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IS THEIR ANY GOOD SERIES!!


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Initial post: Apr 7, 2007 9:54:53 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 14, 2007 1:46:06 PM PDT
Misty. says:
ok im lookin for a relly good seires

ive already read
1. Warriors
2. Gregor the Overlander
3. Pendragon
so plzzz if you know any good series
tell me bout them!
im desprate!!

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 8, 2007 6:29:08 PM PDT
Noodleheart says:
Um the Eragon and Eldest books are good. If you like warriors maybe "The Capture" and the rest of that series. You can just wait until the next warriors books come out by reading those.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 8, 2007 11:33:14 PM PDT
Bruise Bane says:
To start with the obvious:

1. Harry Potter

and then:

2. Percy Jackson & The Olympians
3. Artemis Fowl
4. His Dark Materials
5. The Last Apprentice
6. Young Wizards Series
7. The Dark is Rising
8. The Spiderwick Chronicles
9. A Series of Unfortunate Events
10. The Chronicles of Prydain

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 9, 2007 8:04:11 AM PDT
1. Harry Potter Series
2. The Septimus Heap Series
3. The Alex Rider Series
4. The Inkheart Trilogy
5. The Ranger's Apprentice Series
6. The Young Bond Series
7. Eragon & Eldest
8. A series of unfortunate events.
um... that's all i can think of right now.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 9, 2007 9:54:34 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 9, 2007 11:34:36 AM PDT
Wow. Narnia and The Hobbit should go high above both those lists.
Ok The Hobbit isn't a series but by the time you finish it you'll have learned enough literarilly to go on to the Lord of the Rings.
And the Brian Jaques Redwall series deserves a spot at the top beside Harry Potter.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 9, 2007 12:27:52 PM PDT
Bruise Bane says:
The Hobbit was boring in my opinion, I personally don't think Tolkien's writing is very exciting. I know many people will disagree with me about that. I don't believe just because a story was written many years ago it makes it better than what is being written today.

And about Narnia, I did enjoy it, it just slipped my mind. I wouldn't put it above Harry Potter, but it deserves my #2 spot.

And about Redwall, does this discussion - "Any Redwall Fans?" - have anything to do with you believing it deserves to be next to HP.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 9, 2007 12:43:40 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 9, 2007 12:53:58 PM PDT
"I don't believe just because a story was written many years ago it makes it better than what is being written today."

I agree, being an author writing today myself. But if "The Hobbit" were written today instead of in the 60s, it would still be the most interesting, imaginative and well-written children's fantasy ever created. However, if that were the case none of the others you mentioned would be around because they ALL stole their inspiration from Tolkien and without him, they couldn't have been written. Pretty much anyone writing fantasy owes a portion of their inspiration to the great J.R.R., and anyone who has the word "orc" or even "elf" in a fantasy tale and says different is pretty much being dishonest. Before Tolkien, elves were only in fairy tales, and fantasy wasn't even an established genre. People forget how much of what we call fantasy is actually just a continuation of the wellspring that was Tolkien's unmatched imagination.
About Redwall- the post you mentioned inspired me to read it. I'm only half way through and I can already tell it's at least as good as H.P.
And btw, H.P. owes more than a nod to "Witches, Ghosts, and Goblins: The Spooky Search for Miranda's Cat."
Rowlings is a great writer, but a new Tolkien she is not.
You can compare Stephen King to Edgar Allen Poe too, but no well-read person is going to listen.
It's like comparing Aerosmith to Mozart. I'm sure lots of people like Aerosmith better, but that doesn't make Aerosmith fine art. Comparing pop music to orchestration is futile, just as futile as comparing popular fiction to literature.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 9, 2007 1:10:19 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 9, 2007 1:11:21 PM PDT
Bruise Bane says:
Most of the series I mentioned were not inspired by Tolkien. Most of those don't have elves, and I don't think any of them have orcs.

Tolkien was great at creating his made-up land and giving it a thorough history to make it almost believable. But, I don't think Tolkien was a great writer. I feel that his stuff is semi-boring, and I had to force myself to keep reading in many spots.

I agree, JKR is not a new Tolkien, and that's because her series is completely different from the Hobbit and LOTR. I don't like to consider any author the "new" anybody, I believe they all have there own stories and identities.

Of course they owe something to Tolkien, but also to many other authors as well. Tolkien didn't invent the genre. And he definitely owes something to the authors before him like: George MacDonald, William Morris, Lord Dunsany, even Robert E. Howard came before Tolkien.

BTW, this is the 9-12 age discussion board. I would recommend Tolkien in adult boards but not here. I think the old writing style that Tolkien uses might be difficult for kids in this age group.

