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Staying fit and lean: tips, recipes, and encouragement


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Showing 1-25 of 62 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Dec 30, 2009 2:30:19 PM PST
After reading many of the posts on "Why are American's still struggling with obesity", it seemed like everyone agreed that a major problem was nutritional education. So, since I love to see people succeed and overcome obstacles, I thought I'd start a forum where people can post healthy recipes, snack alternatives, exercise ideas, encouragement, etc.

Posted on Dec 30, 2009 2:34:48 PM PST
So, even though I started this discussion, I'll make the first post. Just got done making bread rolls for dinner. I prefer to bake my own, and if I'm busy, I'll do all my baking and cooking on one day, perhaps over the weekend. When I make bread, I add a fair amount of soy flour which is high in protein. Protein turns off the hunger center in the brain whereas refined bread actually makes you hungry by spiking your blood sugar, causing your body to produce too much insulin leading to low blood sugar and increased hunger. And obviously, adding fresh flax seed, wheat germ and using whole wheat flour helps curb hunger by adding fiber.

Another great snack: oven roasted chickpeas. My family loves these! Boil chickpeas until soft (takes forever--an hour and a half!) then bake them at 350 until they are crunchy. When they are done, spray them lightly with non-stick cooking spray and sprinkle seasoning (we like cajun seasoning--but watch for the msg. Msg increases appetites.). Yum!

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 30, 2009 2:59:15 PM PST
I love chickpeas! Can you do it with canned?

Love the thread idea!

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 30, 2009 3:20:19 PM PST
I don't know. Try it and let us know :)

Posted on Dec 30, 2009 3:47:42 PM PST
abbyful says:
I've never struggled with weight, I'm the same weight now at 26 that I was at 16. But in recent years, I've become more interested in eating well.

Time and time again, all the information I could find was what had less calories, not what to eat based on ingredients. But finally I found books by Michael Pollan, Nina Planck, and Weston Price. Those were exactly what I was looking for.

I avoid pre-packaged and overly-processed food whenever possible.
My grocery cart each week consists of real food such as:
- fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables (I try to avoid canned foods)
- dry beans, whole grains (brown rice, quinoa, etc.), and whole-wheat pastas
- fish and meat, no additives (chicken often has added salt-water or broth!), organic when I can afford it
- free-range eggs
- organic whole-milk (I want to eventually switch to raw milk)

I use traditional fats/oils, non-hydrogenated: olive oil, butter, coconut oil
I avoid things like margarine, soybean oil, vegetable oil, anything that says "refined oil" or "hydrogenated".

I also only eat fermented soy, like tofu. Unfermented soy is actually an anti-nutrient, traditional asian cultures figured this out, which is why they eat it fermented.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 30, 2009 3:55:35 PM PST
What is raw milk? And I agree, I am most interested in nutrition. Our body is a machine. If we neglect it, it'll start to wear down--quicker. Wow, didn't know about the unfermented soy. I eat alot of soy! I would love to hear more about that!

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 30, 2009 4:08:19 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Jan 4, 2010 12:54:48 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 30, 2009 4:09:08 PM PST
abbyful says:
Raw milk is directly from the cow. Not pasteurized and homogenized. I've actually never drank raw cow's milk, nor do I know where to find it even (don't know any farmers where I live now), but I grew up on a farm and we had freshly milked goat's milk from time to time.

Here's some info on fermented versus unfermented soy:
http://www.naturalnews.com/025513.html
http://www.mothering.com/food/whole-soy-story

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 30, 2009 6:29:50 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Feb 16, 2010 3:59:16 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 30, 2009 7:02:45 PM PST
Wow. And after reading the post about soy had geust's for dinner and served my soy flour rolls. Although I did mention that I had just read a post that they were not as good as I had thought. I will definitely have to look into that as I use soy flour alot. Any suggestions on how to up the protein of my bread? I've used walnut flour, but that is difficult to work with.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 30, 2009 7:12:54 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Feb 16, 2010 3:59:23 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 31, 2009 12:24:26 AM PST
B.NASH says:
First jennifer check out the book MUSCLE CHOW by Gregg Avedon.This cook book will give you healthy recipes with little to no sodium. Cutting out the excessive sodium found in processed foods will be a step in the right direction. As far as excercise you have to find something thats right for you. Whether thats running,hiking,biking,aerobics,weight training etc etc. Start slow and gradually build up your intensity and number of days you work out. Dont overwhelm yourself. Hope this helps.

