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which is best Resveratrol product (not too expensive)?


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Posted on May 10, 2012 12:51:16 PM PDT
Here are the links to reports that mega-dose resveratrol is cell killing.
The 5000 mg study that induced kindey toxicity in humans is unpublished because the study was halted.
Please don't ask for human studies as they would be unethical.

Hormetic response of resveratrol against cardioprotection.
Juhasz B, Mukherjee S, Das DK.
Exp Clin Cardiol. 2010 Winter;15(4):e134-8.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21264071

MicroRNA signatures of resveratrol in the ischemic heart.
Mukhopadhyay P, Pacher P, Das DK.
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2011 Jan;1215:109-16.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21261648

Restoration of altered microRNA expression in the ischemic heart with resveratrol.
Mukhopadhyay P, Mukherjee S, Ahsan K, Bagchi A, Pacher P, Das DK.
PLoS One. 2010 Dec 23;5(12):e15705.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21203465

Dose-dependency of resveratrol in providing health benefits.
Mukherjee S, Dudley JI, Das DK.
Dose Response. 2010 Mar 18;8(4):478-500.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21191486

Commentary on 'resveratrol commonly displays hormesis: occurrence and biomedical significance' by Calabrese et al.
Das DK.
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2010 Dec;29(12):1016-7.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21115560

Effects of Longevinex (modified resveratrol) on cardioprotection and its mechanisms of action.
Mukherjee S, Ray D, Lekli I, Bak I, Tosaki A, Das DK.
Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2010 Nov;88(11):1017-25.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21076489

Posted on May 10, 2012 12:56:45 PM PDT
Your'e a curious novice.
The mouse study you cite slightly shortened the lives of normal-calorie-fed mice.
The human equivalent of 365 and 1565 mg of resveratrol was employed.
Because mice have about 4-fold less blood concentration of resveratrol than humans,
there were no reported side effects. You would not want to use these doses in humans.

Posted on May 10, 2012 1:16:15 PM PDT
Ryan Huyck says:
My goodness man, you do not stop.

"The 5000 mg study that induced kindey toxicity in humans is unpublished because the study was halted" in short that's conspiracy BS unless you have a reputable source to back you up.

Your references also are supporting my stance, showing resveratrol's benefits in the in vivo heart. The "in vitro" heart perfusions though are unrealistic good or bad.

How about some more references?

Resveratrol improves renal microcirculation, protects the tubular epithelium, and prolongs survival in a mouse model of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury.
Kidney Int. 2012 Feb;81(4):370-8
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21975863

High urinary levels of resveratrol metabolites are associated with a reduction in the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in high-risk patients
Pharmacol Res. 2012 Jun;65(6):615-620
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22465220

Resveratrol protects left ventricle by increasing adenylate kinase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities in rats with myocardial infarction
Chin J Physiol. 2011 Dec 31;54(6):406-12.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22229508

Resveratrol attenuates doxorubicin-induced cardiomyocyte death via inhibition of p70 S6 kinase 1-mediated autophagy
J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2012 Apr;341(1):183-95.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22209892

Resveratrol Improves Cardiac Contractility following Trauma-Hemorrhage by Modulating Sirt1
Mol Med. 2012 Mar 27;18(1):209-14
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22113495

Calorie restriction and resveratrol in cardiovascular health and disease
Biochim Biophys Acta. 2011 Nov;1812(11):1477-89.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21749920

Resveratrol ameliorates aging-related metabolic phenotypes by inhibiting cAMP phosphodiesterases
Cell. 2012 Feb 3;148(3):421-33.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22304913

Resveratrol, a neuroprotective supplement for Alzheimer's disease
Curr Pharm Des. 2012;18(1):27-33.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22211686

Autophagy, polyphenols and healthy ageing.
Ageing Res Rev. 2012 Apr 6
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22504405

Resveratrol inhibits paraquat-induced oxidative stress and fibrogenic response by activating the Nrf2 pathway.
J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2012 Apr 4
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22493042

In vitro and in vivo evaluation of resveratrol and 3,5-dihydroxy-4'-acetoxy-trans-stilbene in the treatment of human prostate carcinoma and melanoma
J Surg Res. 2012 Mar 28.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22482756

And so many many more. I could go on all day showing your false interpretations and the data clearly showing the benefits of higher levels of resveratrol. Are we done here?

