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Hitler's mistakes

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In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 2:15:06 PM PST
Susanna,
re: "Manos: Hands of Fate".---
Not even MST could get me to sit through that. IMHO-the absolute WORST. Talk to y'all guys and gals tomorrow. I hope.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 2:11:39 PM PST
F. Gleaves,
re: Forbidden Planet/The Tempest---
I have often read of "Forbidden Planet"'s origins lying in "The Tempest". I just finished watching, again, "The Thing" two nights ago. One of my all time favorites.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 2:06:30 PM PST
F. Gleaves says:
My favorite from those days was 'Forbidden Planet' featuring "Robby the Robot", Walter Pidgeon, Leslie Nielson and the unforgettable Anne Francis as 'Altaira'.

An interesting idea behind the plot, which some compared to Shakespeare's "The Tempest".

My black & white fave was "The Thing".

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 1:53:47 PM PST
Susanna says:
Steelers Fan, everytime I see your name I think of this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewSS9h3pEAU

I realize it happened a few years ago, but I only discovered it last fall, and now I'm a believer.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 1:53:19 PM PST
IGS says:
"I'd figure at least two or three Legions would be required to match them."

2 or 3 legions to match 24,000 zulus ... maybe. Probably would not have required that though. Those legionary shields, big, strong thick, greaves and gladius or, worse yet, the ones with lōrīca segmentāta. Pilum to remove the shield from the Zulu ... The legion had formations with no flanks. I'd put my money with the legionaries. Interesting factoid, the average legionary was a small man between 5'1"- 5'6", with 5'6" being on the big side. Here the rub, the weight 180 lbs, all muscle. C'mon Shaka, come and get some sugar, LOL. The Zulu were wonderful soldiers. They could march 50 miles in a day. But history is full of great soldiers. Those legionaries held an empire together for a millenia.

Legionaries were not ambushed often, despite attempts beyond counting. In the pre-gunpowder age, I take the legions (and perhaps the Byzantine cataphracts) over anybody. Once you get to powder, Frederick's Prussians, and Napoleons men, with particular attention to the Vieille Garde who were never defeated in battle in 20 years of war.

But once you get to the rifle bore era, it becomes a very different animal.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 1:51:49 PM PST
Susanna says:
I haven't seen any of those. I did see MST spoof "Manos: Hands of Fate," possibly the worst movie ever. I have to get a hold of some of those; what an insta-cure for stress or depression.

On other threads, some posters have speculated Speilberg and Lana were the same poster; this idea was reinforced when the posts of both were deleted. We as posters cannot get anyone banned despite what some people think. It is Amazon that makes that decision. If enough people hit the "report abuse"--and I bet enough did--Amazon will investigate and then decide. It is their forum and they set the rules...Amazon is actually moderated a lot less than many other forums I have seen.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 1:51:03 PM PST
Steelers fan,
re: Killer Shrews---
The poor mutts had a fake set of double saber tooth tiger fangs and what looks like what the gals call hair extensions. They all looked quite mangy.

Posted on Feb 13, 2013 1:40:39 PM PST
Steelers fan says:
RE The Killer Shrews

They weren't "shrews" at all. They were dogs with extra appendages applied to their noses. Low-budget stuff.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 1:17:38 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 13, 2013 1:32:01 PM PST
F. Gleaves says:
IGS,

Remember that the Zulus fielded 24,000 warriors against the British at Isandhlwana, suffering 2000 casualties from the 1000 riflemen before closing and annihilating them.

And this was no more than half the total Zulu strength. I'd figure at least two or three Legions would be required to match them.

And that's if they didn't ambush the Legions, which might well have been the case. The first British to spot the approach of the Zulus at Isandhlwana were amazed to see an entre army suddenly appear out of the brush. They could also cover fifty miles in a day.

Rorke's drift was something of a special case, the compound being made into a little fortress.

The Boer wagon laager, much like a circled Pioneer wagon train, was an adequate defense and typical Roman fortified camps should have done as well, and they never broke a British Infantry Square.

Unfortunately the British line at Lsandhlwana was too far from the ammo, and there was a problem getting the ammo crates open.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 1:16:26 PM PST
Susanna,
re: "Spielberg aka Lana"---
I don't understand what you mean by "Spielberg aka Lana". Were they one and the same as in vespasian/Jim? Was it a typo? How does one go about banning another? Not that I would do something like that.
re: "MST 3000"---
I have spent some good money buying some those old 50's bombs from MST 3000. The latest were "Killer Shrews-1959", "Attack of the Giant Leeches-1959" and "Teenagers from Outer Space-1959". These Z-grade movies are so are made so much more enjoyable given the treatment by Joel/Mike and the 'bots. They never did "The Giant Claw" but it is hilarious on its own. The crappiest "monster" and F/X ever.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 12:36:25 PM PST
Susanna says:
Les, you met the great John Lane?? :)

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 12:28:40 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 13, 2013 12:30:03 PM PST
Susanna says:
Paul, I just read your review of Mystery Science Theater. LOVED them!!

