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Hitler's mistakes

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In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 12:51:58 AM PDT
JB Frodsham. says:
Jeff Marzano: The British had some weird plans to kill Hitler. Apparently when Hitler got into a mad crazy rage ( Which he did often) he would throw himself on the floor and bite the carpet like a mad dog. So the plan was to replace the carpet in his office with a poisoned one. I wonder if this is true? Very funny if it is.

I am afraid that revisionists Historians are still alive and well. We still have that problem with CAGW where the Manns of this word deny that the Medieval Warming took place and tried to remove it from history. He has now retracted that statement and said it was a local abnormality. It was world wide. I know off topic.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 1:06:27 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 30, 2012 6:18:45 AM PDT
JB Frodsham. says:
Jeff Maranzo, yes the bombings did have an effect. But interestingly when the bombings were starting to cause the sort of damage that was effecting the course of the war, the war for Hitler was already lost, the fire bombing of Dresden was unnecessary; but they had a huge bomber force by then, and it had to be used.

BTW: There is some very interesting opinion on the use of gun turrets to protect bombers. They were really quite useless. It was known very early on in 1941 that the best way to protect bombers was with fighter cover. The Spitfire could have been modified to take drop tanks then! This was not done. A lot of lives could have been saved. Now that is a story in itself.

I am editing this post: Wiki "Drop tanks were prohibited on fighter aircraft and on medium bombers by the so-called Bomber Mafia in the United States Army Air Corps prior to direct U.S. involvement in World War II. The bomber theorists assumed that bombers would be self-defending; they saw long-range fighters as "a myth",[1] as they could be easily forced to drop the tanks by minor harassment just at the beginning of the raid.The Allies commonly used them to allow fighters increased range and patrol time over continental Europe. The first[citation needed] RAF use of such external fuel tanks occurred in 1942, during the transit of Supermarine Spitfires to Malta."

So they knew. But did not do it to protect the bombers.Why. I have a book in Australia called Gunner ( Sorry but I am now living in Vietnam so I can not reference it) that says the turret manufactures had political clout, and wanted to protect their industry. If that is the case they were responsible for a lot of death including my great uncle, he was a tail gunner in a Lancaster . Hmm I wonder?

Again I could be wrong? But that I guess is a discussion on another thread. :-)

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 1:34:29 AM PDT
JB Frodsham. says:
Gregory Mays: In a way you are correct but there were people working for the American government prior to 1941 on the breaking of Japanese codes. This is not something that could be accomplished in a few days, as seen in the goings on at Bletchley Park.

By May 1941, the Navy discovered that the Germans had informed the Japanese that the United States had broken Purple, and both the Army and Navy began to curtail the flow of all Magic information to Roosevelt, offering only summaries. Even so, by the summer of 1941, the Magic source was the only good information available to Roosevelt about Japanese intentions.

Hmm: Interesting stuff, I wonder....

Posted on Mar 30, 2012 5:24:07 AM PDT
DarthRad says:
There's an interesting DVD series on Netflix called "Hitler's Bodyguards" that talks about all the various assassination attempts against Hitler. There were indeed quite a few.

Also of interest - Rommel started out life as the chief of Hitler's special bodyguard service, the Fuhrer Begleit Brigade. Hitler got to really liking Rommel, and that was how he got on the fast track to success.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 6:28:32 AM PDT
AxisBeefyBoy says:
Rommel wasn't just some shlub sitting around until chosen by Hitler; Rommel was an omni-competent infantry officer during the first war who was famous in his own right. His pre-WW2 works were translated into english and read as far away as the States.

Patton: "Rommel, you magnificent bast$$d! I read your book!"

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 6:37:08 AM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
JB Frodsham. says:

[Jeff Marzano: The British had some weird plans to kill Hitler. Apparently when Hitler got into a mad crazy rage ( Which he did often) he would throw himself on the floor and bite the carpet like a mad dog.]

This reminds me of a sexual liaison Hitler had with a beautiful German actress one evening.

They got back to Adolf's pad and then I guess Adolf undressed and laid down on the floor and ordered the actress to start kicking him.

Then they engaged in Adolf's special brand of sexual activity, what they call "Hiter's Perversion".

The actress jumped out of a window soon after.

Jeff Marzano

The Mind of Adolf Hitler - The Secret Wartime Report

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 6:48:13 AM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
JB Frodsham. says:

[BTW: There is some very interesting opinion on the use of gun turrets to protect bombers. They were really quite useless.]

Yes the history of the bombing campaigns into Germany isn't too good. The bombers didn't have a chance in hell against the Germain fighters and their deadly cannons.

I hadn't heard the part about a possible financial motive. Sounds like Viet Nam.