Posted on May 10, 2012 1:19:50 PM PDT
well, most of this is certainly beyond me but i appreciate the knowledgeable responses (even if completely contradicting each other!!)

william, could you please tell me which safe product your company sells and how much transrevesterol it has?

To the other helpful poster: Revgenetics looks interesting, but probably a bit too expensive as the other poster says.

I am having a hard time finding details on how much trans rev is really in some of these brands. One poster elsewhere said that the brand I listed at the beginning of this thread doesn't really have as much trans rev as they suggest in their advertisement.

Anyone more informed than I care to do a bit of research on a couple of brands that 1) have enough trans rev 2) are at around $30 a month? Also,, should I go ahead and return the brand that I just ordered from Amazon? I have really tried to research but ... just completely confused at this point. I think this info should help a lot of people. Thanks to everyone.

In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2012 1:20:01 PM PDT
Ryan Huyck says:
"The mouse study you cite slightly shortened the lives of normal-calorie-fed mice."

Absolutely false! Have you read the study? Look at Figure 4 of the paper. Here you clearly see resveratrol having little impact on life span (though resveratrol dosed miced lived -longer than controls-). Resveratrol most prominently increased the maximum life span of mice on high calorie diets (fat mice), however. But no where did resveratrol decrease life spans, and did not significantly increase them either.

In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2012 1:26:57 PM PDT
Ryan Huyck says:
To Joseph,

You're right that you need to make sure the product clearly states the amount of trans-resveratrol. Also notice that William has a vested bias in what you buy; do not trust what he says too seriously, but do take a product recommendation from him into consideration (if he gives one).

Here is what I've been using NOW Foods Natural Resveratrol, Mega Potency, 200mg, 120 Vcaps . It's an extract, and not purified however, but good enough for me. 1000 mg Resveratrol Premium from Life Smart Labs, Resveratrol Juice Extreme Ultra this one claims to be "pure", but can't say for sure without an independent review; still it also looks promising and better than the NOW I have.

Finally, this is a buccal delivery one Twinlab Resveratrol Max Dots, 60 ct (melts in your mouth). It only has 22 mg of trans-resveratrol, but due to the higher absorption without modification by taking it this way, it is rather potent. It is a extract blend however, but one you could consider.

Those are some reasonable ones I see here on Amazon. Using the guidelines given in this thread will be useful wherever you look. I hope this helps you!

Posted on May 10, 2012 1:29:17 PM PDT
Here is the reference for the 5000 mg human dose that was toxic to the kidneys
http://www.myelomabeacon.com/news/2010/11/30/glaxosmithkline-halts-all-further-development-of-resveratrol-drug-srt501/

Posted on May 10, 2012 1:31:12 PM PDT
What did you have for breakast this AM, confusion flakes?
You say.......
Your references also are supporting my stance, showing resveratrol's benefits in the in vivo heart. The "in vitro" heart perfusions though are unrealistic good or bad.

Look, the studies I sent you were used in the excised animal heart, not in vitro, not in a lab dish.

Posted on May 10, 2012 1:33:30 PM PDT
Yes, I see the reference you pulled out of your rabbit hat regarding resveratrol being kidney-protective.
However, the data is mixed on this.
Hence, you should be cautious about saying 1000 mg is perfectly safe in humans.
In a rodent it may be semi-safe, but humans develop 4-fold greater blood levels than rodents with the same dose.

In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2012 1:35:43 PM PDT
Look, just send me privately you name and shipping address and I will send you a complimentary sample to try.
I'm trying not to advertise a commercial product here and get thrown off the message board.
bsardi@aol.com

In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2012 1:38:07 PM PDT
Now you are looking at the prior study performed on high-fat fed mice where resveratrol did prolong lifespan, but not in normal-calorie fed mice (later study). You surmise that high dose is OK from that mouse study, but then why did it not work in mice fed a normal diet? Are you saying ONLY MEGA DOSE worked?