This actually made me cry from laughing so hard:

Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Final Sacrifice

Fifteen five star reviews, one four star.

Posted on Feb 13, 2013 12:16:56 PM PST
Susanna says:
Spielberg aka Lana got banned all by himself. I don't believe any of you read the garbage he spewed on some of the other threads, but he was vulgar and abusive.

Good riddance.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 12:13:28 PM PST
Susanna says:
Speer always appears to drift on the outside of Hitler's circle, even though Hitler was purported to adore him. On film at least, he gives off an aura of being uninvoved, interested only in his architecture, floating quietly around Hitler's inner group of thugs. He seems almost un Nazi like, at least in terms of the atrocities.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 12:08:01 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 13, 2013 12:15:47 PM PST
Susanna says:
Hi Paul, yes I am. Thanks for asking.:) I haven't been able to catch up with all the posts though, but I'm working on it. I had no clue about many of the things you discuss, so it's slow going--and I have to pause sometimes to google as needed.

Last Saturday night "The Fly" with *Vincent Price*was on, and I thought about the cheesy movie lovers here.

*That's Vincent "every line I say ends with 'My dear, my dear" Price.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 11:45:13 AM PST
F. Gleaves says:
Paul,
The big difference was that for many years the British claimed no aircraft were lost on September 1, the day Marseille claimed 17 fighters for himself of 26 claimed for his squadron. However, I see that 22 of the kills have been confirmed. Overall, 70% of Marseille's claims have been confirmed, a pretty typical ratio.
FG

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 11:03:49 AM PST
F. Gleaves,
re: "doubt concerning Marseilles' claims in Africa"---
In the relatively little I've read about the Luftwaffe, the one pilot whose kill claims seem to have been dismissed by Western sources was Marseilles. However, maybe as he gained fame as the scourge of the RAF, he wounded Western sensitivities. These sources said nothing about the monstrous kill claims in the East.
Something I've wondered about is how Hitler or the General Staff was so magnanimous in the medals and print they bestowed on the "Star of Africa" while at the same time begrudging in their consideration on Kurt Knispel the "Knight without a Night's Cross" (who I've seen is being discussed elsewhere on this site). Both led a "bohemian" lifestyle and both were somewhat averse to military discipline, but one's accomplishments was the equal of the other's.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 9:33:34 AM PST
vespasian says:
igs thans for your thoughts. I agree with that as well..vesp

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 9:33:34 AM PST
vespasian says:
igs thans for your thoughts. I agree with that as well..vesp

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 8:12:26 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 13, 2013 8:14:46 AM PST
IGS says:
vesp.

His tactics had value but would have failed against a deeply trained enemy. He would have had the floor mopped with a legion of Romans with their Equites. And to demonstrate what those tactics came to in the end, two words "Rorke's Drift". His tactics, his mindset, his execution. The only thing missing. Him. But it showed the inherent flaw of his way of thinking.

As far as warriors that arose out of Africa, only two need concern you Hamilcar Barca and his legendary brother Hannibal. Hannibal is on the A-list of the top 5 greatest generals in history, sharing the list with others such as Napoleon, Alexander, Gaius Julius, and perhaps Scipio and Temuchin. But Shaka, I rather think of him like I do any of the Gaulic tribes that Caesar was wiping out 2000 years ago. Rather like a really good buggy whip manufacturer today.

I think of him rather like Gall or Red Cloud, good soldiers but simply long past value.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 6:45:03 AM PST
F. Gleaves says:
vesp,
Shaka Zulu was a great, innovative commander - for Any time or place. His tactics still proved very effective against the British at Isandhlwana in 1879 when they failed to make proper defensive preparations - having left their Gatling guns behind at the base camp. Same mistake as Custer.

Astute use of concealment and the double envelopement combined with exceptionally fast movement and unsurpassed courage made them a dangerous opponent for any army.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 5:21:59 AM PST
vespasian says:
The one guy that no one seems to know about ( even Irving) is Hans Kammler. Other than his title, etc he seems to slide into obscurity..vesp

Posted on Feb 13, 2013 5:13:46 AM PST
vespasian says:
let me make this clear. if my accussal of Rachel realtive to getting people off the site, Im sorry because I was wrong if she didnt do it. Everything else Ive said in response to her is true..vesp

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 5:09:49 AM PST
vespasian says:
paul, I dont have a direct connect to Rachel. And if Im wrong, I apologize. But someones backchecking on it, sooo. but if im wrong im sorry...vesp

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 13, 2013 5:07:45 AM PST
vespasian says:
IGS So what do you people think of the tactics of Shaka Zulu--for its time and place,,,vesp
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Discussion in:  History forum
Participants:  166
Total posts:  10000
Initial post:  Feb 1, 2012
Latest post:  Feb 13, 2013

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