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How to stop eating three hourse before going to sleep?


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Posted on Nov 8, 2012 2:42:40 PM PST
Treehugger© says:
Im not going to rehash my pertinent posts regarding eating-a-meal-before-bed

feel free to go back and read all my posts

you just wrote 10 lines and all you said was "snack before bed is ok"

I have been consistent from the start unlike yourself.

Posted on Nov 8, 2012 2:44:21 PM PST
Treehugger© says:
spinoza wrote: "Why would you stop eating three hours before bedtime, what do you hope to accomplish by doing so, and where is the evidence that "this practice a big help for energy and fitness?"
I recently read a monograph purporting to show that eating or not eating several hours before bedtime has no effect on weight gain or weight loss.
Your body is going to digest your food the way it always does, whether or not you have recently eaten before bed. Some people just find it uncomfortable to eat before bedtime"
"If you're hungry before bedtime, have a little snack."

sounds contradictory to me

Posted on Nov 8, 2012 2:45:49 PM PST
Treehugger© says:
thats ok Spinoza, everyone makes mistakes. We are just human

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 2:51:44 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 8, 2012 2:52:24 PM PST
Spinoza says:
So, is it OK to eat a snack before bed or not, Treehugger? Yes or no will do. :-)

If yes, then you are being inconsistent.

If no, then you are being consistent.

It's that simple.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 3:03:20 PM PST
Treehugger© says:
I'm consistent, you are not.

Posted on Nov 8, 2012 3:06:28 PM PST
Treehugger© says:
I won't snack/eat, snack or eat within 2hrs of bed

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 2:12:06 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 9, 2012 2:27:32 AM PST
Spinoza says:
@Treehugger:

I have consistently stated that the crucial factor in weight loss is not the time of day food is consumed, but the net difference between calories consumed vs. calories burned.

The evidence that YOU have given yourself agrees with me:

"A large dinner may or may not hinder your weight loss efforts depending on how you eat the rest of the day."

Those are your words, not mine. YOU quoted them from the article. I didn't. I just requoted what you had quoted because you're obviously too stupid to read this and understand that it is agreeing with me, not you.

"Regardless of what time of day you eat, taking in more calories than your body burns will cause those extra calories to be stored as body fat."

http://www.livestrong.com/article/447717-is-a-big-dinner-ok-if-youre-trying-to-lose-weight/#ixzz2BWHQ8d

YOU quoted this originally, not me. I requoted it because it agrees with me, not you.

It's hardly surprising you're having difficulty losing weight or are overweight in the first place. You take anecdote and woo for medical fact, you refuse to exercise and burn more calories than you consume, and you think that you, as a layman, can figure all this out.

Do you know anything about digestion? Do you know how long it takes for food consumed at ANY time of day to become available as energy?

Do you really think that, if you eat a large breakfast, and then exercise immediately afterwards, or even a few hours afterwards, you are burning the energy from that meal?

It makes perfect sense NOT to eat before exercising. Eating before exercising diverts resources away from exercising and towards digestion.

If you don't eat before exercising, you are burning the glycogen stores in your body. When these are finished, your body then burns its fat.

The meal you just ate is the LAST thing your body burns as fuel.

Want to lose weight? Stop obsessing about the time of day food is eaten. Eat a balanced diet with a total caloric intake that is LESS than that which you burn off.

Then get your fat *ss in the gym for an hour a day, or jog, or walk a few miles, or run, or do aerobics, or some exercise that gets your heart rate up and makes use of your muscles (where the glycogen is stored).

You'll lose weight. I've been following this type of regimen for about 30 years and at 49, I'm 5' 10", 160 lbs, blood pressure 120/80, couldn't be healthier.

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 2:25:27 AM PST
Treehugger© says:
A large dinner may or may not hinder your weight loss efforts depending on how you eat the rest of the day.

yes and as I said before if you are hungry and depleted then you might eat a large dinner but avoiding that situation is prudent. Small meals are best. Going to bed with a full stomach is a bad idea and that's the way I live.

