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Did Jesus Believe in Reincarnation?


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Showing 1-25 of 77 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Oct 9, 2009 7:49:15 AM PDT
Chris J says:
Jesus told his followers that he was the "Son of Man."

God referred to the prophet Ezekiel as the "Son of Man."

The events which Ezekiel described didn't happen in his life. So he must have been describing his own future life.

Wasn't Jesus therefore telling his followers that he was Ezekiel, in a later life?

The "End of Days" Cycle: A Modern Look at the Ancient Prophecy

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 26, 2009 1:32:40 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 26, 2009 1:33:01 PM PDT
(Hebrews 9:27)

"And inasmuch as it is appointed for men to die once and after this comes judgment"

No reincarnation.

Posted on Oct 26, 2009 2:55:38 PM PDT
athanasius says:
Chris J,

Jesus speaks precisely about this issue. Are you familiar with the passage where Jesus makes a connection between John the Baptist and Elijah? It wouldn't make much sense for him to say those things and then for us to wonder if Jesus was Elijah. Perhaps you could look up the passage in the gospels; it might be of assistance to you in this inquiry.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 26, 2009 3:08:18 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 26, 2009 3:08:33 PM PDT
Akhenaten says:
-It wouldn't make much sense for him to say those things and then for us to wonder if Jesus was Elijah

Do you mean Elisha? Could be important, Why did the onlookers think that Jesus was calling Elijah (not God)?

See reversing the waters, see double portion of spirit, see naassene scroll. See firmament (8th sphere)

And tell no one I mentioned this. :)

Posted on Oct 26, 2009 5:20:55 PM PDT
athanasius says:
Gosh, what a dolt I am! I read Ezekiel and then thought Elijah the whole time! I'm really sorry about that. That makes the question entirely different, obviously.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 27, 2009 10:19:16 AM PDT
Chris,

Each of the prophets both dealt with things in their particular generation and also spoke of times to come but this does not mean there would be reincarnation. For instance, Moses spoke of the time when Israel would rebel again from God and be sent into exile...Afterward, God would bring Israel back from exile and restore them through the covenant. Also, God said He would raise up prophets who are like Moses to whom the people were to listen and obey. This does not mean that Moses was reincarnated into each one of these guys...being tons of prophets functioned at the same time...

Jesus spoke specifically of God restoring the covenant through His death and resurrecting Him as the vindication of 1) His interpretation of the commandments were correct/ He is the Messiah/King and 2) we are restored through His teachings, prayers, and sacrifice....

there is more...but the simple answer is "No, the bible in no shape or form discusses reincarnation; only resurrection and God setting the affairs in order. The righteous to new service. The wicked to punishment."

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 28, 2009 3:41:36 PM PDT
Akhenaten says:
Huh? Nothing to be sorry about.

Posted on Nov 14, 2009 11:01:40 AM PST
a very intersting book to this is also:
Jesus The Book

there you can see how jesus thought about reincarnation-

have fun reading-

love kaurana

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 14, 2009 11:41:55 AM PST
Kevin Bold says:
"Wasn't Jesus therefore telling his followers that he was Ezekiel, in a later life?"

"Son of Man" is a prophetic title.

Posted on Nov 15, 2009 10:49:58 AM PST
NO I THINK REINCARNATION COMES FRON HINDOUISM

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 15, 2009 5:59:39 PM PST
Jesus gave himself a title shared by another individual, another prophet: Ezekiel. There is no evidence that Jesus was the reincarnation of anyone; rather, he was the Incarnation of God (see John 1, etc.)

Jesus taught the resurrection of the dead and lived it out through his own resurrection in space-time history. He came to die for the sins of the world; reincarnation teaches you come back to pay for your own sins or reap your own rewards. That negates the grace of God shown in Christ alone. We receive this with humble faith, knowing we cannot redeem ourselves and that we must live for Christ, the Lord of all.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 26, 2009 11:41:54 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 26, 2009 2:00:58 PM PST
Bennett F. says:
Chris wrote: Hebrews 9:27)

"And inasmuch as it is appointed for men to die once and after this comes judgment"

No reincarnation."

