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In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 5:26:38 PM PDT
recluse says:
True on all counts.

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 5:51:17 PM PDT
LFrog1386 says:
You forget I live in the back of beyond. My small-town library doesn't even book-share with others yet! Considering tons of other small libraries have been doing so for years, it makes me wonder what percentage of the town's budget our library gets.

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 5:54:05 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 22, 2012 5:56:51 PM PDT
LFrog1386 says:
6138; does the book have that "Japanese" feel to it? I read one book that was highly acclaimed and it was a struggle to read it all. The first 80 pages (!!!) were nothing but philosophical dialogue between two characters. I know they accuse us Yanks of having zero patience but that was just ROUGH. But we lost power for 5 days and I finished it that week and was glad I did. It all made sense in the end. I can't even remember the name of the book now!

Ah-found it. It was The Summer of the Ubume.

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 6:05:26 PM PDT
recluse says:
That sucks rancid chum.

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 6:06:55 PM PDT
recluse says:
I've had a problem with a couple of "highly acclaimed" translated books.

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 6:50:41 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 22, 2012 6:51:01 PM PDT
6138 says:
Not at all Froggie, the author was born in Japan, but his family moved to England when he was very young. The book was not translated, was originally written in English and the story also develops in England. The guy is more English than Japanese.
It has a certain Sci-Fi feel, but that is only a way to develop the story. Not the real important part. (trying not to give anything away)

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 6:55:53 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 22, 2012 6:56:21 PM PDT
6138 says:
Agree with you. My native language is Spanish and I simply don't understand how some authors can be translated. Like Borges, for example, or Cortazar.
Another great book is "La Sombra del viento" The Shadow of the Wind, but I suspect that the wonders of the book can be easily lost in the translation (I read it in Spanish) and in English the dialogues and even the actions of the characters may simply sound ridiculous. It is way to "Spanish". If you never been in Spain and talked to the people there you simply cannot understand it, or at least is very difficult.

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 7:04:31 PM PDT
recluse says:
I read The Shadow of the Wind in English and loved it!

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 7:04:37 PM PDT
LFrog1386 says:
Sounds good, 6138. I will look for it!

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 7:28:25 PM PDT
6138 says:
Glad to hear that recluse!
It is indeed a wonderful book!
Did you read the sequel, "The Angel's Game"?
It is very good too, but IMO the shadow is better...

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 7:29:31 PM PDT
6138 says:
But keep in mind Froggie that is a slow-paced story, you have to be patient with it...

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 7:36:07 PM PDT
recluse says:
Not yet.
It is on my TBR list.

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 9:23:05 PM PDT
Marc Iverson says:
Dunno. Just read that the guy who owns the village they used for a set wants to sell the property for over a million bucks. It's an abandoned village on a larger piece of property, and he's tired of the tourism hassle, supposedly.

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 9:23:45 PM PDT
Marc Iverson says:
I've heard many good things about any number of his works (but not all of them). I think I remember reading that the movie was pretty good too.

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 9:24:58 PM PDT
Marc Iverson says:
Try here. There's both. Kindle is 11.99.

Never Let Me Go (Movie Tie-In Edition) (Vintage International)

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 9:27:35 PM PDT
Marc Iverson says:
I think there are multiple possible interpretations to most any work with any depth to it. Perhaps something is inevitably lost in translation, but since a work of art has more than one meaning, perhaps something good can still remain?

In reply to an earlier post on May 23, 2012 3:40:10 AM PDT
LFrog1386 says:
Thanks, Marc, I will check it out!

Posted on May 23, 2012 5:12:39 AM PDT
Good morning, Loungers!

I wanted to pass on that McCammon's Mystery Walk is on sale today for 1.99. (The Kindle version is usually 9.99!)

In reply to an earlier post on May 23, 2012 6:38:55 AM PDT
6138 says:
Didn't see the movie yet, the waiting list for it in my library is very long (Im in spot 30 right now, long wait...)

In reply to an earlier post on May 23, 2012 6:45:38 AM PDT
6138 says:
For sure, but sometimes is like looking at a picture of a Dali's painting vs looking at the original painting.

One problem with translations is that very often the publishing companies want to get the book out in as many languages as possible and as fast a possible without paying too much and the translations suffer.
I started reading Stephen King as a teenager in Spanish and now looking at those old books a realize that the translations are simply terrible.

In reply to an earlier post on May 23, 2012 7:03:02 AM PDT
6138 says:
Is very good.
Is really a prequel to the Shadow with more supernatural elements in it.
It is a great book and you learn about the origins of the characters of The Shadow.
There is also a new book in the series that will be available in English around July or something like that. I didn't read the Spanish version yet but I'm planning to do it soon.

In reply to an earlier post on May 23, 2012 3:16:37 PM PDT
J. Case says:
Are you talking about The Shadow as in the Original Master of Darkness, and says "Who Knows What Evil Lurks in the Hearts of Men?"

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 11:18:19 AM PDT
Marc Iverson says:
I've read some translations from the French that made for excellent books, and from the Russian and Greek. Homer, Celine, Dostoyevsk, and Camus come to mind. The stories and their line-by-line intensity was so good and ran so deep that even if something was lost (as they say is the case with Celine's use of French "thieves' argot" that is very hard to translate), what remained was still extraordinary even in English. I've seen some translations described as works of art in themselves.

I suppose the risk is much greater with popular fiction, which is less likely to have a committed and resourceful scholar or language expert striving to make the very best translations. I've seen some translations bemoaned for being quite casual approximations of the original author's wording and likely intent.

Posted on May 24, 2012 3:24:26 PM PDT
J. Case says:
I'm going to see Men In Black 3 on Friday.

Watched the Trailer for Gangster Squad looks like it could be this decade's The Untouchables.

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 3:48:04 PM PDT
LFrog1386 says:
Did you see Dark Shadows, J. Case? I want to see that and MIB III.
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Discussion in:  Horror forum
Participants:  67
Total posts:  6504
Initial post:  Feb 14, 2012
Latest post:  3 days ago

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