Many mistakes were made during World War II.

I just watched an episode of WW II In Color I think it was about the D Day invasion at Normandy.

The allies had complete air superiority and the plan was to bomb the locations where the Germans had their guns set up near the beaches.

But it was a foggy day so the Navy told the Air Force to wait at least 5 seconds longer before dropping their bombs on the German guns to make sure they didn't bomb the allied troops. That 5 second delay caused the bombs to over shoot the German guns.

The Navy ships heroically turned broadside and started shelling the German locations with those gigantic naval guns. It wasn't too much fun to be on the other end of those guns.

What a blood bath. The Germans had a machine gun that could fire 25 bullets a second. They had figured out how to increase the rate of fire of a machine gun by adding these roller things to the mechanism that chambers the next round.

Then there was the deadly accurate German 88 mm gun.

Jeff Marzano

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 6:53:36 AM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
DarthRad says:

[There's an interesting DVD series on Netflix called "Hitler's Bodyguards" that talks about all the various assassination attempts against Hitler.]

That show is on The Military Channel also but I haven't watched it.

That's ironic about Rommel.

There's a TV documentary where they actually recreated the briefcase bomb and set it off inside a mock up of the Wolf's Lair conference room.

They used the same type of explosives and recreated everything exactly.

The experiment reproduced pretty much exactly what happened.

With only one explosive charge in the case Hitler received some relatively minor injuries although I think it blew his ear drums. He did no escape completely unscathed.

There was a piece of wood attached to the table that shielded Hitler from the blast to some extent.

The addition of the second charge into the briefcase would have killed Hitler and probably everyone else in the room. This was a conference room so the effects of the blast were magnified I think.

How much it would have mattered if Hitler was killed that day I don't know.

Jeff Marzano

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 6:54:31 AM PDT
Gregory Mays says:
>>. His pre-WW2 works were translated into english and read as far away as the States.<<

What Rommel championed was the idea that you could simulate a battle before the fact. That you could rehearse battle decision making. The idea that you could 'learn' to be a good commander without being in battle was radical at the time. Now, everyone does it. Rommel's parents were both educators I believe, so his instinct was that anything could be taught.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 7:08:00 AM PDT
Warren B. in CB

When you become a dictator such as Hitler you self-destruct.
Mistakes were many: Invading Russia,thinking the USA was too disorganized to enter the war and the biggest, thinking he was the chosen one
to unite Germany and listening to only himself and not his Military advisers.
One of the most interesting figures in 20th Century history and the most frighting.
Horrible as it is he still has followers today.
Historians today still can not how explain how he became what he was considering what little they know about his early days.
The people surrounding him were the worse scum of the human race and inflicted horror after horror on innocent people.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 7:15:54 AM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
Warren B. in C. B. says:

[One of the most interesting figures in 20th Century history and the most frighting.]

Yes people have been trying to figure out Hitler and the Nazis ever since.

They had everything a psychiatrist could ever dream of.

The master race idea, beliefs in Atlantis and the occult, the sexual issues, the drug addiction, the racial hatred and death camps, the research into ancient myths to create super weapons, etc..

What a strange time period in history.

Jeff Marzano

Secrets of the Unified Field: The Philadelphia Experiment, The Nazi Bell, and the Discarded Theory

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 7:29:57 AM PDT
Gregory Mays says:
>>It wasn't clear to me that Rommel was really one of the conspirators.He may have been aware of the plot I'm not even clear on that. But he had talked to someone who knew about it and this other guy implicated Rommel.<<

I think the Germans, even today, are very protective about how exactly Rommel fit into all this. He is arguably the most popular general since Bismarck. And he was from Germany proper, not Prussia, to boot. And don't forget, he was wildly popular even then. So, Hitler himself wanted no part of the public finding out that their most popular General wanted the Fuhrer dead.
I was told when I lived in Germany, that when the time came that they could rehabilitate a Nazi general, Rommel was first on their list. His childhood home and various of his memorabilia have already been set aside by historical groups.
So, for the Rommel lovers in Germany, and there's a bunch, this one incident is the single stain on his record. So, they downplay it at every turn.

Posted on Mar 30, 2012 7:31:07 AM PDT
JB Frodsham. says:
Gee there are some very interesting people in this forum. :=)

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 7:34:12 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 30, 2012 7:34:32 AM PDT
JB Frodsham. says:
Jeff Marzano:

"Secrets of the Unified Field: The Philadelphia Experiment, The Nazi Bell, and the Discarded Theory"

I just ordered that book via my Kindle, love to read interesting stuff, thank you for that Jeff!

