Customer Discussions > Green 3 forum

NOT green shipping


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-25 of 34 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jun 24, 2008 8:53:47 AM PDT
green girl says:
I placed an order that qualified for free shipping - super. I then found out that the package originated from a distribution center no more than 60 miles from its intended destination. It originated from an office in Richmond, CA, and after a nearly two week tour of the west, the package has arrived at the office responsible for delivery - the same one in Richmond, CA! In a time of astronomical gas prices and greenhouse emissions, how does a meaningless round trip qualify as Green?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 25, 2008 8:18:10 PM PDT
whirlwen says:
good for you for bringing this up. I have the same dilemma when making online purchases, concerned that what I purchase may be just 20 minutes away but have to loop across the country before it gets to me. our entire world can use some smart tech and innovation in e-commerce and delivery logistics!

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 26, 2008 7:28:21 AM PDT
I have absolutely the same concern. It's also disturbing when small items come in gigantic boxes. One company that I order from offers green shipping. TheGreenOffice.com has something called Climate Conscious Shipping and they actually offset the carbon footprint that's created during shipping. Plus, it's free when you spend $49 or more, which is great. These days, I try to buy things from local stores as much as possible, even if it means I have to walk to several different places or spend a little more on my purchases. I do hope the shipping technology would innovate.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 2, 2008 6:39:34 AM PDT
Junkie says:
I absolutely agree. With all the super high-tech systems that shipping companies use, you'd think that they would go that much further in cutting down costs for themselves and for the environment!

I hate it too when a lone DVD I've ordered from Amazon arrives in a huge box wrapped in layers of plastic and cardboard. There must be more efficient packaging techniques around!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 3, 2008 9:42:45 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 3, 2008 9:44:20 AM PDT
L. Roberson says:
Amazon tends to ship in packaging sufficient to cover and protect whatever is inside - you have to consider the importance of getting it to you in once piece. And while I'm not sure about the 3rd party vendors, when I track shipping from Amazon directly it tends to come along the shortest possible route - I've never had anything sent thru free standard shipping arrive in more than 3 days. If yours was a one time incident, try to keep it in perspective.

And try to remember that low cost or free shiping usually requires bulk shipments, which may not all have the same final destination - generally speaking they will start delivery at the furthest point and work their way back to the home warehouse.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2008 6:30:29 AM PDT
Andrew says:
Way too much packaging! I can't believe how much they use, we are now keeping our orders to a minimum because of it.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2008 2:05:25 PM PDT
I agree with you to some degree. Do keep in mind the stores are getting the stuff shipped to them as well. Plus the gas it takes to get to the store if you drive. Plus the AC and lighting and whatever else to power the store.

Either way, shipping could be more green friendly.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2008 11:16:56 PM PDT
I purchased E-cloths (great things) July 1. The package was sent out by the seller in California July 2. Since then it's gone to Detroit and Wyoming and it hopefully will arrive here in Seattle by the end of the estimated delivery window, July 7-10 (I'm posting this late July 9). Don't think this was the shortest possible route. It's not the first time I've had this happen. And I paid for shipping.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 14, 2008 7:46:39 PM PDT
Every extra mile that your package travels costs the shipping company money. They don't want to throw away money by driving your order all over the world, and you don't want them to ruin the environment that way. Just remember that you're not the only person on the face of the Earth, and that shipping companies minimize their costs (and their environmental impact) by grouping packages into larger shipments. These shipments virtually always take a less direct route than if they paid some guy to hop in his car and drive it straight to your house. Each package travels farther, but since the packages travel together, it's more efficient in the long run. It's kinda like taking a car-pool to work -- you might need to drive around a little extra to pick up your co-workers, but you're still keeping several other cars off the road.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 15, 2008 12:55:35 PM PDT
I agree to a certain extent. The thing for me ends up being that I do not have access to the things I am buying on here, organic and natural things are hard to find in the south. I justify it by being a member of the environmental protection agency, greenpeace and I recycle all of the packing materials, even the boxes the things come in. The best you can do in most cases is make an effort to offest you emissions.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2008 5:03:48 PM PDT
bookjunky says:
My big beef with Amazon is that I order things with free shipping - supposed to come in one shipment. what do they do? They break it into multiple shipments in order to "provide better service." Dude! Maybe my idea of better service is to MINIMIZE THE # OF BOXES!!! LOL What can you do? Maybe I will write directly to Amazon and suggest a "green" option on their shipping.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 18, 2008 10:12:45 AM PDT
P. J. Emery says:
No, I agree totally. I'm always unpleasantly surprised when I specifically check "as few shipments as possible" only to find that my items are still broken into individual shipments ... according to amazon, in the interest of getting the items to me "faster," which I don't really notice because I have Amazon Prime anyway. I wonder if this is more common with Am Prime, or if the $25 free shipping is equally problematic.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 20, 2008 2:11:20 AM PDT
OldAmazonian says:
Read the shipping labels and you may notice different points of origin. If all of Amazon was in one gigantic warehouse, shipping in a single carton would make sense. But it's not, and it sometimes doesn't.
Amazon shipping waste is small potatoes in the larger scheme of things. What really frosts my buns is the knowledge of the way General Motors and Standard Oil systematically dismantled excellent public tram systems across the US decades ago, replacing them with their infernal oil-sucking machines. My town is now spending obscene sums to partially re-create what was so crassly ruined a lifetime ago.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 20, 2008 11:40:17 AM PDT
Ecobunny says:
UPS will not take financial responsibility for an item damaged in transit if it is not surrounded by at least 3" of packing peanuts, bubbles, or styrofoam on all sides (they don't refund if crumpled/shredded paper is used). Or at least that's what they told me when I worked as the "shipper" at a retail store. So even though things are usually waaay overpackaged for what they go through, Amazon packs every item for the worst-case scenario.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 25, 2008 3:18:11 PM PDT
do it right says:
Even if UPS demands at least 3" of packing materials, the website says they use 100% recyclable airbags. But what cities easily recycles #4 plastic? Milwaukee doesn't. We have to throw it away. Yet a private reseller sent me her books wrapped in #2 air bags. So Amazon, I suggest you contact AIRplus by STOROpack, 1-800-827-7225 (West USA) or www.storopack.com for some #2 airbags.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 26, 2008 5:53:25 AM PDT
Hows this: if you are truly bothered by this, get on your bicycle and pedal to the mall. Retailers must protect the product they ship. Sorry they dont know your recycling guidelines. For me, I'll save my $4.00 gas, time and annoyance of "not in stock" by shopping on line.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2008 10:01:07 PM PDT
J. O Turkey says:
I agree with the plastics recycling problem. In Providence we can't recycle anything but #1 & 2. I think this is the way a lot of cities do things (on the east coast at least). I have a lot of plastic packaging bags that have the recycle symbol on them, but since they aren't # 1 or #2 I can't recycle them here, bummer as most of these are green products themselves....wish they would use biodegradable packaging as it is available and some companies use that instead. (off the shipping topic though)

