanent object (such as a wooden/plastic/metal stake), burying an RFID tag, or simply using landmarks that are in the general area can give you a much more precise accuracy. Example: Oak tree at approximately lat=50.944297 lng=-91.11717, collection point is exactly 20.2 feet south (180 degrees) using a magnetic compass. Magellan eXplorist 110 Handheld GPS

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 8, 2013 1:03:57 PM PST
Leslie says:
Definitely the Amber Alert GPS device was made for you. You can create virtual zones, alerts you can set up to send to up to 10 people if your safety is compromised, two way voice, breadcrumbing etc. It's small, affordable and reliant. You can't go wrong. I am an outdoor enthusiast and have tested other devices and nothing compares. www.amberalertgps.com
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Discussion in:  GPS forum
Participants:  4
Total posts:  5
Initial post:  Jul 23, 2011
Latest post:  Feb 8, 2013

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