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Most moving ballads ever!!


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Showing 151-175 of 1935 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2008 11:46:37 AM PDT
tony,
i would not have made it thru college without blossom dearie. late at night her boo-boop a doo voice made it all okay. her phrasing and song selection were superb. the counterpoint was oscar brown jr. who was also on the short list for good study music. i have never tired of blossom after 50 years. she's a keeper.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2008 12:00:26 PM PDT
I will check out Elvin Jones' version of "You've Changed". Haven't paid a lot of attention to Ravi Coltrane. That's just a deficiency on my part; not a comment on Ravi's talent. I saw Dexter do it and will never forget it.
Art Pepper on "Nature Boy"; Of course! Nat King Cole on it too. Great song...love the changes.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2008 12:01:57 PM PDT
Yes James. She still makes it "all OK" for me.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2008 1:02:06 PM PDT
A Listener says:
To Tony Hardwick:

I enjoy Blossom Dearie, although some of her song selections have not been to my taste. I used to get postcards from her when she had a new record available.

Eydie Gorme recorded "Guess Who I Saw Today". Probably others, also.

One to add to the list is, "Don't Go To Strangers", by Wesla Whitfield. Fine singer, fine song, without soaking the handkerchiefs.

Never liked Judy Garland's voice or emoting, except in "The Wizard Of Oz".

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2008 1:08:56 PM PDT
Yes, whether voice or instrumental, they do count as ballads, if the tempo is slow (and romantic or a lament).

Some ballads are played up tempo, which in my opinion, makes it a ballad not played as a ballad; just a different take on the here-to-for classic ballad. Conversely, some tunes intended to be up tempo are sometimes slowed down and played as a ballad. Not all up tempo tunes lend themselves to the ballad, however.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2008 1:28:44 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 6, 2008 8:20:56 AM PDT
Hey A Listener
If Edie sang it, did she pack emotion into it? That would give us a clue as to whether Steve had been fooling around.

Haven't heard Wesla whitfield's "Don't Go To Strangers". It's OK for grown men to cry though. Just do everybody a favor and throw away the soaked handkerchief....and for God's sake, don't let anyone see you cry.

Regarding Judy Garland, or any singer who emotes, that's one of my criteria. It tells me how real it is; what she/he is putting into the song. And Judy Garland probably did emote over the top, or under the bridge. She lived it. She was for real. Anyway, like her or not, "were (all) off to see the Wizard"!

On Serius Satellite Radio, Real Jazz, there is a recording that announces occasionally, "The Blues.....If you aren't living it, it won't come out your horn."

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2008 5:29:11 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 5, 2008 5:30:53 PM PDT
Mark says:
Ahmad - Awesome choices:
4- Autumn Leaves-Miles Davis from Addrely's Album "Somthin' Else". I love that intro, wonder if Gil Evans had anything to do with it? It seems to have his fingerprints on it. There may be something to this as Miles produced the record and for all intense purposes, this sounds like a Miles recording. Gil frequently had a hand in uncredited arrangements throughout Miles' career - from Boplicity all the way up through Star People!

5- Dearly Beloved-John Coltrane (not sure if this is a standard, but it brings tears to my eyes; its on Coltrane's album "Sunship"). One of my favorite Coltrane albums. I also like Attaining from this CD. Every heard Selflessness?

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2008 5:33:02 PM PDT
Bryce Jerlow says:
What you're saying is everyone in this or any forum ....

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2008 5:58:13 PM PDT
A Listener says:
To Tony Hardwick:

My point re Ms. Whitfield's performance was, that it was moving, without being, as stated by a prevous poster, "Oh, woe is me!" As for Garland, a singer can create emotional impact without setting her hair on fire.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2008 6:07:40 PM PDT
stevign says:
WHAT? Judy Garland set her hair on fire in the Wizard of Oz?..........Man, I gotta watch that movie again when I'm not on Acid!

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2008 7:22:56 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 5, 2008 8:03:17 PM PDT
Yes! Judy garland set her own hair on fire. She was actually the wicked witch, which most people didn't get. Judy/Dorothy, being the actual witch, had the ability to put out the fire and thusly set up the tornado scene. L. Frank Baum, the author, conveniently allowed the tornado to divert attention from the hair-on-fire incident, and to also cover up the fact that Dorothy was actually the wicked witch.