Posted on Dec 31, 2009 2:20:20 AM PST
Sue says:
Abby, I believe tofu is not fermented.

Not sure if I agree that we are eating too much protein. If anything, I think we are eating too many carbohydrates.

Elana's Pantry has got some great gluten free recipes. She uses almond flour for most of her recipes.
I think you're better off removing grains from your diet or if you must eat them atleast prepare them right by soaking.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 31, 2009 8:04:10 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Jan 4, 2010 12:54:47 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 31, 2009 8:21:53 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 31, 2009 8:24:16 AM PST
abbyful says:
Sorry I should have written that clearer, Sue.
I buy fermented tofu, it's little different than regular tofu, it comes in cubes in a jar. (It may come in other forms too, I don't eat a lot of tofu to begin with, and have only purchased it a few times.) I buy it at an asian grocery store, as my regular grocery store doesn't have it.

Posted on Dec 31, 2009 9:33:46 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Feb 16, 2010 3:59:16 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 31, 2009 9:38:54 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Jan 4, 2010 12:54:46 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 31, 2009 9:48:33 AM PST
Sandwich? Is that really you? You're losing your touch man.....hope thats Kelly being an imposter again......

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 31, 2009 9:49:42 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Jan 4, 2010 12:54:46 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 31, 2009 9:58:52 AM PST
Last I heard she was visiting those same dark alleys she always loved at 2am in the morning, only this time she was selling stuff instead of buying it....

I told her she shoulda just robbed those people blind. Poor Kelly....dead in the prime....errr...worst part...uhh....? Ummm....well....she lived....a....life...

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 31, 2009 11:42:55 AM PST
Oregongirl says:
Well actually I saw who made the post and then only skimmed it to see if it was funny. It was doable, certainly not one of your better ones...

I'll give it 3 stars.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 31, 2009 11:44:43 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Feb 16, 2010 3:58:19 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 31, 2009 11:51:49 AM PST
Oregongirl says:
This may not be a popular idea but most people honestly don't know when to quit eating. Espcially if I'm eating lunch out. I HATE wasting food yet don't usually want to bring home a 3/4 eaten sandwich. So either I eat all my food or pass it on to someone else who doesn't need the extra calories either.

I have to remind myself that throwing away good food is OK, and so is finding a lunch buddy to share it with. I will sometimes pass on lunch out as I don't need the extra calories. A bowl of soup and some cheese and crackers do me just fine on a cold day if I'm stuck at my desk all day. In the summer, a bowl of fruit and a yogurt do the trick just fine. Most people just eat too much. It's easy to do.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 31, 2009 12:00:00 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Jan 4, 2010 12:54:45 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 31, 2009 12:02:13 PM PST
For me, I actually need to make sure I get enough sodium. I cook my own food and don't eat processed, drink tons of water and have suffered from sweating all my electrolytes out--when I train, I lose a lot of water and a lot of salt. You can tell if you've lost a lot of salt if you get a white film on your skin after exercising.
http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/nutrition/qa-hot-weather-salt-loss---how-should-i-cope/627.html

I think that could be why nutrition can be so confusing for so many people. Your nutrition really depends on what you do. For me, as a distance runner and triathlete, I need more protein than some might. They say it is best to eat protein within an hour of exercising. This prevents injury by allowing your muscles to rebuild/repair and strengthen. And because I can easily burn up to 2,000 calories in one work-out, I need ALOT of food. Just eating veggies for me doesn't cut it. Which is why I eat so many nuts--a wide variety of nuts. But with my appetite, I can still eat nuts, grains, veggies, etc.

And actually, I am happy with my weight, health and nutrition. having a coach for a father, and having done sports since I was six, and spending a great deal of my time reading running and tri magazines, I know what I need to eat and do (for the most part) for my training. This post was started to encourage others and share what I have learned over the years. But thanks for the encouragement. :)
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Health forum
Participants:  14
Total posts:  62
Initial post:  Dec 30, 2009
Latest post:  Jan 9, 2010

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