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When do Centuries Begin? On the "00" or the "01"?


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Showing 26-50 of 61 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Oct 25, 2012 3:40:52 PM PDT
it exists in my enumeration

sorry you use and erroneous and misleading method

Posted on Oct 25, 2012 8:44:25 PM PDT
Yog-Sothoth says:
A century ends with the digits 00.

For instance, the "First Century" starts with year "1", and ends at the END of the year "100. Century = 100 years.
20th Century = 200) years, so AFTER 2000 years are COMPLETE, the century ENDS on 31 Dec 2000, and the next Century starts the following day, 1/1/2001.

Saying this year is "2012" is actually stating "this is CURRENTLY the 2,012th year since the [proported] birth of Christ" - but won't be completely the 2,012th year until Dec 31. On January 1st 2013, it will NOT be 2,013 years since the birth of Christ, but rather only 2,012 years - plus one day.
A baby who is 14 months old is said to be "one year old" but is CURRENTLY in its "2nd year".

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 25, 2012 8:50:43 PM PDT
a century and decade start with 00 on the end

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 25, 2012 9:18:05 PM PDT
D. Thomas says:
andthehorsethatshatonyourhead? wrote: "apl programming language had an option to start counting things from 0 or 1 to allow for nitwits"

That's the only intelligent thing you've ever posted.

What was the date of Jesus' conception, and why don't we celebrate it?

Sensible historians and scientists are now using "BP" - Before Present - instead of that ridiculous BC / AD business, which is based on mythology.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 25, 2012 9:21:04 PM PDT
D. Thomas says:
sorry you use and and and instead of an and and

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 25, 2012 10:06:43 PM PDT
WolfPup says:
How on Earth did someone vote you down after you spent that much time cleanly explaining it?

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 25, 2012 10:28:40 PM PDT
jpl says:
This is correct.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 26, 2012 7:59:04 AM PDT
we only celebrate births

conceptions do not always result in people

bc/ad is not mythology

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 26, 2012 7:59:35 AM PDT
sorry my arthritis causes typos that really bother you

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 26, 2012 8:00:18 AM PDT
only in your erroneous method

all mathematicians have a 0 between -1 and +1

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 26, 2012 11:54:50 AM PDT
WolfPup says:
It's mythology except in the sense that these were terms that were used.

Posted on Oct 29, 2012 8:05:41 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 29, 2012 8:10:35 PM PDT
Yog-Sothoth says:
D.Thomas: "Sensible historians and scientists are now using "BP" - Before Present"

I can see a point...up to a point. "Pearl Harbor Day" could be said to have happened "Dec 7th, 61 BP"; the Battle of Hastings occured 14 Oct, 946 BP. (At least that's what they are NOW - next year they would be 62 BP and 947 BP, respectively.
That would suck, having to get a new Driver's License every year, because your birthday would change every year ( mine: 8/11/1954): "Aug 11, 58 BP", next year it will be "Aug 11, 59 BP"
I suppose future dates could be abbreviated "AP" (after present): "The next total solar eclipse visible in the US will be on 21 Aug 5 AP"

How does one denote the current year? Just say, "current year"??? "this year"???

If years are to be enumerated - and there's no way we could function otherwise - there MUST be a refernce point to start from. Does it really matter if that is based on a factual or mythic event? As long a all agree on the date, it really doesn't matter. "C.E." and "B.C.E." are "non-religious" references used to denote dates, but are still based upon the "popularly accepted" "mythical event".

Decades, centuries, and millenia START with the year ending in "1" and END on the last day of the year ending in "0".

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 29, 2012 9:12:49 PM PDT
nutz

they all start on zero and end on 9

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 30, 2012 6:44:54 AM PDT
anne says:
thehorse: <nobody in the usa has a 13th floor>

anne: Really? Not one building over 12 floors has a 13th floor? How can everyone who numbers floors in a country as huge as the U.S. be superstitious? Or is one superstitious person the person in charge of numbering all the floors in buildings built in the U.S.?

Posted on Oct 30, 2012 7:20:51 AM PDT
Palladin55 says:
1st Century AD 1 - AD 100
2nd Century 101 - 200
3rd Century 201 - 300
20th Century 1901 - 2000
21st Century 2001 - 2100

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 30, 2012 8:07:54 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 30, 2012 8:12:42 AM PDT
wrong

what year is between ad1 and bc1 ??

the zeroth century was from year 0000 to 0099

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 30, 2012 8:09:32 AM PDT
WolfPup says:
Beaaaaaause....?

Posted on Oct 30, 2012 8:34:41 AM PDT
Palladin55 says:
"what year is between ad1 and bc1 ??"

I took the following quote from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anno_Domini
"This calendar era is based on the traditionally reckoned year of the conception or birth of Jesus of Nazareth, with AD counting years after the start of this epoch, and BC denoting years before the start of the epoch. There is no year zero in this scheme, so the year AD 1 immediately follows the year 1 BC. This dating system was devised in 525, but was not widely used until after 800."

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 30, 2012 9:55:13 AM PDT
and it is totally illogical

makes it hard to count elapsed years between dates
and has no way to reference year zero that no longer exists

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 30, 2012 10:13:27 AM PDT
WolfPup says:
When you count carrots, do you hold up the first carrot and say, "I have zero carrots!"?

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 30, 2012 10:22:26 AM PDT
there is a difference in the type of numbers

you lib art majors dont understand anything beyond your own very limited little shakespeare philosophy and fail to dream of any alternatives or extensions

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 30, 2012 10:29:48 AM PDT
WolfPup says:
It's called arithmetic.

Plus, it's right there in the name of the century.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 30, 2012 10:45:44 AM PDT
only because yo umisnamed them

if you have a year zero which is when Jesus was born
you can count AD and BC and include the birth year while using the correct number to count away from that year

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 30, 2012 10:48:15 AM PDT
WolfPup says:
<<< andthehorseirodeinontoo? says:
only because yo umisnamed them>>>

I didn't name them so I couldn't have misnamed them. Though they weren't misnamed...the first century is the first century. The first day is the first day. This is because we count starting with 1.

<<<if you have a year zero which is when Jesus was born>>>

Well first of all there's no evidence all that is anything but myth, but it would still start with year 1, not year 0...because we count from 1.
you can count AD and BC and include the birth year while using the correct number to count away from that year

Posted on Oct 31, 2012 4:08:46 AM PDT
NHAtlatl says:
The Roman/Christian calendar was created without a year zero. End of story. Logic and arithmetic don't factor in. It is very simply the reality of human endeavor.

The term B.P. (years before present) has been standardized to mean years before 1955 A.D. Again, it may not be logical, but that is the way it is.
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This discussion

Discussion in:  History forum
Participants:  18
Total posts:  61
Initial post:  Oct 20, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 11, 2012

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