That can't be true. Lazarus died twice (John 11:1-44); the daughter of Jarius died twice (Luke 8:41-42, 49-55); Dorcas died twice (Acts 9:36-41); Eutychus died twice (Acts 20:9-10); the son of the widow of Nain died twice (Luke 7:11-15); the man whose body touched Elisha's bones died twice (2 Kings 13:20-21); the son of the Shunamite woman died twice (2 Kings 4: 32-25); the son of the widow from Zaphareth died twice (1 Kings 17:17-22).

And some men didn't die at all: Ezekial, Enoch, Melchizedek.

My point being: God can do anything--even making men suffer death twice, or to never suffer death. To state categorically that reincarnation doesn't exist means you're putting limits on God... Have an open mind.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 26, 2009 11:57:59 AM PST
Bennett F. says:
Reincarnation is a prominent theme of the Christian Gnostic gospels, as well as the Jewish Talmud, as well as in Islamic mysticism texts, as well as Buddhism, and of course Hinduism. In fact every major religion has reincarnation as a theme of its most secret doctrines--ie doctrines not capable of being understood by the common man. Mathew13:13 "Therefore speak I to them in parables: because they seeing see not; and hearing they hear not, neither do they understand."

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 26, 2009 12:06:34 PM PST
Bennett F. says:
Douglas G wrote: "He came to die for the sins of the world; reincarnation teaches you come back to pay for your own sins or reap your own rewards. That negates the grace of God shown in Christ alone. We receive this with humble faith, knowing we cannot redeem ourselves and that we must live for Christ, the Lord of all. "

Reincarnation does not negate the grace of God shown in Christ. Faith in salvation through grace saves you from having to reincarnate. It is the failure to accept Christ that dooms you to the endless cycles of life and death and having to face your karma again and again. But the beauty of salvation through grace is that at any time, you can accept Christ's sacrifice, and not have to continue trying to make it on your own through progressive lives. Christ saves us from obligatory karma and reincarnation.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 26, 2009 12:26:45 PM PST
Bennett F. says:
David H. wrote: "the simple answer is "No, the bible in no shape or form discusses reincarnation; only resurrection and God setting the affairs in order. The righteous to new service. The wicked to punishment."

I assume you're referring to the version of the Bible that was cobbled together by church politicians at the Council of Nicea in 326 A.D... Try subtituting the word "reincarnation" every time you see the word "resurrection" in the Bible. It makes a whole lot more sense that way. Any politician, even church politicians, are a breed to be distrusted. I'd rather read the Christian Gnostic gospels which are a more pure distillation of Jesus' teachings than the conferences of politicians trying to destroy any beliefs and creeds different to their own subjective interpretations. Even Jesus referred to John the Baptist as a reincarnation of Elijah (Matthew 11:7-14). You can argue that Jesus was not being literal when he talked of reincarnation--i.e he was talking about someone "like" Elijah in attitude and spirit. But you can't argue literal interpretation of the Bible only when it suits you, and non-literal interpretation when it doesn't. Why not take Jesus at his literal word? That John the Baptist was an incarnation of Elijah? Reincarnation seems to scare so many, whether in 326 A.D., or today. It shouldn't scare anyone who realizes that by accepting the salvation of Jesus Christ, you avoid all the ramifications of karma and reincarnation; only those who fail to grasp the gift are obliged to reincarnate and pay for their deeds through karma--which can never be done. Of course many reincarnate who do not have to--ie they've accepted Jesus' salvation. But they do so voluntarily to help friends or families, or the world, to find the same solution to reincarnation --which is faith in the sacrifice and salvation of Jesus Christ.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 26, 2009 2:26:14 PM PST
It is true as a general principle. Elisha went directly to heaven, but we have no evidence that Ezekial or Melchizedek did.

The point I was making was that after one's final death, there is one judgment, no reincarnation. The Bible teaches final judgment, not reincarnation. God is not free to contradict himself. He has told us what happens in the afterlife, and there is no evidence in the Bible or elsewhere for reincarnation. That is not a limit; that is truth to live by.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2010 5:41:26 AM PST
Bennett F.,

You say it "makes a whole lot more sense" when you substitute "reincarnation" every time you see the word "resurrection"...well who are you? You are a 21st century person (probably American)....not a first century Jew living in Judean and Galilee areas. Your viewpoint has been shaped by different things. Rather, what you need is knowledge and understanding to see Bible in its historical cultural settings.