Oh yeah, for the original poster I would recommend "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" & "Through the Looking Glass" by Lewis Carroll.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 9, 2007 1:36:20 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 9, 2007 1:48:41 PM PDT
I second the motion on Lewis Carrol. I loved it as a kid and have recently thought about picking up "The Annotated Alice" to see what I missed when I read it the first time.
However, "The Hobbit" is a children's book, so Tolkien has every right to be discussed here. Lewis wrote adult stuff too, and you don't have any problem with mentioning him.
George McDonald, William Morris, and Lord Dunsany were fantasy writers before or contemporary with Tolkien, but I was talking about fantasy "as we know it today."
I.E. There are no flying dragons, dwarves, elves, or orcs in Howard. In fact, there's very little of anything even remotely LIKE that in Howard. But 99.9% of modern fantasy authors have at least SOME of those things in their works. Dungeons and Dragons, Shannara, and Eragon border on downright Tolkien plagiarism.
But I guess I'm just reacting to the unknown. I just can't imagine, no matter what way I try to look at it objectively, how anyone could find the Hobbit boring. At the age of 12 I was so engrossed in every word that I couldn't even HEAR my mother when she called me for dinner. No book before or since has hypnotized me so completely.
And if any of those books you mentioned have elves in them that are over a few inches tall, then they were inspired by Tolkien.
I realize that the non-fantasy books you mentioned weren't inspired by Tolkien. What I meant when I said that Rowlings is not the new Tolkien was that she is not in the same league with Tolkien as far as literary merit and imagination goes, and I meant to clarified with the analogy of Poe and King and Mozart and Aerosmith.
By the way, I like Rowlings alot. I even like some Aerosmith and King every once and a while. I'm not trying to put them down. I'm sure they'd laugh too if they overheard someone trying to compare them to their idols.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 9, 2007 1:50:30 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 9, 2007 2:05:11 PM PDT
Bruise Bane says:
I didn't say Tolkien can't be discussed, I just think some kids might find it difficult to understand his writing. Lewis did write adult stuff, but I only mentioned Alice. And Tolkien wasn't the first one to write about elves being a relative size to humans.

Of course, many authors today were inspired by Tolkien, as Tolkien was inspired by authors before him (MacDonald, Morris, and Dunsany were all before Tolkien), and authors in the future will be inspired by the authors of today, that's just how it works. I've have already seen many books today that were obviously inspired by Harry Potter.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 9, 2007 2:18:54 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 9, 2007 2:26:16 PM PDT
Yep definitely and publishers are running to put them on the shelf before they've even been edited.
Take "Dragon Slayer's Academy" for instance. Or don't; you'll be better off if you never have to even look at it.

Another one I thought of is "Watership Down."
IMO it's possibly the second best fantasy for kids of all time. But some might find it harder than average reading for the YA crowd, and it never had a chance as far as Potter-like popularity goes because the main character was a rabbit and not a boy or a girl.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 9, 2007 2:23:16 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 9, 2007 4:27:47 PM PDT
Bruise Bane says:
You're exactly right. I used the word "inspired", when I should have used "plagiarized" or "copied". Most of them are worthless authors trying to make a profit off of the HP hysteria.

I have found a few rare gems though.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 9, 2007 2:28:42 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 9, 2007 6:20:00 PM PDT
If I were a publisher I'd forget about those copy-cats and instead find the rights to "Witches, Ghosts, and Goblins" and market it as the Godfather of Harry Potter! (Like they did with neil Young when Grunge came out).

I haven't read it but that Abacar series looks ok.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 9, 2007 9:01:50 PM PDT
S. Lewis says:
The Lightening Thief and The Sea of Monsters are both really good, and the third book in the series, The Titan's Curse comes out next month!

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 9, 2007 9:05:38 PM PDT
Noodleheart says:
If you like Redwall, they suggest warriors. It says they are similar. If you decide to read the warriors series, go to "Warriors: the power of three" that is where our main chat base is.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 10, 2007 12:59:30 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 10, 2007 1:01:26 PM PDT
I think a really great series of books for someone your age (or any age really) is the charlie bone series. I have been reading them and I really love them and I am 23 but they are really great. it's by jenny nimmo and the site for the books is here http://www.scholastic.com/charliebone/

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 10, 2007 5:54:21 PM PDT
T. Resnick says:
I would recommend Susan Cooper's series, The Dark Is Rising. It begins with Over Sea, Under Stone. There are four books in the series. It's exciting, scary, and very, very engrossing. Some of the best writing I've found.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 10, 2007 9:06:01 PM PDT
TC Bookbug says:
Check out the Uncommon Adventures of Tucker O'Doyle by Jason Rider.

