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Bible on History:


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Initial post: Mar 11, 2013 11:01:16 AM PDT
I saw it for the first time last night. It was entertaining and well done going over some of the most popular Bible stories.

Any thought?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 11, 2013 5:31:48 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 11, 2013 5:32:36 PM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
Joseph M. Creaney says:

[Any thought ?]

I have set up my DVR box to record all these episodes but I haven't watched them yet.

I caught a few minutes of part 1 just now though. I'm not sure too many people realize that Abraham wasn't always the kindly old gentleman they might imagine. I think the scene I was watching is where Abraham and his pals go out with clubs and other crude weapons to rescue his nephew Lot who had been kidnapped. If I recall from the bible Lot got into a lot of dangerous situations.

Those shows are good to watch for people who don't have time to go back and read the bible again assuming they have read it.

If someone has never read the bible I recommend doing that at least once.

The bible comes up a lot for me in other books I read so I get a review of the main stories quite often.

Posted on Mar 11, 2013 11:28:36 PM PDT
Jonn Jonzz says:
I like all the angry god and smiting.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 12, 2013 4:15:59 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 12, 2013 4:17:28 AM PDT
I was truly fascinated by the NOVA broadcast "The Bible's Buried Secrets." NOVA: The Bible's Buried Secrets

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/ancient/bibles-buried-secrets.html

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 12, 2013 6:30:12 AM PDT
???

what secrets ???

how did the bible bury any secrets ???

Posted on Mar 12, 2013 8:20:28 AM PDT
Yes, there are many people that want to add to the text we have today. It was a pretty good representation of the traditional Bible stories which is the purpose of the program not questioning the texts with other interpitations. If people want to offer other ideas there are other shows for that they have four hours on the books that were left out for various reasons.

One issue I had was they completly left out why Sodom was such an evil place. Was that sensitivity gays or prime time tastes. The actual story is disturbing as is the aftermath.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 12, 2013 11:59:23 AM PDT
Rachel says:
Joseph:
can you explain this episode?

Rachel

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 12, 2013 1:56:01 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 12, 2013 1:56:32 PM PDT
The of transcript the NOVA broadcast "The Bible's Buried Secrets" is at:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/ancient/bibles-buried-secrets.html

The archeological evidence indicates that the Canaanite cities fell because of internal collapse, and not because of an external "Israelite" conquest.

I was particularly fascinated by the following two items:

From http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/bible/dever.html

<<Dever: Some liberation theologians and some archeologists have argued that early Israel was a kind of revolutionary social movement. These were people rebelling against their corrupt Canaanite overlords. In my recent book on early Israel I characterize the Israelite movement as an agrarian social reform. These are pioneers in the hill country who are fleeing the urban centers, the old Canaanite cities, which are in a process of collapse. And in particular they are throwing off the yoke of their Canaanite and Egyptian overlords. They are declaring independence.

Now, why these people were willing to take such a risk, colonizing the hill country frontier, is very difficult to know. I think there were social and economic compulsions, but I would be the first to say I think it was probably also a new religious vision.>>

From: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/bible/apsell.html

<<There's another twist in this view of the Exodus that may surprise people. Many biblical scholars now think that it wasn't Israelite slaves but rather Canaanite slaves who escaped from Egypt. As these former slaves made their way back to Canaan, they stopped in a place the Bible calls Midian, where they underwent some type of religious transformation, adopting a god perhaps known as Yahu.

In our film, through dramatic reenactments, we show these former slaves returning to Canaan, where they tell their story of liberation, and of a redeeming God, to the people they find there, the ancient Israelites. Many biblical scholars think this was a critical juncture in the formation of the identity of the ancient Israelites and their belief in Yahweh, who became their one God. And it's one of the key moments in our film.>>

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 13, 2013 12:49:08 PM PDT
I have trouble with the exodus as written, it seems like a good story that is like the Oddessy. Egypt did rule over the areas where Isreal would form. They were not likley popular as the local kings were vassals and might have seen themselves as a kind of slaves. What else is intersting is that Hebrew and Phoenician are very closely related languages like Spanish and Portuguese. We have to also take into account that most of the stories that we have were written down in a time where the authors were captives in Babylon.

Many stories of Genisis have their prototypes in Sumerian lititure. The purpose of much of the Bible is not accurate history but unification and cohesive of the Jewish people in a difficult situation. The message is more moral than historical.

Posted on Mar 13, 2013 12:53:50 PM PDT
It is a very intersting question to have historical theories how the Jewish religion was formed. There are two main influences. Possibly influence from Akanaten and his one god or the spread of Zoroasterian ideas that also spread. Later possibly influences of Platonic Philosophy much later.

It is curious that this small country invented then stuck with a one god religion and that religion then became the basis for western modern religion.

Posted on Mar 18, 2013 8:32:18 AM PDT
W.T. says:
Anyone notice how that guy playing Satan looks like Obama? No joke!

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 10:43:43 AM PDT
*Anyone notice how that guy playing Satan looks like Obama? No joke!

Saw that on drudge but it didn't occur to me when I saw the show. It was a very demonic looking character, so Obama looks like the Devil...

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 18, 2013 1:13:40 PM PDT
W.T. says:
...or the Devil looks like Obama.....