You made the assertion that the Council of Nicea is some how responsible for the Jesus was resurrected rather than reincarnated. Well lets just look at that...

The bible claims Jesus (a first century Jew) is the Messiah who has been crucified at the hands of the Romans and then resurrected and enthroned in Heaven as the King of the whole created order. Now, did the first century Jews believe the Messiah (Son of David) would be killed at the hands of the Romans? No. To this day it is cause for the majority of Jews not to believe in Him.

Further, the whole world knows that a crucified messiah was a failed messiah. In the past, no person claiming to be the messiah believed his vocation lead to death which was his enthronement. Also, no follower of a killed messiah every continued to stay a follower of a crucified messiah. For example, with death Judah Maccabeus (Judah Maccabee) the movement found another relative to lead the movement. Likewise, with the death of Judas the Galilean the movement looked to his sons who were instrumental in the first revolt. Of Judas' three sons, Jacob and Simon fell as martyrs to their cause in opposing the Roman rule under Tiberius Alexander; his other son, Menahem, was the chief leader of the revolt in 66, and was slain on account of his tyranny by rivals in his own party when, surrounded with royal pomp, he went up to the Temple to be crowned (website: Jewish encyclopedia). The general set belief is that a dead messiah is a failed messiah, until Jesus. There is a couple text that point toward a suffering Messiah who will be vindicated, but until after Jesus no one was seriously interpreting those text that way...and even to this day many people don't. However, Jesus believed it was His vocation to die for Israel and God would vindicate Him through resurrection.

The early church did not treat Jesus as a failed messiah in spite of the crucifixion. If the early church wanted to go the regular way of going the closest relative, they had an obvious choose, James the brother of Jesus. James was instrumental in the church in Jerusalem. But at no point did the church claim James to be the messiah. Josephus records that James is the brother of the so-called Messiah, repeating what the people must have thought. Further, when the Roman Caesars persecuting the Christians and rounded up the relatives of Jesus, they did not make themselves to be a king or heir to the royal dynasty of Jesus to rule in the place of Jesus. Rather, they lived out Jesus' commandments and point to Jesus still being King.

So where did this belief of resurrection come from? The pagan world did not believe in resurrection. They believed in a disembodied exist after death, but never a bodily resurrection. Now, they did not myths about people returning to life. For instance, there was a myth that you could go down to the underworld and search out for your loved one. When you found that person, you began a journey back to physical world. But they put a stipulation about the journey back...if the person leading the soul back looked back at the soul, the soul disappear to never return. They had language and stories to say, "Yeah it would be nice to have your loved ones return but that does not actual happen." Now, the pagan world had lots of literature on ghost and spirits, that is not what bodily resurrection means.

What of the Jews? Some Jews, mainly the Sadducees, did not belief in an afterlife, certainly not a bodily life. Other Hellenized Jews, like Philo, believed in a glorious disembodied soul. But most Jews believed in a bodily resurrection at the renewal and judgment of all things which is a reflection of the present life.

The Jewish afterlife belief that is repeated in Christianity is a two stage event: 1) the soul goes into a temporary holding place 2) a bodily resurrection at the renewal of all of creation. But there are seven modifications to this because of Jesus:

1) Within early Christianity there is not a spectrum of beliefs about life after death and it is similar to Pharisaic Judaism. There is a virtual unanimity among early Christians. 2) During 2nd temple period, resurrection is important but it is that important. There is lots of Jewish literature among that time period and bodily resurrection is not central to it. But in early Christianity, bodily resurrection is the central their thoughts and beliefs. 3) The third modification is meaning of the bodily resurrection. Their some speculation what the body will be like in Jewish beliefs, but in Christianity the new body is a transformed body with new properties. It can be physically touched. It can eat. But it will be incapable of corruption or dying and it can go as it pleases. 4) Resurrection has split into two. It was believed in one event for all. However, Christians said it happened in advance in the middle of time with one person namely Jesus. 5) Because of the resurrection of Jesus, they believed that God has called us to work with God to implement the resurrection of Jesus and thereby to anticipate the final resurrection in all our aspects of life. 6) The different uses of the symbol of resurrection. As in Ezekiel 37, resurrection meant the symbolic restoration of Israel after exile. But the symbols where turned from Kingdom of Israel that was implemented the Moses' exodus to a that of baptism and new ethical behavior in the Kingdom of Heaven. Some reflected at what the symbols meant turned them to what they must now have to do. 7) Association to the Messiah. No one expect that the Messiah would die so no one thought He would be resurrected. There was a lot of scripture that the Christians appealed but no one was interpreting the scripture that way until after Jesus was resurrected. So the Messiahship was rethought around the resurrection because the resurrection constituted Jesus as the Messiah.

