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Historical Fiction WWII


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In reply to an earlier post on Jun 16, 2014 5:39:43 AM PDT
snapdragon says:
Please read my book 'Lois Chronicles of a German Nurse 1945' -- it is a women's tale encompassing all the psychological impact being on the losing side. Even if you only read the free portion on Amazon or Smashwords I would very much be interested on your impression of my book

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 16, 2014 5:34:58 AM PDT
snapdragon says:
I think you ought to include my book written from a German women's point of view, at the close of World War II, when chaos reigned supreme. All their held social values and ideologies were about to be trampled into the horrendous maelstrom of contradiction. My book 'Lois Chronicles of a German Nurse 1945' is unique because it focuses on the every day aspect of survival as the Russian army conquers Saxony.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2014 9:30:17 PM PDT
Johnmacmot says:
This might fit the bill for you M.J., because it's really the story of Malta's history as told by the Kapillan, framed by the story of the Siege.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 8, 2014 3:31:01 PM PDT
Selene: That one sounds like one I'd like. I'll try to get it. We Visited Malta a few years ago, and I've been looking for something more about it. Thank you for posting that one. M.J. Brett

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 8, 2014 1:55:17 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 8, 2014 1:55:42 PM PDT
Selene says:
A lesser-known Monsarrat novel, but well-worth a read, is the The Kappillan of Malta, set during the 2-year-long Siege of Malta from 1940-2

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 6, 2014 8:07:36 PM PDT
Evetstx says:
Check out new novel "GALEON" by S. M. Dyer - here on Amazon - awesome story!

Posted on Jan 24, 2013 2:14:33 PM PST
WW2 Reviews says:
The Katyn Order: A Novel

The German War Machine retreats as the Russians advance. In Warsaw, Resistance fighters rise up against the Nazi occupiers. But the Germans retaliate ruthlessly, leveling this once-proud city. Natalia, a young Polish freedom fighter who has lost everything, and Adam, an American covert agent meet during the chaos of the Warsaw Rising. Together they discover a secret about one of history's most notorious war crimes.

The Library Journal said, " THE KATYN ORDER'S compelling authenticity and evocative detail will captivate history buffs and thriller fans alike.'

Booklist said, "THE KATYN ORDER is a galvanizing mix of war novel and espionage thriller. Don't miss this one!"

Posted on Jan 24, 2013 2:13:45 PM PST
WW2 Reviews says:
The Katyn Order: A Novel

The German War Machine retreats as the Russians advance. In Warsaw, Resistance fighters rise up against the Nazi occupiers. But the Germans retaliate ruthlessly, leveling this once-proud city. Natalia, a young Polish freedom fighter who has lost everything, and Adam, an American covert agent meet during the chaos of the Warsaw Rising. Together they discover a secret about one of history's most notorious war crimes.

The Library Journal said, " THE KATYN ORDER'S compelling authenticity and evocative detail will captivate history buffs and thriller fans alike.'

Booklist said, "THE KATYN ORDER is a galvanizing mix of war novel and espionage thriller. Don't miss this one!"

Posted on Dec 30, 2012 6:12:24 PM PST
Leslie Ariel says:
Transatlantic Lives

Hi there. Transatlantic Lives, my father's recently published book, is a literary memoir that might just fit the bill. The book tells the twin stories of him, a Jewish American GI, and my mother, a stylish Jewish French woman, growing up in separate cultures, each of their worlds populated with their respective cast of characters against the common backdrop of the pre-WWII era. They meet in Biarritz, France at war's end, he a heroic member of a liberating armed force, she a Holocaust survivor understandably well-disposed towards Americans. The book is composed of 2-3 page vignettes and is told in a piercing snapshot style, that makes it feel more like fiction than fact, although the stories and characters are real, just the names changed.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012 3:52:43 PM PST
Barbara, I'm glad to find another author who wanted to portray the normal German citizen. That's what I was trying to do with my debut novel, "Mutti's War." It seems that we Americans had no idea what ordinary life was like under a dictator. Let's hope we never have to find out. Margaret...M.J. Brett