Posted on Mar 19, 2013 7:13:44 AM PDT
Or the actor chosen to play Satan bears a resemblance to our president. That may have been intentional, but was probably inadvertent.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 7:18:11 AM PDT
John M. Lane says:
I saw parts of it. It looked well done and I look forward to watching more of it.

As a Christian, I am taught to regard the BIBLE as the revealed Word of God. It is, however, also a book of history and that's an aspect I haven't considered so much before.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 7:22:03 AM PDT
I would advise you to view : a lamp on the dark: the untold history of the bible documentary instead of this catholic influenced water downed deception of the Word of God

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 7:25:14 AM PDT
John M. Lane says:
I didn't notice anything especially Catholic about the parts I saw. It was part of Mary's story and I thought it was well acted. I'm not Catholic, however, and may be missing something.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 7:33:44 AM PDT
*As a Christian, I am taught to regard the BIBLE as the revealed Word of God. It is, however, also a book of history and that's an aspect I haven't considered so much before.

It is also lititure. It has a profound influence on the cuilture just as we learn shakespear and F. Scott Fitzjerald.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 7:39:34 AM PDT
*I would advise you to view : a lamp on the dark: the untold history of the bible documentary instead of this catholic influenced water downed deception of the Word of God

The show is a pretty straitforward interpetation of the bible as written not trying to speculate how some evens really happened. There are alternative stories of Exodus or Jerico.

I find the stories visually intersting taking into account better understanding of the times which the stories took place. I find it intersting how everything from clothing weapons and everyday items are presented as they might have been 3,000 years ago.

I think the story of Soddom was a bit too sanitized for TV, you lose the sence of why the city was so evil.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 7:39:56 AM PDT
John M. Lane says:
That's a good point, Joseph M. Creany.

I agree.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 8:17:33 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 19, 2013 8:19:25 AM PDT
What do you deem as catholic?

Catholicism is a distortional depiction and teaching of the Word of God, incorporating pagan customs and rituals under the baptism of "Christianity"

Did you know that the passion of "christ" depicted the 14 stations of the cross? And that the whole movie was based on a catholic women's book that she wrote about the gospel, and that it was this book that was on the self of Mel Gibsons library and "magically" fell into his hands , and saw it as a sign to go forth a make a movie based on it?

So yes I deem this bible movie in like manner, its universalism influenced which means simply speaking: watered down and ecumenical

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 8:36:45 AM PDT
John M. Lane says:
I'm not a Roman Catholic, AC Dust. I'm Lutheran.

The portion I saw concerned Mary. I am taught to respect Mary for her obedience to God. My impression of Roman Catholic views of Mary is that they regard her as a "co-Redemptress" of some sort and will sometimes pray to her for their Salvation. I am taught to pray to Christ for redemption, not to anyone else.

I was aware of some of the background of THE PASSION OF CHRIST. That said, I liked the movie and thought it was well acted. I didn't notice any attempts to slant the movie toward Roman Catholicism. It struck me as based upon Scripture more than anything else. Of course I wasn't looking for things to be offended by.

Posted on Mar 19, 2013 8:43:54 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 19, 2013 8:45:49 AM PDT
W.T. says:
While I definitely appreciate what they are trying to accomplish with "The Bible", I do have some reservations about the product that is making it to TV. The "half-documentary/half-movie" format is distracting and awkward. As a documentary the amount of narrator-spoken content is too thin to be properly informative, and conversely, as a movie the constant interruptions by the typical History Channel narrator takes away from the dramatic sensibilities.

I put this one in the "noble experiment" category. While I am still enjoying it, I hope that they don't use this hybrid format for future projects. Make either a narrated documentary or a drama, but don't try to combine them.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 8:54:17 AM PDT
*I put this one in the "noble experiment" category. While I am still enjoying it, I hope that they don't use this hybrid format for future projects.

I think it is dramatic with little narration. It fits with what they are trying to do. I like the increase in the dramatic presentation of the information over the doccumentary format.

I am azed how short the series and how muich time it took just to do the few stories they did, I think the narration helped move the story along and fill in gaps.

With the success of the series it is a given that more stories will be done.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 19, 2013 9:58:14 AM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
John M. Lane says:

[My impression of Roman Catholic views of Mary is that they regard her as a "co-Redemptress" of some sort and will sometimes pray to her for their Salvation.]

I would say the Catholic Church venerates Mary as a goddess, perhaps without fully realizing this themselves or using that terminology. They are I believe correct about this.

I believe this goddess appears in other mythologies. She is also called Eve in the bible, Aset / Isis by the Egyptians, and Athena by the Greeks.

The mysterious alchemist Fulcanelli felt that Mary is also Rhea, the mother of the gods.

Fulcanelli: Master Alchemist: Le Mystere des Cathedrales, Esoteric Intrepretation of the Hermetic Symbols of The Great Work [Paperback]
Fulcanelli (Author)

The Miracle of Our Lady of Fatima (2006)
Angela Clarke (Actor), Gilbert Roland (Actor), John Brahm (Director) |
Rated: NR | Format: DVD
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Discussion in:  History forum
Participants:  22
Total posts:  92
Initial post:  Mar 11, 2013
Latest post:  Apr 10, 2013

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