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 2:44:19 AM PST
Spinoza says:
""The most important goal for weight loss is to achieve a negative calorie balance. ... The focus is on calories," says Kristin Reimers, Ph.D., in her chapter on nutrition in the National Strength and Conditioning Association's "Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning."

http://www.livestrong.com/article/517056-does-it-matter-what-you-eat-if-you-just-count-calories/

"Recently, a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that calories are the final frontier in weight management.
I found this interesting, because it really has been what I privately thought for years. Yes, people lose weight with the South Beach Diet. Yes, they lose weight balancing fat calories. Yes, they lose weight eating a high-carb diet. But the key ingredient seems to be calorie control.

The study found "no differences in weight loss or the reduction of fat between four diets with different proportions of fat, carbohydrates and protein," according to an article in the Chicago Tribune. Instead it was "diet adherence" that made the difference in whether the participants were successful with losing weight."

http://www.fittothefinish.com/blog/2012/02/no-matter-what-you-do-its-the-calories-that-matter/

"If you are someone who refuses to eat after 8pm, you might be happy to know that eating late is not bad for your diet. Contrary to popular thought, spreading your calories out over the course of your day is better than cutting yourself off from food at a certain time. The time of day you eat any number of calories does not affect the rate at which they are metabolized by your body.

Calories In, Calories Out

Your weight variation is determined by the simple equation, number of calories you consume minus the number of calories you burn. The time of day you consume the calories has nothing to do with the equation. If you are eating the same number of calories for dinner, it doesn't matter if you eat dinner at 5pm or at 11pm; the number of calories does not metabolize differently.

Exceptions

If you want to avoid eating late at night because you eat additional calories, that is something else entirely. It is "bad" to eat late if you tend to engage in mindless eating while you are watching television, for example. Additionally, if you are a busy person who likes to stop at the drive-through for dinner late at night, instead of cooking, eating late might be bad for you too. The most important thing for your diet is to stay fueled with healthy food throughout the day (and night, if you are going to be awake).

Again, it doesn't matter what time of day you eat your calories, 300 calories will metabolize as 300 calories at any given time of the day. Researchers have found that people who break up their calories to keep their blood sugar levels even have more success when dieting. The most important thing about eating is what you eat, not what time you eat."

http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/fitness/weight-loss/is-eating-late-bad-for-your-diet.html

"Does what TIME you eat make a difference? There is debate and it does depend. If your primary goal is to lose weight then you have to burn more calories than you consume and it doesn't matter if it's light or dark out as long as this fact holds true. There isn't anything theoretically wrong with late night eating as long as it stays within your calorie deficit and it's a healthy body-using choice. If you're starved, go ahead and eat something healthy. Healthy foods aren't stored like sugar and fat filled foods. Even if it's late, have some fruit, veggies, even some chicken, tuna or other healthy snack with some water or tea. Just don't go rooting for the chips."

http://smashfit.com/blog/heather/blog-category/nutrifying/does-it-matter-what-time-you-eat

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 3:05:26 AM PST
Treehugger© says:
"The most important goal for weight loss is to achieve a negative calorie balance"

agreed

but if you go hungry intentionally through the day then your bodies metabolism will not be optimum. If you then eat a large dinner because you cant stand the hunger anymore then those calories will be more likely stored as fat and less available during the day.

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 4:08:44 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 9, 2012 4:12:10 AM PST
Spinoza says:
Treehugger© says:

"The most important goal for weight loss is to achieve a negative calorie balance"

agreed

but if you go hungry intentionally through the day then your bodies metabolism will not be optimum

Spinoza says:

Please explain or provide accepted medical references for the claim, "...but if you go hungry intentionally through the day, then your body's [sic] metabolism will not be optimum."

We've already agreed that it is caloric intake vs. calories burned that is the cause of weight loss or weight gain. THAT is not in doubt.

Saying that your metabolism is effected by when you eat contradicts "the most important goal for weight loss is to achieve a negative calorie balance." I'm sorry if you can't comprehend that. It still remains a fact.

WHEN you eat is unimportant. WHAT you eat, and HOW MUCH, and whether you burn off MORE than you consume IS.

