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Hindu diet


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Showing 1-16 of 16 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jun 2, 2009 1:11:22 PM PDT
montessori says:
How difficult is it to follow a Hindu diet? What about the diet or your beliefs makes it worth it to you? What are some of the situations that make following the diet difficult?

Posted on Jun 27, 2009 3:39:14 PM PDT
It is more difficult the more you know about food. If you avoid obvious meat and eggs, it's easy. But eggs, meat juices, and insect products are in many things. It is well worth it. I feel much cleaner. The most difficult situations I think are baked goods because many contain eggs. Sometimes I cheat.

Posted on Jul 5, 2009 9:17:20 PM PDT
Which Hindu Diet ? The Hindu diet varies according to caste and sub culture and physical location.

Posted on Jul 24, 2009 2:08:14 PM PDT
Yes I am a hindu brahmin so may be I can help answer the question. There are four castes among Hindu's. Brahmins (traditionally priests), Kshatriya (traditionally warriors), Vaishya (traditionally business people) and Shudra (traditionally help and service providers). Brahmins and Vaishyas are the ones who are pure vegetarian whereas Kshatriya (because they have to be strong to fight wars) and Shudras (because the scriptures do not put too many restrictions on them) are allowed to eat non-vegetarian food. However the general recommendation of Hinduism is that unless you are a soldier by profession you should be pure vegetarian.

I have managed to remain a pure vegetarian and it gives me great peace of mind and inner strength. It also helps me make good spiritual progress. It is not true that you cannot manage without non vegetarian food. I have lived and worked in four different countries, India, Japan, Sweden and now in US. I have been easily able to remain a vegetarian. It does take some control to do so. But it can be done and it is totally worth it.

Besides the spiritual aspect even from health perspective vegetarian food is best.

Posted on Jul 31, 2009 5:38:23 PM PDT
Agni Vayu says:
The four are not castes but Varna. Casta is a Portuguese/Spanish word that refers to the racial (based on race and skin color) hierarchy found in South/Central America. I personally have done work that could be considered of all four Varna's. The British used caste in India initially to refer to half castes like Anglo-Indian (White and Indian mixed). Later they used it as propaganda to attack Hinduism as part of their divide and rule regime.

As far as needing meat to fight, that's misinformation.
I am a military pilot and a 100% Vegetarian (No eggs or meat, including in baked goods).
Tofu is a good source of protein, but my personal favorite is actually Chick Peas (Garbanzo beans or Chana)
Getting 50-60 gm of Protein a day is very easy with some Beans, Chick Peas, Whole Grain (Just one slice of Whole Wheat bread has 2-3 gm), Pasta, Milk and Nuts/Almonds. You can take Protein shakes or bars, but it's not required. I run and life weights and better shape than most meat-eaters.
BTW, Happycow.net has vegetarian/ vegan restaurants around the world.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 31, 2009 7:32:56 PM PDT
AV: The four are not castes but Varna. Casta is a Portuguese/Spanish word that refers to the racial (based on race and skin color) hierarchy found in South/Central America. I personally have done work that could be considered of all four Varna's.

ST: Absolutely. It is not a Indian word nor does it come from English. Varna only refers to gunas of the person - nature and tendencies, and karma or the actions preferred and performed.

Bhagavad Gita 17.8 describes that the highest form (satvic) of food should contribute towards increasing longevity, mental clarity, strength, health, pleasing in taste and appearance.

Apart from the principle of non-injury, and health concerns, eating meat is also supposed to contribute heavily to global warming.
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/27/weekinreview/27bittman.html
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/sep/07/food.foodanddrink

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 27, 2009 12:21:39 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Nov 23, 2010 6:57:06 PM PST
Ray Kaye says:
Aug. 27, 2009 12:21 AM PDT

It's difficult when we in the west drive by a fast food restaurant and the fat and the onions are frying in the stove! It's difficult when, for the whole of your life meat in all forms, (kielbasa for me) has been plated up on a regular basis! But then again, after several days of veggies and fruits, if a neighbour starts sizzling the fat-burger on his Bar-B-Que.....and you start thinking of a squealing cow, then it smells horrible....but yes....life is difficult. Quitting smoking was easier!!

UPDATE OVER A YEAR LATER:

After being at my Hindu Temple and eating Temple food nearly every day, I find it hard to even eat in an Indian restaurant. ( Most of those are not really representative of Indian food anyway.)

I do, however, love both garlic and onions, and strict Temple policy forbids those items. As an American, I find these restrictions odd, as one can not bring leather foot-wear into the Temple proper, however no one makes you leave your purse or you wallet and belts at the door.