Posted on May 10, 2012 1:39:07 PM PDT
Ryan Huyck says:
William, that isn't resveratrol, that's SRT501, a modified -derivative- of resveratrol. That's been kicking around for awhile, as they made claims it was better than resveratrol due to their proprietary changes to it and other formulations (the formulation includes ip6 and other compounds which are dubious). That has nothing to do with resveratrol itself, but their crazy scheme which any reputable person already knew was hazardous based on the other components. I don't know if that's a reputable source you have sited, but it doesn't surprise me; the ip6 alone was dangerous to the kidneys, and especially at such a high dose!

Yes, the studies you have used the EXCISED animal heart, that's why I put "in vitro" in quotes. They aren't in vivo, that is no longer in a living body. The hearts are isolated and hit with all sorts of unnatural conditions at rates that are impossible in a living organism. That is why you cannot trust such results other than a starting place to begin in vivo studies. And what have the in vivo studies shown? Incredible protection of the heart in humans and mice by resveratrol. The previous study I cited showed that resveratrol at 204 mg/kg/day to mice basically stopped all aging of the heart, all aging markers were gone other than time to relaxation; and the aortas showed lower cell death than the controls had even at their prime. That was all in -living- whole animals. Notice my other references and you'll begin to see the bigger picture.

Posted on May 10, 2012 1:42:26 PM PDT
Here is an asbstract of a study which indicates polyphenols like resveratrol can be potentially cell killing (cytotoxic)

Toxicology. 2002 Aug 1;177(1):67-80.
Plant phenolic antioxidant and prooxidant activities: phenolics-induced oxidative damage mediated by metals in plants.
Sakihama Y, Cohen MF, Grace SC, Yamasaki H.
Source

Laboratory of Cell and Functional Biology, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan.
Abstract

Plant phenolic compounds such as flavonoids and lignin precursors are important constituents of the human diet. These dietary phytophenolics have been recognized largely as beneficial antioxidants that can scavenge harmful active oxygen species including O(2)(.-), H(2)O(2), .OH, and (1)O(2). Here we review our current understanding of the antioxidant and prooxidant actions of phenolics in plant cells. In plant systems, phytophenolics can act as antioxidants by donating electrons to guaiacol-type peroxidases (GuPXs) for the detoxification of H(2)O(2) produced under stress conditions. As a result of such enzymatic as well as non-enzymatic antioxidant reactions, phenoxyl radicals are formed as the primary oxidized products. Until recently, phenoxyl radicals had been difficult to detect by static electron spin resonance (ESR) because they rapidly change to non-radical products. Application of Zn exerts spin-stabilizing effects on phenoxyl radicals that enables us to analyze the formation and decay kinetics of the radicals. The ESR signals of phenoxyl radicals are eliminated by monodehydroascorbate radical (MDA) reductase, suggesting that phenoxyl radicals, like the ascorbate radical, are enzymatically recycled to parent phenolics. Thus, phenolics in plant cells can form an antioxidant system equivalent to that of ascorbate. In contrast to their antioxidant activity, phytophenolics also have the potential to act as prooxidants under certain conditions. For example, flavonoids and dihydroxycinnamic acids can nick DNA via the production of radicals in the presence of Cu and O(2). Phenoxyl radicals can also initiate lipid peroxidation. Recently, Al, Zn, Ca, Mg and Cd have been found to stimulate phenoxyl radical-induced lipid peroxidation. We discuss the mechanism of phenoxyl radical prooxidant activity in terms of lifetime prolongation by spin-stabilizing agents.

PMID: 12126796

In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2012 1:42:34 PM PDT
Ryan Huyck says:
"In a rodent it may be semi-safe, but humans develop 4-fold greater blood levels than rodents with the same dose. "

That is why we do "human equivalent" dosing. That is already factored in and not an issue. Did you see my previous papers on the pharmacokinetics for resvertrol from mice, to dogs, to humans? There is not an appreciable difference, there is no 4-fold greater blood level in humans. It is still about 1% of what you take. In fact, humans have a LOWER bioavailability of orally ingested resvertrol than mice.

