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Hitler's mistakes

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In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 8:40:32 AM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
Leslie Funk says:

[as I have to work , sometimes 12 hours a day]

I don't think I could consistently work 12 hours a day on any job.

It would have to be something I really enjoy and am passionate about and I have never found anything like that in my life.

Jeff Marzano

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 8:44:18 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Feb 10, 2013 3:12:11 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 8:53:42 AM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
Gregory Mays says:

[Phil Spector had lots of material to work with.]

It's interesting how people can express their feelings and ideas with music. This usually requires lyrics unless the song is only music.

Music is the most powerful of the arts some people say.

Spector went off the deep end. A little man who liked to play with big guns I guess.

Jeff Marzano

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 8:55:54 AM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
vespasian says:

[Jeedgr, Watch what you say about mendacity.]

That's a new word I learned. I had to look up the definition.

It's always good to have a repertoire of appropriate words.

Jeff Marzano

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 9:07:05 AM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
Rachel says:

[I forgot to include you in my good bye.]

Too bad you have to go Rachel. We will miss you.

Jeff Marzano

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 9:13:56 AM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
Jeedgr says:

[Haidt by the way discusses Plato's Republic and his two protagonists for illustrating the moral dilemna(SP?).]

Do you like Plato's books ? If so why ?

What did Haidt say about The Republic ?

I've read quite a bit of Plato's stuff. But after all that I can't really tell what his main points were.

I guess one is the idea of the soul, good and evil, God's judgment on the soul, and related issues. What does it really mean to be 'good' is another possibility.

According to the legends Plato traveled to Egypt and experienced the mysterious initiation rites at some level. The initiates were sworn to secrecy about what they learned since this involved knowledge about the mysteries of nature, the human body, alchemy, magic, etc.. So for me probably the things I would find most interesting about Plato are the things he had vowed never to reveal.

I assume this is where Plato heard about his famous geometric solids. Sacred geometry would have also been something the initiates learned about. There's a theory that there are 12 universes. Plato felt that the dodecahedron geometric solid was a representation of all of creation. This geometric shape has 12 faces.

Plato believed in Atlantis which was at first a sort of utopia. The Republic and The Laws talk about society, society's rules, etc.. I guess that's another re-occurring theme for Plato.

Jeff Marzano

Atlantis

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 9:18:10 AM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
vespasian says:

[You did know that ancient Romans used a sponge on a stick as toilet paper.]

They definitely had some problems in the Roman empire.

Some people think that lunatic emperor Caligula went crazy from the lead based flavoring they put into their wine. That plus the possible effects of advanced herpes that attacked his brain.

Caligula declared war on the sea god Neptune. I think I heard also that Cali would chop off the heads of the statues of the gods and replace them with an image of his own head.

One day Caligula had a vision where Zeus spoke to him. Zeus told Caligula that something very important was going to happen that day.

That was the day Caligula got turned into Swiss cheese by two of his bodyguards.

Jeff Marzano

Zeus: A Journey Through Greece in the Footsteps of a God

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 9:24:14 AM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
Lana B. says:

[Here education is so poor,people are manipulated and brainwashed and scared easily.]

Do you think if people were more educated in the U.S. it would also collapse like the former Soviet Union ?

I heard American kids are lagging way behind other countries with their math and science skills. Well those subjects are difficult and require doing a lot of homework. American kids are too busy with all their video games, cell phones, internet, drugs, etc.. Those things take time.

Jeff Marzano

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 9:26:27 AM PDT
Gregory Mays says:
>>American health care is a virtual El Dorado.We do not have a political will and common sense to admit that health care is a basic human necessity<<

Well, yes and no. We accept that anyone appearing at an emergency ward has a right to service. So, in that sense medical care is a basic right. But the Devil is in the details.
For instance..I had a tenant that was poor, and came down with Breast Cancer. There was no offer of treatment in Texas. She was offered nothing, and just died. Medicaid in Texas didn't cover any procedure.
In Texas, I'm convinced the system is rigged, and not toward the patient.

On the other hand....I know a Filipino in San Jose CA. He had a hole in his heart, a birth defect, that had never been diagnosed. Based on his Green Card status, he received open heart surgery with Medicaid, and is fine today. Basically, a $250,000 procedure.

The ability of states to establish their own rules, for Medicaid, strikes me as problematic. Medicaid is a Federal program, but the States make their own rules. To me, that's an issue that is fraught with potential for abuse and neglect. And by the way, you notice that Obamacare, even in its most optimistic variant, had this same qualifier. States set the rules for who gets what.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 9:26:38 AM PDT
Jeff Marzano says:
Jeedgr says:

[well it turns out that they had the APA convention in Phillie this week; 10,000 shrinks in one place at one time.]

Back in October of last year I had demons talking to me directly for a few days. We turned to the Church at first but I ended up being sent to a psychiatrist.

I thought I was in trouble with the demons but things really got dangerous when I started talking to those head shrinkers with their bottomless prescription pads.

Jeff Marzano

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 9:30:08 AM PDT
Bubba says:
The amount of wood used for making wooden chopsticks is staggering. There are more eco-friendly chopsticks made of a corn starch based plastic, and from bamboo, unfortunately they cost about twice as much as wooden chopsticks.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 9:31:24 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 9, 2012 9:33:19 AM PDT
Gregory Mays says:
Very interesting. I take you at your words. But notice there aren't many drug trademarks on the list. I bet Pharma companies are over this issue, and fight tooth and nail against it.

