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Lincoln (the movie)


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Showing 1-21 of 21 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 28, 2012 8:14:57 AM PST
IGS says:
Has anyone seen this movie? What are your thoughts on it? Dramatically? Historical accuracy?

Posted on Nov 28, 2012 8:33:19 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 28, 2012 8:35:48 AM PST
Debunker says:
Hopefully you'll get some good feedback on the movie, but you can also expect a couple of knuckleheads to pop in with their absurd accusations of "tyrant" and "dictator".

Posted on Nov 28, 2012 9:06:53 AM PST
Palladin55 says:
I've seen the movie. Dramatically, very good. Daniel Day Lewis is great in the role. Historical accuracy? I'll leave to the history buffs on the thread.

Posted on Nov 29, 2012 11:14:44 AM PST
W.T. says:
I'm not a Lincoln expert, but it seemed to be generally accurate, though I'm not sure Mary Todd Lincoln was exactly portrayed just right. The cast did a really good job. Day-Lewis will probably win best actor.

Something about the design of the movie bothered me a bit. Rather than gritty "realism", the look of the film has a sot of ethereal quality to it. Something about the contrast, maybe. The figures are accentuated and pop out from their surroundings. I wonder what the film was shot with? Digital or film?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 10, 2012 12:04:19 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 10, 2012 12:32:55 PM PST
bloomsday says:
Kodak film was specifically credited. The color timers were credited too...those are the visually ultra-perceptive people who adjust color to match appropriately from scene to scene and for final prints. I think Technicolor Labs was involved but the film was shot on color negative film, not in the now abandoned Technicolor process.

Yes, sometimes characters do "pop out" unrealistically....surely an aesthetic decision. Perhaps the director wanted to deal more with truth about a timeless hero than to meet our popular expectations.

Some of the "etherial quality" had to do with cigar, fireplace and battlefield smoke. It also seemed the director's way of telling us we were seeing treasured history. Modern affectation of "gritty" technique is more often "truthy" than truthful. Any inconsequential story can be rendered "gritty"...it's easy.

I think "Lincoln" is a timeless historic document, not just a movie. What individual had more to do with this country's greatness?

Buy "Abraham Lincoln, Team of Rivals" by Doris Kearns Goodwin. A big book. It'll take a long time to read and digest. Obama did it before his 2008 triumph and said he was reading again when he took office. I'd like to read it again myself, but I'm already eager to see the movie the second time. The movie credits the book.

Posted on Dec 10, 2012 8:35:56 PM PST
Al says:
I saw it on Saturday, two days ago. I liked it. It is slow-paced, mostly concerned with Lincoln's attempts to get the emancipation amendment (not proclamation) added to the constitution. I found it really interesting to see the compromises and political horse-trading that was going on. As I understand it, Mrs. Lincoln was a jealous nut, so she seems accurately portayed.

Posted on Dec 10, 2012 10:22:00 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 10, 2012 10:22:50 PM PST
Mikeber says:
For those who expect historical accuracy: it is Hollywood, not a historical document.
In most cases, historical accuracy doesn't translate well to the silver screen. And, as is always the case with such figures, the movie Lincoln shows his creators bias. On the other hand, nobody expected "Titanic" to be historically accurate...

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 26, 2012 10:22:04 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 26, 2012 10:22:16 AM PST
W.T. says:
"On the other hand, nobody expected "Titanic" to be historically accurate.."

You mean that "king of the world" guy wasn't real? No wonder I got an "F" on my History Paper! I want my money back, Cameron! :-)

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 26, 2012 10:26:47 AM PST
Mickey says:
I thought it was well directed with good acting, and I thought it was pretty accurate although not completely so - no movie is.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 26, 2012 10:54:10 AM PST
Yeah, this movie skirted right over the vampire issue.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012 6:44:27 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 28, 2012 6:45:35 AM PST
W.T. says:
As I understand it from living in Lexington, Ky (where she was from), Mary Todd Lincoln was much more of a nut than she was portrayed in the movie. Except for one scene, she was really whitewashed in the movie. The way she was in that one scene was apparently one of her better days. And she was frequently physically abusive to Lincoln, even while he was in the White House.