So, IF you eat 2,000 calories per day, and you burn off 2,500 calories per day, and you do this every day, I can assure you that you will lose weight, and very rapidly, and you can calculate very precisely how much weight you will lose over a given period of time, AND enjoy the cardiovascular and muscle building benefits of exercise.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 4:45:52 AM PST
Treehugger© says:
You should know that if a person starves themself their body goes into survival mode and food will be stored as fat more readily when eaten.

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 4:48:35 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 9, 2012 5:00:17 AM PST
Treehugger© says:
Eating less than burned and cranking up the metabolism are 2 main points to weight loss. eating a large meal/end of the day, before bed hinders both points.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 12:19:36 PM PST
S. Kessler says:
On what do you base the recommendation for proportion of carbs, fat, and protein? Those are guesses at best.

Which low carb diets do you object to? The good ones emphasize complex carbs such as whole grains and fruits and vegetables. Even the ones that are often reviled, for no good reason, by the way, tell people to eat plenty of vegetables. Those are carbs.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 12:28:49 PM PST
S. Kessler says:
Spinoza, quoting selected "authorities" who agree with you is not way to win an argument. The science is in that weight loss is not a simple calculation of calories in versus calories out. Weight loss, and more important, maintenance, is much more complicated than that, with one's individual body chemistry and the quality of the calories taken in mattering a great deal.

That being said, I have no opinion on whether the eating large meals before bedtime has any affect of weight gain or loss. The only testable impact I am aware of is how a large meal before bedtime can result in acid reflux, which is really bad if you're prone to it. That's why I try to eat dinner early in the evening. If I need a bit of something before bedtime because I have that uncomfortable gnawing feeling, I will eat a small bit of cheese, a handful of nuts, or a square or two of good chocolate.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 12:32:48 PM PST
S. Kessler says:
The only real impact on weight that eating a large dinner before bedtime has to do with the scenario of not eating all day and then eating a huge meal before bed because you are ravenously hungry. What that will result in is a surge of insulin flooding one's bloodstream. Doing this regularly can lead to insulin resistance, resulting in excess glucose in the blood that can't be used by the cells for energy and is then stored in the fat cells.

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 12:36:48 PM PST
Treehugger© says:
There's a diet based on the 40-30-30 and the Balance Bar uses this ratio. It is widely accepted. I like it.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 12:39:04 PM PST
S. Kessler says:
I don't know what "widely accepted" means. Accepted by whom? "They"?

I prefer science, not received wisdom.

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 12:43:06 PM PST
Treehugger© says:
Fat in the diet is essential and helps maintain blood sugar levels. Low carb may be ok for some but the body needs carbs inthe long term. Too much protein can be toxic. Too little protein is harmful. The 40-30-30 is optimum ratio. To deviate from it is ok but the numbers are what we should lean towards.

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 12:47:55 PM PST
Treehugger© says:
Its balanced. Mosr people might not consider what a good balance is. Science determined what that is.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 12:54:29 PM PST
Treehugger© says:
If you google 40 30 30 you'll find the Zone Diet among other things. I looked into the ratio when Balance Bars came out in the early 90's.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 8:51:50 PM PST
S. Kessler says:
Can you cite scientific studies that back this up?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 8:52:54 PM PST
S. Kessler says:
Zone Diet? Balance Bars? What makes you think these are authoritative? Sounds like a marketing ploy to me.

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 9:03:45 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 9, 2012 9:04:59 PM PST
S. Kessler says:
I just looked at the Zone Diet website. What a huckster this Dr. Sears is, if there really is a Dr. Sears. This is nothing but a modified low carb diet (no rice, potatoes, white flour, etc.). Which is fine. But the web site seems to exist largely to sell nutritional supplements of dubious value.

As for Balance Bars, they are nothing but candy bars in disguise.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 11:13:24 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 9, 2012 11:30:37 PM PST
Treehugger© says:
Balance bars have protein, carbs and fat. You can't live on them but they are not candy. Candy is sugar last time I checked lol
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Discussion in:  Health forum
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Initial post:  Oct 29, 2012
Latest post:  Dec 19, 2012

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