I don't know where you are pulling your ideas from, but they are completely unsupported by the literature, as I have cited repeatedly.

In short, I have no more time to spend speaking to you about this if you are unwilling to do the reading yourself. You are sending us in circles, and I have actual science to do. So, good day.

(Again, I warn people. He is connected to a company selling a resveratrol product, and thus as a vested interest in controlling what you know about it. He may just be misguided, but take that into account)

Posted on May 10, 2012 1:48:43 PM PDT
This is the label of the product Ryan Hyuck takes (Amazon doesn't provide a supplement facts panel):
Polygonum cuspidatum Extract (Root)
(50% Natural Trans-Resveratrol - 200 mg) 400 mg *
Red Wine Extract (Alcohol-Free)
(vitis vinifera) (min. 30% Polyphenols) 10 mg
What you are getting here is 50% of 400 mg, or 200 mg, but you also get emodin from the Giant Knotweed (Polygonum)
source. Emodin induces strong diarrhea effects among many people.
Ryan is buying on price, as this product has not undergone ANY testing in animals or humans.
He is relying on borrowed science.

Posted on May 10, 2012 1:57:02 PM PDT
Get this, Ryan Hyuck says "don't trust the other guy" then lists a product, Premium Resveratrol (the second links he provides) which appears to be a photo-copied label applied to a bottle from an undisclosed manufacturer, a product only sold on ebay, amazon, etc, and there is absolutely no supplement facts panel provided to examine from any of these sources. So you have no idea what you are getting.
-- Bill Sardi

Posted on May 10, 2012 1:59:28 PM PDT
Ryan you are not looking at the most recent paper. You are looking at pharmacodynamic studies, not the most recent study showing 4-fold increase in humans over rodents in blood concentration.

Posted on May 10, 2012 2:03:42 PM PDT
OldAmazonian says:
Rodents too might be better off with a glass of red wine.

Posted on May 10, 2012 2:04:08 PM PDT
Ryan, you are trying to win an argument instead of helping people here.
SRT501 is micronized resveratrol from a botanical source with an emulsifier, that is all.
You aren't familiar with this.
The product you demean, which I am commercially involved with, is not "dubious" as you claim.
It is the best tested product. The ones you have decided to use are without any scientific evidence
of their safety or effectiveness. Take not readers!

In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2012 2:07:27 PM PDT
OldAmazonian says:
Take not readers? What harm will it cause readers?

In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2012 2:27:40 PM PDT
I am trying to stay away from becoming a commercial here. There are (hopefully) many products that are accurately labelled. The resveratrol product I am involved with has no measured toxicity at very high dose, unlike plain resveratrol. This is due to the way it is made and co-factors provided. But I recommend the public find a good brand of resveratrol that meets their pocketbook requirements, regardless of brand. If you want assured quality, then search for products with published animal and human studies. Here are some studies to analyze for one brand:

1. Modified resveratrol Longevinex improves endothelial function in adults with metabolic syndrome receiving standard treatment.
Fujitaka K, Otani H, Jo F, Jo H, Nomura E, Iwasaki M, Nishikawa M, Iwasaka T, Das DK.
Nutr Res. 2011 Nov;31(11):842-7.
PMID:2211875
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/221187555

2.Modulation of miroRNA 20b with resveratrol and longevinex is linked with their potent anti-angiogenic action in the ischemic myocardium and synergestic effects of resveratrol and ã-tocotrienol.
Mukhopadhyay P, Das S, Gorbunov N, Ahsan MK, Otani H, Pacher P, Das DK.
J Cell Mol Med. 2011 Nov 3. doi: 10.1111/j.1582-4934.2011.01480.x. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID:22050707
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22050707

3.Hormetic response of resveratrol against cardioprotection.
Juhasz B, Mukherjee S, Das DK.
Exp Clin Cardiol. 2010 Winter;15(4):e134-8.
PMID:21264071
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21264071