And it is starting to seem familiar to me. I think in college it actually came up in Accounting of all things. Trademarks are considered part of 'good will' that a company has that is worth money. And if your trademark goes generic, essentially entering the Public Domain, you have to account for the loss.
So, I would think trademark owners would fight long and hard against this practice.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 9:39:37 AM PDT
Bubba says:
You don't have to believe me, I put the the wikipedia link I got the lists from in my post.

I'm not a lawyer, I am just aware of the situation. It is why companies are very protective of their trademarks and sic the attack dogs on anybody who is misusing their trademarks.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 9:41:08 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Feb 10, 2013 3:12:12 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 9:44:28 AM PDT
Gregory Mays says:
>>I heard American kids are lagging way behind other countries with their math and science skills. Well those subjects are difficult and require doing a lot of homework. <<

They also require good math and science teachers. And we don't have many. People who are good at math and science become engineers, not teachers. Because of the pay disparity. In Europe and Asia, teachers are paid well, so the disparity is not as huge, as it is here. Not to mention that, in Germany say, the State makes sure a certain number of Math and Science graduates go into teaching. It's a very deterministic University system. And it can be, because it's free.

And industry can help here, they just rarely do. For instance: Bill Gates and his partner Paul Allen, had computer programming courses in Junior High School in Seattle. They were taught by programmers from Boeing, who were allowed sabbaticals, to teach in local public schools. They used computers that were donated by Boeing.

And look at how much of technology's future was determined by that program.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 9:53:00 AM PDT
Gregory Mays says:
>>The French people in their consciousness, for example, capitulated long before the war with Germans. <<

There was a very popular academic debate following WWI, as to whether the country would have been better off simply surrendering quickly. I think that's the path they chose in 1940.
Of course the new wrinkle was a conqueror who would then proceed with mass murder of anyone in your society they considered genetically inferior, and not worthy of being a European.
By the time Germany got around to Soviet Union, this part of the equation was well understood.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 9:55:50 AM PDT
Gregory Mays says:
>>Spector went off the deep end. A little man who liked to play with big guns I guess.<<

Friends say he was always crazy. It's just that when you're making millions for media companies, people are prepared to turn a blind eye to gun play, and drug indulgence, in a music studio.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 10:22:10 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Feb 10, 2013 3:12:13 PM PST]

Posted on Jun 9, 2012 11:14:23 AM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Jun 9, 2012 11:15:11 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 11:26:31 AM PDT
Greg: Summed up nicely. To say Phil Spector was an eccentric is an understatement. He produced hit recordings and worked with and discovered
many singing groups to begin with. He created what was called the "Wall Of Sound" which no one else could duplicate as well as he did.
His theory was if one piano and two guitars sound good then three pianos and four guitars would sound better.
He was fascinated with guns and of course drugs of all types were in recording studios.
The murder was unfortunate but not a shock to people that knew him or following his career.
Now serving a life sentence for murder.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 11:35:03 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 9, 2012 11:46:29 AM PDT
Jeff: The Mind of Adolf Hitler-The Secret Wartime Report by Walter C. Langer is the book I consider the easiest to read and most complete.
You can pick out any section of the book to read it is not necessary to start at the beginning.
The title is a little misleading,it is a study of his mind but the author goes into simple details of Hitler's life to find out how they affected his
thinking and life style.
Interesting photographs included also.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 11:44:25 AM PDT
Jeff: Agree with your comment. Napoleon and Stalin started young in the military and politics.
Hitler looking at what he wanted to accomplish at his age and physical condition probably pushed him into making mistakes. His early success
probably convinced him that is was all going to be quick and easy and he went full speed ahead and got involved in too much at one time.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 9, 2012 11:55:26 AM PDT
Greg: I was working when 3M came out with the Post-Note,a huge seller for them.
Companies that tried to duplicate it did not last long.
3M is still a huge company,in the time period I am talking about they were like the military,salespeople dressed alike took training and did not
deviate from it, a lot of the reps left 3M and turned up calling on me from other companies,they said good training background but too much
pressure and military tactics.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 10, 2012 7:56:52 AM PDT
Gregory Mays says:
>> a lot of the reps left 3M and turned up calling on me from other companies,they said good training background but too much
pressure and military tactics.<<

Companies in Minnesota (3M, Target, Best Buy) tend to be very good at structure and hierarchy. I attribute it to their Scandinavian roots. But like Scandinavia, the tendency to want everyone to march to the exact same beat, and work for the common good, is very strong. Diversity constantly works against that.

I heard an interview with the CEO of Target on the radio. They asked him what was next in his assault against WalMart. He said, "WalMart's not my target. We believe a certain percentage of shoppers will pay a little bit more for a better shopping experience."
That's a guy who understands the advantages of Minnesota's instincts, but at the same time, the limitations of their approach.

When I was working in Scandinavia, I noticed that large computers in Sweden were invariably Control Data Computers. I asked someone why that was, since CDC was a minor player at best in America. His answer was simple. CDC's based in Minneapolis. The cultural connection is noticed, even by the Swedes.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 10, 2012 11:42:24 AM PDT
Greg: Each is own. The Target Store when it was in Mall Of The Bluffs was one of the best,then they moved into a new strip mall and everything
went up in price and down in practical items. Penny's the same,in a strip mall big store with nothing in it practical.
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Discussion in:  History forum
Participants:  166
Total posts:  10000
Initial post:  Feb 1, 2012
Latest post:  Feb 13, 2013

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