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Questions that non-Jews may have about Orthodox Jewish practices

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In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 8:12:34 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 17, 2012 8:30:29 AM PDT
jeffesq613 says:
That may be, but I think most po's'kim would allow timers to be used for other things that were necessary and would enhance the Shabbos.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 8:15:41 AM PDT
jeffesq613 says:
You're welcome.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 8:19:43 AM PDT
jeffesq613 says:
Big Shmooz's answer was better. It has to do with the halakhic issues involved with absorption of taste into the posts and dishes and then that taste being absorbed into hot food placed on the same dishes or cooked in the same pots. One should note that in this regard the halakhic facts may not correspond completely with accepted scientific fact today. The halakhah nevertheless must be observed, but the scientific reality may be a factor used by a halakhic authority in evaluating an "after the fact" situation.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 8:20:10 AM PDT
jeffesq613 says:
Yes.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 8:23:11 AM PDT
jeffesq613 says:
I thought I did make that point in my post, but you did elaborate on it greatly.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 8:25:39 AM PDT
jeffesq613 says:
It's incorrect, because different Sephardic groups have differing customs. For example, some do not eat rice. Some do. It depends largely on what country they came from.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 8:26:51 AM PDT
jeffesq613 says:
Look at the translation in your ArtScroll Siddur.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 8:28:32 AM PDT
jeffesq613 says:
An oven, an air conditioner, a television set - pretty much anything electrical.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 8:28:46 AM PDT
jeffesq613: The halakhah nevertheless must be observed, but the scientific reality may be a factor used by a halakhic authority in evaluating an "after the fact" situation.

Me: So, does this mean that halakhah can be 'revised' as science brings different fact to light than the facts that were before the rabbi's who originally wrote it?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 8:35:54 AM PDT
jeffesq613 says:
Sometimes yes and sometimes no. There isn't a universal answer to that question. This is one area that has puzzled me for years. I do wonder if some of the resistance is the reluctance to say that the Sages of the Talmud were wrong in assessing the absorption quality of certain materials. I think some of that could be explained away because of technological changes in the materials we use today. The Rabbis of the Talmud, for example, never saw a piece of stainless steel and they probably never saw a metal pot that was so smooth that it did not contain nooks and crannies that were nearly impossible to clean. So I have difficulty understanding why there has not been more of an attempt to adapt these laws to the newer reality.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 8:39:06 AM PDT
Balok: Given the postulate that the Torah was literally given by God to Moses, it follows immediately that there cannot be any extra words therein. Thus, if there is a word or phrase that *seems* to be extraneous, God must have put it there to teach us something.

Me: Thanks for bringing this up. I think Shmooz did actually say something about this at one point (either in this thread or another), but it wasn't something I would have even given a thought to without it being brought to my attention.

I'm actually in a curious position in regards to 'Old Testament' theology. I'm a Christian Qabalist, so I do believe the Torah was given to Moses letter by letter (as confirmed emphatically by Jesus): the 'oral Torah', not so much. But the 'hidden' Qabalistic things I'm more likely to believe than not. I don't hold The Bahir, The Sefer Yetzirah, or The Zohar to be near the level of God-breathed Scripture, but my experience has validated what I've learned so far. So I suppose I'm like someone accepting the two ends of a spectrum but leaving out the middle.

Or maybe I'm just thinking too much (as I'm told I'm wont to do).

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 8:50:09 AM PDT
I could actually see that making things a complete mess...

<Monty Python voice>: You shalt not use the same vessel to cook both dairy and meat unless it be made of Teflon(tm) of the 2nd generation or later. Stainless steel vessels may be used, providing that there be no cuts, scrapes or other imperfections in the work. Your grandmother's cast iron skillet is right out.

All humor aside, basing it on what it and what is not 'absorbtive' would probably end up with you keeping three sets of cookware instead of two. And while I may not agree with the reasoning that got your there, it does keep with the 'separation' theme that runs throughout the Torah (don't mix crops, materials in your clothes, etc...).

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 9:03:55 AM PDT
jeffesq613 says:
Believe me, that's no more complicated than halakhah is already.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 9:12:01 AM PDT
Probably the most common use is lawn sprinklers.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 9:14:16 AM PDT
I keep three sets. :)

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 9:47:26 AM PDT
yba says:
Youo very well may have, Hanalah, sometimes I cofuse or conflate similar stories I have read/heard about over the the years. The underlying shame is the hurt that is caused to all involved.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 9:51:30 AM PDT
yba says:
Thank you for your post, Hanalah. You have expressed teh orthodox point of view very well. I do consider the Reform conversion likely not to follow orthox halachot but where you and I differ is I believe the Reform have the right to the dignity of their difference and their own halacha. The will answer to G-d and not to Orthodox practitioners.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 9:55:43 AM PDT
yba says:
My post, Hanalah, was not speaking of onewithot the other, but the complentary aspects of both being on the same plane or spectrum. There are those who emphasize one over the other tothe point of making virtually null and void the other. It is this I disagree with.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 9:57:03 AM PDT
yba says:
Thank you, Hanalah, and I do wish that for all that pursue He who is our Holy One.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 10:00:31 AM PDT
yba says:
Consider an oncologist who sees a patient complaining they have cancer and wish to be treated. If the doctor knows this not to be the case, would h e not refer the person elsewhere, to doctor of another specialty for the help that he knows he cannot provide as the individual will not accept his diagnosis?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 10:08:06 AM PDT
yba says:
Actually, I am just trying to get a read on orthodox undestanding. Why would Reform or any sect outside the Orthodox be constrained to the Orthodox siddur? I have no complaints ffrom my rabbi to me using my old companion siddur which came from a chababd bookstore for my daily morning prayers.
I am asking why Orthodox have a problem with it, if they do, do they not believe that Reform has the right to determine their rights of worship?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 10:32:36 AM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Jun 17, 2012 11:29:34 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 10:38:58 AM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Jun 17, 2012 11:29:41 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 11:01:43 AM PDT
Omnireader says:
Perhaps we could have a Reform thread where your questions could be answered and not take away from questions about Orthodox Jewish practices.

In any event, respect for Judaism is the key. Nobody should feel they are defending something, only explaining it.

If you go to the Jewish Unity thread most of your questions have already been answered.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 11:02:47 AM PDT
Omnireader says:
Well Said.
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Discussion in:  Judaism forum
Participants:  44
Total posts:  10000
Initial post:  Mar 23, 2012
Latest post:  Aug 16, 2012

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