Old habits die very, very slowly.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 16, 2010 6:38:53 PM PST
Tushar Oza says:
One of my students posted the following:

In the Atharvaveda (vedic text) beef-eating was prohibited as it was likened to committing a sin against one's ancestors.

Many Indians believe in what is called Mindful Eating. In this system, meats are classified as spent energy, along with over-eating and over-ripe food and these foods are discouraged as they believe they do not contribute to the whole being, which includes the mind, body and soul.

Atharvaveda also classified foods into sattvic, rajasic and tamasic taking the philosophy of vegetarianism many steps further.

Sattvic, rajasic, and tamasic are known as Gunas, the three qualities of energy, that exist together in equilibrium. The Gunas are found in all beings and objects surrounding us. Here is how they apply to food.

Sattvic Food: This is the purest diet, the most suitable one for any serious student of yoga. It nourishes the body and maintains it in a peaceful state. And it calms and purifies the mind, enabling it to function at its maximum potential.A sattvic diet thus leads to true health: a peaceful mind in control of a fit body, with a balanced flow of energy between them. Sattvic foods include cereals, wholemeal bread, fresh fruit and vegetables, pure fruit juices, milk, butter and cheese, legumes, nuts, seeds, sprouted seeds, honey, and herb teas.

Rajasic Food: Foods that are very hot, bitter, sour, dry, or salty are rajasic. They destroy the mind-body equilibrium, feeding the body at the expense of the mind. Too much rajasic food will overstimulate the body and excite the passions, making the mind restless and uncontrollable. Rajasic foods include hot substances, such as sharp spices or strong herbs, stimulants, like coffee and tea, fish, eggs, salt and chocolate. Eating in a hurry is also considered rajasic.

Tamasic Food: A tamasic diet benefits neither the mind nor the body. Prana, or energy, is withdrawn, powers of reasoning become clouded and a sense of inertia sets in. The body's resistance to disease is destroyed and the mind filled with dark emotions, such as anger and greed. Tamasic items include meat, alcohol, tobacco, onions, garlic, fermented foods, such as vinegar, and stale or overripe substances. Overeating is also regarded as tamasic.

Posted on Jun 16, 2010 8:43:38 PM PDT
Amicus says:
Tushar Oza wrote:
Tamasic Food: A tamasic diet benefits neither the mind nor the body. Prana, or energy, is withdrawn, powers of reasoning become clouded and a sense of inertia sets in. The body's resistance to disease is destroyed and the mind filled with dark emotions, such as anger and greed. Tamasic items include meat, alcohol, tobacco, ONIONS, GARLIC, FERMENTED FOODS, SUCH AS VINEGAR, and stale or overripe substances. Overeating is also regarded as tamasic.
***

Your whole post was interesting, but the last part surprised me. Garlic is such a beneficial herb. It seems to have an anti-cancer effect. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100301131905.htm
Likewise, some fermented foods (like miso, a fermented soy product that makes an excellent vegetarian soup base) seem to be wholesome for the body. www.thefamilyhomestead.com/fermentedfoods.htm

Interestingly, cheese is listed as a sattvic food, although cheese is fermented.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 16, 2010 8:47:08 PM PDT
Amicus says:
I wonder if anyone here uses a Vegan cookbook that is good enough to recommend?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 16, 2010 8:59:26 PM PDT
Ray Kaye says:
Namaste~ Yes, there are many...if you are looking for Indian cooking, the Jaffry's are good, the "New Indian Home Cooking", by Gadia, "The Classic 1000 Indian Recipes", by Hobson. Try also looking at some "Ayurvedic" cookbooks. You may also wish to look on the internet and sign up with two really great sites, "Show Me The Curry" and Sadhana Ginde at indianfood@bellaonline.com, all good friends and will assist you personally.

Bon Appitite

Posted on Jul 28, 2010 6:39:21 AM PDT
Amicus says:
This is wonderful:

How to make Paneer by Manjula, Indian Vegetarian Cooking
www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gkor7dW6DU

She also has a website with lots of clear simple videos for Indian cooking. Fun to watch.

Posted on Nov 23, 2010 6:12:25 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Nov 23, 2010 6:13:37 PM PST]

Posted on Feb 5, 2012 4:33:33 AM PST
aruna says:
I've just written a 4-part series about Hindu diet on my blog, www.sadhanadaybyday.blogspot.com. You're welcome to check it out.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 1, 2012 11:56:21 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Jul 15, 2016 2:40:05 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 1, 2012 12:55:23 PM PDT
Ray Kaye says:
For what?
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Discussion in:  Hinduism forum
Participants:  12
Total posts:  16
Initial post:  Jun 2, 2009
Latest post:  Apr 1, 2012

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