Jesus is the Lord of the Earth. Death was the final weapon of the tyrant, and Jesus conquered it. Resurrection is the achievement of Jesus to overthrow the powers and principalities of the world. Resurrection was not the thing that specifically implied ethnical behavior which the church has made resurrection into. It was the thing that landed people into jail and death through cruel means. Likewise, resurrection was always that trumpeted in spite of cruelty.

All of this supports and builds up the historical event in Jesus on that First Fruits Holiday. Since that first day, there is a huge range of winds of human trickery contesting the historical validate of this day. However, the gospel records a strange occurrence in items that were unexpected:

1) There is a strange silence of the gospels. The four gospels quote, allude, and symbolic represent a wide range of scriptures up until the point of resurrection. There is a bite of silence toward what happen. Yes, the epistles appeal that it was according to scriptures, but the gospel narratives record a strange silence of the people. This calls out to an early development of the story before a series scripture study and the astonishment of the disciples.

2) Women as the first witnesses of tombs. Women are not credible witness in the first century. Also, by the time Paul is telling the story 1 Corit. he appeals to men. But the gospels record women as the ones who first found the empty tomb.

3) Jesus, Himself, is not what the people expected. It would have been expected that Jesus would have been shining like the transfiguration, Moses, and Daniel says He would shine. However, Jesus looks quite normal. He eats and such...Also, He can be mistaken by a gardener or a guy on the road. However, very clearly the body is a transformed body. There is no biblical text to appeal to.

4) The gospels never talk about the future hope. In the epistles and many sermons, people make the resurrection into a future hope for us. However, the gospels do not handle the resurrection this way. Rather, they handled the resurrection as the vindication of Jesus as the Lord of the Earth, we are living in the new creation, and we have a job to do.

Now, it is the combined facts of the physical embodiment of Jesus and the empty tomb that bear witness to the bodily resurrection of Jesus. Many people have had strange experiences after with people who died. Each culture had language to describe this which was not resurrection. But if people wondered if a person was resurrected or not they would simply go to the tomb to see the body or the bones. The burial of the Jewish person was always a two phase burial. First stage is the placement of the body with spice to kill the smell and the second is the burning of the body and arrangement of the bones. People going to tombs were a common thing, especially those who martyred for God. Likewise, tomb robbery is a common thing. If the body or bones were missing it did not constitute resurrection, but it is the combined understand of both the accounts of the disciples interacting with the physical Jesus that acted in the physical world and the empty tomb that bear witness to the resurrection because Jesus is the First Fruit of New Creation.

The harvest season of Israel is begins with Passover with the redemption of the first born sons and end of slavery. This harvest is barley harvest which is the lesser harvest for the poor. During this harvest, the tribes presented a tithe to God as heave offering.

A heave offering (Hebrew: terumah), is a type of Korban (Biblical sacrifice), specifically a sacrifice which was a tithe. The term heave offering refers to the fact that such offerings were heaved (lifted) above the altar, as opposed to being waved around it, during their ritual. Heave offerings were the possession of the priests, and, if edible, could be eaten by their families, as well as the priests themselves if they were ritually pure. Apart of the heave offerings was the sacrifice/redemption of the firstborn male child.

Now, there is important text to appeal to for the resurrection and vindication of Jesus...as I have spoken to you earlier in the weeks. The anointed Servant, Messiah, would:

2 Samuel 7:8"Now then, tell my servant David, `...11 (conti.)" `The LORD declares to you that the LORD himself will establish a house for you: 12When your days are over and you rest with your ancestors, I will raise up your offspring to succeed you, who will come from your own body, and I will establish his kingdom. 14I will be his father, and he will be my son.