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 7:38:13 AM PDT
John M. Lane says:
Hello JB Frodsham,

I've learned a lot from the other members of this forum, too, including you. Thanks for the informative posts you've put up.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 7:40:21 AM PDT
John M. Lane says:
I reviewed Rommel's book for Amazon, AxisBeefyBoy. I agreed with Patton and gave the Desert Fox five stars.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 7:43:17 AM PDT
John M. Lane says:
You might be interested in THE HIDDEN HITLER by Professor Lothar Machtan, Jeff Marzano. He studied Hitler's sexual preferences and concluded that the Fuhrer was a homosexual.

Langer mentioned that as a "rumor" in his MIND OF ADOLF HITLER, but didn't study it like Machtan did. Langer was an American and Machtan is a German, with access to archival sources in Germany.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 8:33:14 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 30, 2012 8:38:33 AM PDT
JB Frodsham. says:
John M lane:

Blast that book is not a Kindle book on Amazon.

Apparently Hitler liked to be defecated on by women. So he was into poo sex, yuk, he was really disgusting. I also note that he like to surround himself with some real weirdos. Just look at his henchmen. The only one who really scares me is Reinhard Heydrich (Note I put that in the now) Hitler once said about him " That man, that man, his heart, his heart, is made of stone" I am convinced that had Hitler won the war and later died or retired that Reinhard Heydrich would have been his successor. If that had happened:

Sorry guys I lost am lost for words on that! I feel sick.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 8:36:21 AM PDT
JB Frodsham. says:
John M. Lane

"I've learned a lot from the other members of this forum, too, including you. Thanks for the informative posts you've put up."

Thanks for that John M. Lane, and thank you for yours too. :=)

Yes these guys are very good.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 9:52:15 AM PDT
F. Gleaves says:
Churchill admitted to being delighted to have the US enter the war. But he was shocked to learn how badly the Pacific Fleet had been hit.

There wasn't any reason for the British to hold back any information from the US.

The Japanese would provide all the justification for war anyone could want.

The better prepared we were for the attack, the more damage we could do to the attackers and the sooner we could reinforce the Brits and drive back the Japanese.

As things turned put, the British were soon driven out of Burma and Malaya and the Japanese Navy was attacking British ships and bases in the Indian Ocean.

The Aussie divisions had to be pulled out of the fight in North Africa to defend their homes from Japanese invasion.

Although some people had predicted a Japanese air attack on Hawaii, there were good reasons for naval intelligence to think the Japanese couldn't pull it off.

The Japanese didn't have the special torpedoes and AP bombs before October 1941 and had never even refueled destroyers at sea before then. If the Japanese had run into any worse weather on the trip to Hawaii, only three of their carriers had the range to reach attack position and their oilers wouldn't have had enough fuel for the destroyers to go with them. _Pearl Harbor_ HP Willmott

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 9:57:00 AM PDT
John M. Lane says:
Hello F. Gleaves,

I recall reading of the Japanese torpedoes that they were modified by fitting wooden fins to them enabling them to operate in shallower water than was normally the case. That was one of the reasons why the US Navy wasn't worried about torpedo attacks in Pearl Harbor.

In other words, the Imperial Japanese Navy used their regular torpedoes (which were excellent) and modified them by fitting auxiliary fins to them. I don't recall the source, but can track it down. I think it's in Gordon Prang's book.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 10:06:43 AM PDT
JB Frodsham. says:
John M. Lane:

"I recall reading of the Japanese torpedoes that they were modified by fitting wooden fins to them enabling them to operate in shallower water than was normally the case"

Yes you are right. Also the Japanese took an intense interest in the battle of Battle of Taranto: November 1941.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 10:08:51 AM PDT
John M. Lane says:
Yes, I believe the British used torpedo bombers to sink an Italian ship, or vice versa. I'm having a senior moment here. :0

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 10:26:02 AM PDT
JB Frodsham. says:
F.Gleaves

"There wasn't any reason for the British to hold back any information from the US"

No there was not, that is why the Americans were warned, but from what I can ascertain from my father the Americans did not believe it. I just like the idea that Roosevelt knew. Yes I know "Wrong" but fun to think it.

You would have thought that after Pearl Harbor the British would have seen that a battleship without air cover was a sitting duck, but terribly they lost the Prince of Wales and Repulse of the coast of Malaya, that was so dumb, there was supposed to be an aircraft carrier with them but it ran aground in the Caribbean.

One needs to remember that the British thought that the Japanese made bad pilots as their eyes made it difficult to see, so they all had to wear glasses. Stupid racism at its worst.

On another note.

Have you read the Dark Valley? The book is fantastic!!

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 30, 2012 10:31:36 AM PDT
JB Frodsham. says:
John M Lane

Yes they used stringbags: 24 Fairey Swordfish torpedo bombers. Amazing stuff.
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