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 30, 2008 10:58:59 PM PDT
Laryca says:
if you're buying books you should check out this website--recycled books, proceeds go to worldwide literacy programs, shipping is always free and always carbon neutral: http://www.betterworld.com/

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 30, 2008 11:01:23 PM PDT
Laryca says:
also check this out, there are ways to offset shipping and demand carbon-neutral: http://www.carbonfund.org/

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 16, 2008 11:52:47 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 12, 2008 10:29:43 PM PDT
Ryan Milani says:
Yeah I did a little investigating and actually Amazon is doing a pretty good job at reducing their footprint, and the US Postal Service is doing even better. Among other things, Amazon has "Earth Kaizen" projects, employee inspired innovation. USPS is already coming to your house 6 times a week, and their packaging is Cradle to Cradle certified, that's not easy to get. Glad people care out there.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 26, 2008 6:23:11 AM PDT
I find they often use far bigger boxes than necessary and even then, don't really pack well. I have ordered 100 pack DVD spindles several times, only to find they just toss them in a box with a couple of those air packs, which don't hold them in place. I open the box and find the spindles smashed and DVDs sprayed all over the place. I pack (the few) Amazon Marketplace items I sell much better. Would be nice if Amazon could cut down the waste and not damage merchandise at the same time!

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 10, 2008 7:27:47 AM PDT
Even if the Airpaks were #1 or #2, NYC won't recycle them because they're too thin to be cost effective. They only want #1 or #2 packaging like bottles and containers.

Amazon should use corn starch packing peanuts that just biodegrade when they touch water.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 12, 2008 12:21:02 PM PDT
Splendid says:
>>If yours was a one time incident, try to keep it in perspective.<<

one-time incident for one customer. multiple this by dozen, hundreds (or more) and you begin to see the true picture. thousands of over-sized boxes filled with unnecessary packing materials holding a single small item, traveling in circles.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 14, 2008 10:15:38 AM PDT
nativegirl says:
You are absolutly right & I am glad you brought this up. Be sure to check with your local food Co-Op. Most can get the item you are looking for through there list of distributors and you don't have to pay for shipping if they order it with there shipment. I just ordered a yoga dvd tht included AM&PM yoga for a cost of 19.00!!! Also be sure to check with friends if you are looking for something, I have found that most have something that I am looking for, not only was it free, or very low cost, but there was NO shipping!!!!
Namaste
nativegirl35

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 14, 2008 12:59:52 PM PDT
nativegirl says:
You are absolutly right & I am glad you brought this up. Be sure to check with your local food Co-Op. Most can get the item you are looking for through there list of distributors and you don't have to pay for shipping if they order it with there shipment. I just ordered a yoga dvd tht included AM&PM yoga for a cost of 19.00!!! Also be sure to check with friends if you are looking for something, I have found that most have something that I am looking for, not only was it free, or very low cost, but there was NO shipping!!!!
Namaste
nativegirl35
‹ Previous 1 2 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Green 3 forum
Participants:  31
Total posts:  34
Initial post:  Jun 24, 2008
Latest post:  Jan 4, 2013

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 7 customers

Search Customer Discussions