" `The stone the builders rejected has become the cornerstone; the Lord has done this, and it is marvelous in our eyes'? 24 The LORD has done it this very day; let us rejoice today and be glad.

The Builder of the House of God, the One to whom the new covenant come through, the One who would end the exile, and establish of the Kingdom in the new creation is the Son of Man whom God lifted up. And Jesus was vindicated on the day which God choose to lift up the firstborn sons of Israel of the beginning of the harvest of Israel.

Now ...you also say the Gnostic writings are "more pure distillation of Jesus' teachings". You are not the first to say this, nor will you be the last. However, the Gnostic writings express a Greek viewpoint which took things about Jesus and mixed them with Plato, Cicero, and others. Very simply because this is already a long post...The major praxis and symbols of the Gnostic writings are significantly different than that of the Bible which is to say that a Jew was and is wrapped around Temple, Land, Ethic identity, and Torah. Further, the major anticipation was that God was about to for Israel to redeem and vindicate Her and deal with the problem with creation through restoring the covenant. These are the things are the major themes of the Gospel. Things are missing in Gnostic writings which demonstrates that the Gnostic's weren't bible rooted nor centered in a Jewish world view.

Finally, the covenant sets up the covenant blessings and curses. It is through the covenant that we receive rewards and punishments. Read Deuteronomy (specifically Deut. 8)...it is God centered and covenant driven. The contemporary believes about karma are completely foreign to the Bible provisions. Karma says you do good things and good things will return to you. However, Bible says that God led Israel through the desert which is a waste land with dangerous animals and lack of food. God press down hard on Israel to see if Israel would obey the covenant. And Israel failed...and the covenant was broken...but God renewed it and brought them into the Land which was a covenant promise to confirm the covenant. Further, Israel was to take care to obey the covenant because it is through the covenant that they receive blessings.

There is more that can be said...but Please read carefully and weigh these things in your heart.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 7, 2010 3:25:08 PM PST
the_wanderer says:
Gilbert that is correct, that is where all the gabbering about Jesus believing in reincarnation is coming from, there are those that would like to reinterpret our Bible to make it serve Hinduism. But research the word "theosis" on the internet and you will find something from the Orthodox traditions that doesn't twist scripture but discusses a right relation with the Trinity.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2010 5:42:01 AM PST
Carl Martin says:
Jeremy Crockett said: "(Hebrews 9:27): 'And inasmuch as it is appointed for men to die once and after this comes judgment' ... No reincarnation."

/ / / Reply: / / /

Interpretation is such an interesting thing. Most interpretation is wrong, but who is right? From the point-of-view of reincarnation, a body (and the name or identity attached to it) lives only once and thus dies only once. That is as a general rule of thumb. And that incarnation is "judged." This does not preclude reincarnation. / / /

Rod Martin, Jr. / author of the upcoming book / "The Noah Mystery, God's Reason for the Flood"

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2010 6:16:26 AM PST
Carl Martin says:
David Holcomb Jr. said: "No, the bible in no shape or form discusses reincarnation; only resurrection and God setting the affairs in order. The righteous to new service. The wicked to punishment."

Reply:

"But I say unto you, That Elias is come already, and they knew him not, but have done unto him whatsoever they listed. Likewise shall also the Son of man suffer of them. Then the disciples understood that he spake unto them of John the Baptist" (Matthew 17:12-13, KJV).

Many places in the Bible, the Jews were expecting someone to be a reincarnated prophet. John the Baptist could not remember being Elias, but Jesus knew. He could see what John could not.

And could it be that "resurrection" is not bodily reanimation (zombies?), but reawakening of the spirit within (that which was created in the image of God)? Could it be that resurrection is the washing away the poison of the Forbidden Fruit and the restoration of the Tree of Life? That same Tree of Life (Garden of Eden) mentioned at the end of Genesis 3, is embedded in the next two chapters of the Bible's first book. Yes, there is a code there. God had said to Adam and Eve that they would surely die on the day they ate of the fruit, but Adam lived for at least another 800 years, according to Genesis 5. That spiritual death (not physical) was the great sleep that all of us suffer until we regain everlasting life (the Tree of Life), the spiritual immortality that is the "image" of God.