Book 1 & 2 are out and 3 is coming soon.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 13, 2007 6:09:19 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 13, 2007 6:16:13 AM PDT
Angela says:
Anything by John Bellairs. My favorite series is the one with Lewis Barnavelt and Rose Rita Pottinger:

The House With a Clock In Its Walls
The Figure in the Shadows
The Letter, the Witch and the Ring
The Ghost in the Mirror
The Whistle, the Grave and the Ghost
The Specter From the Magician's Museum
The Doom of the Haunted Opera
The Beast Under the Wizard's Bridge
The Vengeance of the Witch-Finder
The House Where Nobody Lived

Some of these are completed by Brad Strickland or completely written by him after John Bellairs' death. The Johnny Dixon series is really good too, but there are too many of those to list! Happy reading!

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 13, 2007 4:27:36 PM PDT
starfish says:
Just a little FYI for young readers: DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES TORTURE YOURSELF BY TRYING TO READ THE AWFUL, AWFUL SERIES THAT IS CHARLIE BONE.
I think that it should be required that before someone starts writing children's books, they need to be a good author. Jenny Nimmo is the most awful writer of children's books ever. By writing **** like this, she insults the genre and humiliates those of us trying to read a decent book. Furthermore, her plot, characters, and setting are a blatant rip-off of Harry Potter. Examples: the setting- a bording school for people with magical gifts (Hogwarts, anyone?). The characters- average boy with a missing father and unruly hair, with one best friend who is a boy and one who is a girl (Harry?). The mysterious mentor/relative (Sirius). The sometimes wimpy archnemisis at school who happens to come from a long line of weirdo freaky magical people (Draco Malfoy). And lastly, the plot- average boy with mysterious and just discovered magical powers must go to an ancient magical school, makes friends and enemies, runs around solving mysteries, gets into trouble with weird custodian who is almost exacly like JK Rowling's Filtch, finds a wand, frees a young girl from an evil spell... must i go on?
Please, please, please, if you must read a book like this, read Harry Potter. Put Charlie back on the shelf, or chuck him into the nearest garbage can and do us all a favor. Jenny Nimmo should be immidiately arrested for crimes against humanity.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 14, 2007 11:43:59 AM PDT
Eragon and Eldest are two of the worst books in contemporary fantasy. They are plagiaristic and very poorly written. Don't waste your time with them.

There were some good suggestions here, but I was surprised that nobody mentioned the Earthsea trilogy (later, Earthsea Cycle) by LeGuin. That's every bit as classic as Tolkien.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 14, 2007 11:48:43 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 14, 2007 11:50:14 AM PDT
What you've just done is not drawn analogies to Harry Potter, but to fantasy in general. Rowling was borrowing from heavily used themes herself.

I've communicated with Ms. Nimmo on several occasions, and while that hardly makes me an expert, she has stated that she has never read the Potter series. Apparently, she doesn't read much fantasy, and even less children's/YA fantasy. Remember that these two women are drawing on the same myths to create their stories, so similarities shouldn't be all that surprising.

And it was her publisher, not her, that insisted on calling the books, "Charlie Bone and the..." etc, to force people into thinking that it was similar to Harry Potter.

The Charlie Bone stories certainly don't belong to the finest of all YA literature (I would say they're quite good, though), but crimes against humanity? Please don't tell me that you've read Eragon and Eldest, and found them to be good.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 14, 2007 11:57:42 AM PDT
K. Walgrave says:
The Edge Chronicles is a good series. You might like to read them.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 15, 2007 2:14:49 PM PDT
R. Schultz says:
Twilight series by Stephenie Meyer
Uglies series by Scott Westerfeld
Peeps series by Scott Westerfeld
Maximum Ride series by James Patterson

All pretty good books!!

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 15, 2007 5:16:18 PM PDT
Amy Brock says:
James, I have read all those books and here are some books that I like that are fantasy series and kind of like those mentioned by you and others.

Shadow Children by Margaret Peterson Haddix
Guardians of Ga'Hoole by Kathryn Lasky is like Warriors, but about owls.
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Divide by Elizabeth Kay
Deltora quest by Emily Rodda
The Pit Dragon Trilogy by Jane Yolen
On The Run by Gordon Korman ( a bit short, but there are a lot of them)
Book of the Stars by Erik L'Homme
The Merlin series by T. A. Barron
Peter and the Starcatchers by Dave Barry
Wind on Fire Trilogy by William Nicholson
Mistmantle Chronicles by M. I. McAllister
Lionboy Trilogy by Zizou Corder

I put some more obscure books down because all the obvious books are already mentioned, and I love and have read most of those already mentioned books and think you should definitally read them, maybe even before you read the ones above.

P.S. Charlie Bone is good, regardless of whether or not it is a ripoff of Harry Potter, which it doesn't sound like it is, if T. Burger is correct. Eragon and Eldest are good too, ripoffs they may be, but they're interesting and entertaining ripoffs and I like them.
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Discussion in:  Juvenile Fiction forum
Participants:  83
Total posts:  106
Initial post:  Apr 7, 2007
Latest post:  Jul 22, 2007

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