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012 3:50:35 PM PST
That sounds interesting, Darla. My personal favorite is, and always has been "The Wall," by John Hersey. It's good to find a new author with that skill as well.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012 7:44:11 AM PST
A new novel was just released on December 24th... The Plum Tree by Ellen Marie Wiseman. I loved it. It told about a family and their struggles and a German girl and her love of a Jewish boy! Really good book by a new Author.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 27, 2012 3:54:39 PM PST
Barbara says:
Definitely check out the debut novel The Plum Tree, by Ellen Marie Wiseman. It is a well-written story about what happened to German citizens, primarily women, children and the elderly, during Hitler's reign of terror. Its a side of that reality not often discussed but should be.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 5, 2012 7:41:22 PM PST
1gudriter says:
You might look into "The Rope Catcher." It is a brand new novel about a Navajo code talker during the WWII era. Battles are a small part of the book; it is really about what happens when the young man returns home and struggles to reconcile his recent achievements with the dismal realities of life back on the reservation.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 22, 2012 11:37:17 AM PST
Jacob's Courage"The Winds of War" is one of my all-time favorite books. Same with "War & Remembrance." They inspired me to write my Holocaust novel, "Jacob's Courage."

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 6, 2012 11:48:52 AM PST
Petunia888 says:
What is your book about Lisa?

Posted on Mar 30, 2012 3:28:33 PM PDT
MimiG says:
Mimi G says I just finished The Zoo Station and the 3 sequels by David Downing. I loved them and have preordered the next book of series.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 11:33:13 AM PDT
Hi Leonardo: California will always be in our hearts...and I certainly had fun writing those. I guess when it stops being fun, I'll stop writing, but that has never happened yet. smile. Margaret (a.k.a. M.J.Brett)

Posted on Mar 30, 2012 11:17:41 AM PDT
Bill Flynn says:
Lecture on Cape Cod at Barstable old court house for www.talesofcapecod.org based on book A DRUMBEAT TO NEAR, a WW ll novel when German U-boats lurked of Cape Cod...May 14th @ 7:30

Posted on Mar 30, 2012 10:53:50 AM PDT
Hi Blue Harmony,

Sounds like a really interesting book. I'm from L.A. and even though I'm not physically in Cali right now, my heart certainly is.

Leonardo Noto

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 10:08:37 AM PDT
Sebe: I, too, grew up in California and remember thinking more about the Pacific war than the Atlantic. We really expected invasion and most decisions were based on that possibility--first aid classes (I practiced bandaging on my doll), gas gongs on the porch, little pumping buckets for incinderary bombs, camoflaged aircraft factories, and making pads to sit on in the hall for air raid drills at school. I danced for the USO and bond drives during the war, and most all the troops there were headed to the Pacific. It was "expected" that everyone would do their part. Later on, when I taught in Germany during the Cold War, I discovered much of the information and interviews that went into my European WWII novel, "Mutti's War," where "I Think I Can, I Think I Can" dealt with the Pacific experience of being a kid in a war that perhaps we children didn't completely understand. Moral of the story, we had a totally different mindset on the Pacific Coast than we did on the Atlantic Coast, and that makes for widely different historical novels. We all write what we know. Isn't that great? Margaret...M.J.Brett

Posted on Mar 30, 2012 7:25:57 AM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Apr 1, 2012 4:36:48 AM PDT]

Posted on Mar 29, 2012 5:39:08 PM PDT
Sebe says:
It is interesting that most books mentioned here are about the war in Europe, and I do remember the day in '39 it started. But being a Californian, VE day seemed not a terribly big deal unless you had someone personally involved. We had really expected the possibility of invasion and the young men that we had contact with were all mainly headed for the So. Pacific, so our thoughts were "ok that's good, now they can concentrate where we need it". August '45 was the truly great day.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 29, 2012 1:27:26 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 29, 2012 1:28:16 PM PDT
Happyone says:
Robbin's War of the Rats covers some of the same story

Posted on Mar 29, 2012 1:05:39 PM PDT
This is a little bit off topic, but the movie, "Enemy at the Gates," is a fantastic WWII story that I thought was fictional when I first saw it -- turns out that it's actually a true story about two snipers hunting each other during The Battle of Stalingrad. I'm sure that the book is evening better than the movie, though I haven't read it personally. Check it out if you haven't seen the movie, it's a real treat.

Leonardo Noto
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Discussion in:  Historical Fiction forum
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Initial post:  May 18, 2008
Latest post:  Jun 16, 2014

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