4.Restoration of altered microRNA expression in the ischemic heart with resveratrol.
Mukhopadhyay P, Mukherjee S, Ahsan K, Bagchi A, Pacher P, Das DK.
PLoS One. 2010 Dec 23;5(12):e15705.
PMID: 21203465
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21203465

5.Effects of Longevinex (modified resveratrol) on cardioprotection and its mechanisms of action.
Mukherjee S, Ray D, Lekli I, Bak I, Tosaki A, Das DK.
Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2010 Nov;88(11):1017-25.
PMID:21076489
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21052791

6.Reduction of blood cholesterol and ischemic injury in the hypercholesteromic rabbits with modified resveratrol, longevinex. [corrected]
Juhasz B, Das DK, Kertesz A, Juhasz A, Gesztelyi R, Varga B.
Mol Cell Biochem. 2011 Feb;348(1-2):199-203. Epub 2010 Nov 4. Erratum in: Mol Cell Biochem. 2011 Feb;348(1-2):205. Juhaz, Bela [corrected to Juhasz, Bela].
PMID:21052791
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21052791

7. Short-term consumption of a resveratrol-containing nutraceutical mixture mimics gene expression of long-term caloric restriction in mouse heart.
Barger JL, Kayo T, Pugh TD, Prolla TA, Weindruch R.
Exp Gerontol. 2008 Sep;43(9):859-66. Epub 2008 Jul 9.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18657603

Posted on May 10, 2012 5:36:52 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 10, 2012 5:38:35 PM PDT
ParrotSlave says:
You might find the Longecity forums interesting. They have numerous discussions about resveratrol, and also include actual scientific information instead of stuff from Altair or beyond; this particular Amazon forum is unusually low in that sort of thing so far. Longecity is devoted to "advocacy and research for unlimited lifespans," so you should be aware that the, shall we call it "client mix," is not representative of the population at large. But I find the arguments there to be relevant. See http://www.longecity.org/forum/forum/312-resveratrol/. One discussion is of the possibility that it might promote cancer (yes, cancer cells also react to nutrients; by mentioning this, I am not taking a position on the issue, so, please, no inferences: it is merely an intellectually valid question), as well as discussions that probe such concepts as, if one were going to consume it, one might very well want to consume whatever dose avoids "off-target effects."

Posted on May 10, 2012 7:22:57 PM PDT
I am editor of a site specifically for resveratrol news, www.resveratrolnews.com

Longecity is like all the other blog sites, full of misinformation like we see here when dumb-headed bloggers mislead the uninformed but eager to learn masses. It is no wonder the public doesn't take resveratrol pills, there is so much misinformation.

In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2012 8:35:20 PM PDT
Captain says:
"I'm so confused by all the opinions on the internet!"

Gosh, I wonder why. Worst thread ever.

In any event, you really don't need it, so don't waste your money.
Your reply to Captain's post:
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In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2012 9:39:16 PM PDT
Dani K says:
Try Pure Encapsulations - they consistently put out good products: Resveratrol Extra 120c by Pure Encapsulations

If you are looking for resveratrol combos, RVB300 from Restart Your Life is good.

As a rule of thumb, Pure Encapsulations, Standard Process, Thorne and Transfer Point offer high quality products. We ask our friends in the medical research community for supplements company referals when we need one; we keep coming up with the 4 i mentioned. You'll probably be most comfortable if you do the same kind of research.

Unfortunately, supplement manufacturers are not regulated by the FDA and there are a lot of low quality manufacturers out there. I personally wouldn't trust the company you bought for - seems a bit too flashy and there is no need to put down competition.

I would also trust Mr. Huyck over Mr. Sardi. Mr. Huyck's arguments sound like arguments from a scientist. And I think in this instance that is who will give you the most informed advice.

Lastly, there are studies that show that marathon runners and firemen had more energy after taking resveratrol.
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Discussion in:  Health forum
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Initial post:  May 9, 2012
Latest post:  8 days ago

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