Posted on Dec 28, 2012 6:46:48 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 28, 2012 10:08:44 AM PST
W.T. says:
Beyond Daniel Day-Lewis, I thought the actor who stole the show was Tommy Lee Jones. It was also good to see Hal Holbrook in a role, since he's one of the most prominent past Lincoln's (arguably the best portrayal other than DDL).

Day-Lewis did a remarkable job. He perhaps incorporated a bit too much of Henry Fonda influence in how he pronounced certain phrases, but overall, it has to be the best "Lincoln" portrayal ever.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012 9:10:54 AM PST
Hi IGS, I would like to know if the movie showed Abraham in his younger adult days? Did they show him as a lawyer?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012 10:09:28 AM PST
W.T. says:
The movie focuses entirely on the last few months of his life, concentrating mostly on the effort to get the 13th amendment passed.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012 10:59:38 AM PST
Ahhh I see

Posted on Dec 28, 2012 11:51:25 AM PST
bloomsday says:
I'm pretty well-read but I've generally avoided American history....it never occurred to me to think about the significance of the Cabinet...which is what the book is substantially about (Team of Rivals) and which the movie illustrates well.

Posted on Jan 1, 2013 8:34:07 AM PST
S. Kessler says:
I saw the film Christmas Day. As an admitted American History geek, I thought it was wonderful, down to the minutest detail. Daniel Day Lewis became Lincoln, he was fantastic. And yes, Tommy Lee Jones almost stole the show from him. I also had fun trying to recognize all the A-list actors under their mountain of wiskers. But the best thing is that the movie was so erudite and articulate while also being a heckuva lot of fun. If only our present day senators were so articulate and well educated.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2013 9:50:33 AM PST
S. Kessler,
Do you know if the note to the House on the day of the vote--where Lincoln wrote "So far as I know" there are no Confederate commissioners in Washington--is factual? The movie was indeed fantastic--I have seen it three times and may see it again.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2013 10:57:41 AM PST
Iowa Reader says:
According to this article, the note incident is true.
http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2012/11/09/lincoln_historical_accuracy_sorting_fact_from_fiction_in_the_steven_spielberg.html

"As in Lincoln, the vote on the 13th Amendment took place just as Confederate representatives were headed north for peace negotiations. When word of these peace commissioners got out, there was a motion to delay the vote until after negotiations, which could have put the vote in jeopardy. However, Lincoln was able to defuse this rumor by using carefully worded language, just as in the movie. He wrote:

To: James Ashley
So far as I know, there are no peace commissioners in the city or likely to be in it.

A. Lincoln"

I absolutely loved this movie. I went home with a mental list of all the things I needed to check on, including the last scene with Tommy Lee Jones--I don't think he really took that particular document home with him, but the rest of the home scene was based on truth. My favorite tid bit of Thaddeus Stevens trivia: the public school attended by little Amy Carter was Thaddeus Stevens Elementary School.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 1, 2013 2:36:32 PM PST
Iowa Reader,
Thank you for the reference from Slate. Thaddeus Stevens is a really interesting individual. One of the first things I did after seeing the movie was to read the wikipedia article about him.

Posted on Jan 2, 2013 5:31:22 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 2, 2013 5:33:54 AM PST
W.T. says:
Beyond the "A" list, I also thought that Jackie Earle Haley did a really good job playing that Confederate representative. It was a minor role, but for an actor who has made his name with playing comic book characters in popcorn movies and TV shows, the performance showed real acting chops.
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This discussion

Discussion in:  History forum
Participants:  13
Total posts:  21
Initial post:  Nov 28, 2012
Latest post:  Jan 2, 2013

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