He later had the hair incident edited out of the film, thereby confining the hair-on-fire incident to Judy's on set trailer. You will notice that, after that, she had really really short hair; partly due to the fire, and partly due to her pulling out her own hair when emoting her torch songs. One further note that the general audience wasn't aware of, is that Owlsly was thrown out of Judy's trailer and banned from the set. Of course,she set herself on fire again later on during a flashback.

Get a grip, Stevign. YOU should know this.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2008 8:27:46 PM PDT
stevign says:
Tony! You mean the Bear was supplying dope to little ol' Dorothy? No wonder the show was in Technicolor!

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 5, 2008 9:11:55 PM PDT
Walt B says:
Three Favorites:
My One And Only Love-Coltrane/Hartman
My Way-Gene Ammons
Since I Fell For You-Lee Morgan

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 6, 2008 11:28:00 AM PDT
Mr. P says:
Talkin Wall....

Best get your napkin ready.....Somewhere over the Rainbow.......Sassy.....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4vfATcHunA

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 6, 2008 11:37:17 AM PDT
Mr. P says:
stevign,

I too updated my [my 4th copy!] of Kind Of Blue to the dual disc with CD side and a DVD side format. Dont forget the documentary also included the albums influence on more conemporary artists such as Q-Tip and Meshell N'Deocello.

And the sound.......

DAMN!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tpvpyb-PXM0

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 6, 2008 12:30:14 PM PDT
Mr. P says:
This bitter earth
Well, what fruit it bears
What good is love
mmmm that no one shares

And if my life is like the dust
oooh that hides the glow of a rose
What good am I
Heaven only knows

Lord, this bitter earth
Yes, can be so cold
Today you're young
Too soon, youre old...

But while a voice within me cries
I'm sure someone may answer my call
And this bitter earth
Ooooo may not
Oh be so bitter after all.

This Bitter Earth - Dinah Washington

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pf2aafM6ws4

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 6, 2008 12:39:39 PM PDT
Mr. P says:
Since I Fell For You - Lee Morgan
Since I fell For You - Nina Simone
Since I fell For You - Dinah Washington
Since I Fell For You - Mavis Staples.....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhBC6ZZQBpI

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 6, 2008 12:47:27 PM PDT
Jay Ambler says:
Eva Cassidy - Somewhere Over the Rainbow
and Songbird

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 6, 2008 3:48:21 PM PDT
Mr. C.

Yes, of course to all of those performers. And especially yes to the song itself. While I watched your youtube video, I scrolled down to listen to some of the others treating the same tune. One name really stuck out because I couldn't imagine him singing it; Mickey Dolenz, of The Monkeys. In their heyday they were a fake band doing a fake sitcom on TV and became popular in spite of their pseudo talent. Out of curiosity I clicked on it....Not half bad! He was accompanied by an electric keyboardist that made the sound tinny, but he actually did a good, bluesy job with a good voice and phrasing. I guess that goes to show you, anyone can come around and get hip when they grow up.

Now am I going to run out and buy the CD? Nope.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 6, 2008 3:51:24 PM PDT
stevign says:
Yeh, what's not to like?

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 6, 2008 4:02:11 PM PDT
stevign says:
Tony:

Michael Nesmith has matured into a damn fine songwriter/singer/musician:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvboZigVnYQ&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydNvjQTRSlU

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 6, 2008 5:21:14 PM PDT
Yeah, Stevign, I guess SO. I was living in my own bubble and they don't let me out too often.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 7, 2008 6:20:41 PM PDT
Joe Marquez says:
"One in a Million You," Larry Graham; and "I Keep it Hid," Linda Ronstadt.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2008 10:06:11 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 8, 2008 10:08:03 PM PDT
Nancy With the Laughing Face- Sinatra
Send In The Clowns-Sinatra

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 9, 2008 11:58:07 AM PDT
Mr. P says:
There was a boy
A very strange enchanted boy
They say he wandered very far, very far
Over land and sea
A little shy
And sad of eye
But very wise
Was he

And then one day
A magic day he passed my way
And while we spoke of many things, fools and kings
This he said to me
"The greatest thing
You'll ever learn
Is just to love
And be loved
In return"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLOPPv6GE7k

"The greatest thing
You'll ever learn
Is just to love
And be loved
In return"
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Discussion in:  Jazz forum
Participants:  160
Total posts:  1935
Initial post:  Apr 5, 2008
Latest post:  Jan 18, 2013

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