Rod Martin, Jr.
Author of the forthcoming book,
The Noah Mystery, God's Reason for the Flood
"God has never stopped loving all of his children."
http://www.GenesisCode.Net

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2010 6:44:00 AM PST
Carl Martin says:
Douglas Groothuis, Ph.D. said: "Jesus taught the resurrection of the dead..."

Reply:

My grandfather was a Southern Baptist minister and missionary to Africa. I always had a problem with his sermons talking about resurrecting the dead. I couldn't picture zombies as part of the Christian future. ;-)

When Jesus told Nicodemus about being "born again," it wasn't about physical re-birth, but about spiritual reawakening. Everlasting life is about awakening the immortal within (that which was created in the image of God). Now it must be said, that immortal has been around for a very, very long time. God wants His children back, and He would not have let the last several million years go by wasted. Reincarnation was in His best interest to allow the few awakenings which have already occurred.

Rod Martin, Jr.
Author of the forthcoming book,
The Noah Mystery, God's Reason for the Flood
"God has never stopped loving all of his children."
http://www.GenesisCode.Net

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2010 7:14:40 AM PST
Carl Martin says:
Douglas Groothuis, Ph.D. said: "The Bible teaches final judgment, not reincarnation. God is not free to contradict himself. He has told us what happens in the afterlife, and there is no evidence in the Bible or elsewhere for reincarnation. That is not a limit; that is truth to live by."

Reply:

Certainly God does not contradict Himself. Yet mortal humans are free to interpret all manner of interesting versions of the same "elephant" (allusion to the six blind men).

Some looked at the Bible and saw justification for the Inquisition, the Crusades, and for stoning Jesus. To think that one has already achieved Truth is to take on a touch of blindness. Have faith, yes. The Truth is there and Jesus and God are there to help. Unless one can already walk on water, one has not yet achieved that Truth in all its glory. You don't need to prove it to anyone else. Such miracles are only between you and God.

Jesus talked about reincarnation on several occasions, though the term "reincarnation" was not used. Jesus also mentions karma, but without using the term. Those who live by the sword will die by the sword. Jesus wasn't lying about this, but there are too many examples of criminals dying in their comfortable old age. When do they get their sword? Naturally, next lifetime.

There are three passages on the "sins of the fathers" (Numbers 14:18, Exodus 20:5, and Deuteronomy 5:9). The Numbers version has always been my favorite. "The LORD is longsuffering, and of great mercy, forgiving iniquity and transgression, and by no means clearing the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation" (KJV).

That God is "longsuffering" means to me that God is patient, and that the sword does not need to come right away. God has great mercy, but how could He be merciful by making children pay for the crimes of their ancestors? The most telling portion for me is the "third and fourth generation." This gives the perpetrator (the "father") enough time to live out his life, die, be reincarnated, and grow up to be old enough to appreciate the boomerang headed his way -- a boomerang he had thrown in his prior life.

Why do we have karma and reincarnation? Not as any kind of cruel punishment. Every "bad" thing that happens to us is a blessed opportunity to awaken. The hardened heart of the criminal may be softened by his "new life." He may come to ask, "Why God is this happening to me?" With such a question, the door is open and the possibility for salvation is at hand.

Rod Martin, Jr.
Author of the forthcoming book,
The Noah Mystery, God's Reason for the Flood
"God has never stopped loving all of his children."
http://www.GenesisCode.Net

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2010 7:57:46 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 12, 2010 8:05:07 AM PST
Bennett F. says:
In reply to Douglas Groethius Phd: The point I was making was that You seem to interpret the Bible literally when it suits you, then turn around and interpret it metaphorically when that suits your argument. You take the verse literally about being appointed to die only once as an argument against reincarnation; then you turn around and refuse to take the verses literally about John the Baptist being a reincarnation of Elias. I don't claim to know the answers to these questions, but I do enjoy the philosophical discussion.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 12, 2010 8:02:19 AM PST
Bennett F. says:
In reply to Carl Martin: Best post on this discussion yet. You've got me anticipating your book with eagerness.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 18, 2010 10:47:34 AM PST
To Carl or Rod,

Sorry...you have your elephant which you will try to make money off of it. Nevertheless, I laid out a full form resurrection argument with the historical proof detailed in the bible. You have not refuted it...merely passed by it without a notice. So either, challenge the historical work or say it is valid.
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