Customer Discussions > Kindle Book forum

proofreading, or lack thereof


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-25 of 155 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Feb 17, 2013 7:56:20 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Feb 17, 2013 2:02:53 PM PST]

Posted on Feb 17, 2013 8:07:59 AM PST
vkb says:
I am very tired of finding mistakes in books. I just paid $9.99 for a Barbara Pym novel (an outrageous price) written in plain, simple English, only to discover several typos and misprints. The situation always seems to be worse in self-published books--in these cases I hold the authors to some responsibility. Certainly these authors are responsible for decent grammar. But Amazon/Kindle is ultimately responsible for correct spelling and printing. The overall increase I seem to see in prices should reflect an increase in quality if nothing else.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2013 8:27:30 AM PST
Miss M says:
No, it's not Amazon that's responsible, it's the publishers - but I do agree with you they often do a terrible job on the back-catalog reprints *and* charge a lot for it. That being said, Open Road is probably the largest reprint house I can think of and IMO they generally do a pretty decent job. I'd recommend you let Open Road and Amazon know your dissatisfaction. Return the book from the Manage Your Kindle page; report the formatting issues on the Amazon book page (down at the bottom, light blue text-box); and contact Open Road via their website. JMO.

The problem with un-edited self-published books is a whole 'nother thing...and there's plenty of discussion on that subject around here...

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2013 8:44:41 AM PST
I believe if you call the problem to the attention of Amazon, they will notify the publisher and may even pull the book until it's fixed. Wouldn't hurt to try.

Posted on Feb 17, 2013 8:57:08 AM PST
With reprints, this problem isn't limited to ebooks. I just finished a Moyer Bell reprint of Angela Thirkell's Wild Strawberries, and while the book itself was absolutely delightful, the reprint was awful. The publisher should be embarrassed to have its name on that kind of product.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2013 9:14:39 AM PST
Miss M says:
Achhh...you raise my hopes & dash them all in one sentence...thought you were saying the Thirkells are on kindle. For some stupid reason, I got rid of my copies of her books over the years and really regret it. I haven't ever read the complete set, would love to start from scratch again now...
I do have a 1997 Moyer Bell copy of 'Private Enterprise' which is fine, but I guess it depends on where they get their 'original' files from.

Posted on Feb 17, 2013 9:24:00 AM PST
Marion Stein says:
It's pretty bad with public domain stuff as well. The "respectable" publishers have gotten better with conversion, but a lot of the versions are "self-published" not by the original and long-dead authors, but by anyone who wants to declare him/herself a publisher. In addition to sometimes using really clumsy old translations, a lot of these versions are scanned and in the conversion letters may be replaced by the wrong letter or a non-letter character or something.

Also, when an SP book or micro-press published book becomes a bestseller (like Fifty-Shades for example) the publishers that pick it up don't seem to want to mess with whatever it was that made it successful and don't really edit or even take out typos.

I'm finding more typos than I used to in trad published books and e-books. My theory is this has to do with more reliance on programs to find errors than on hiring human beings to proof-read. It also may be an economic calculation. To go over each manuscript as carefully as each manuscript should be gone over is more expensive, and if the public is less demanding about this than it used to be, why do it?

Amazon is neither a publisher nor a "traditional" bookstore. Old fashioned bookstores have book buyers who look at the volumes and don't take books with typos in them. However, if you actually return the book AND complain to Amazon, they may take off that book or edition. Within their TOS for authors and publishers, they can pull stuff that doesn't meet a standard.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2013 9:26:46 AM PST
I wish they were on kindle. I hear Virago is reprinting, so, fingers crossed.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2013 10:06:09 AM PST
Miss M says:
I saw those on Amazon UK (and I'm in love with the covers...)
I should take my own advice and get busy contacting the publishers. :)

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2013 1:57:45 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 17, 2013 1:58:41 PM PST
vkb says:
Thanks for the info. I will follow up, and also I will follow this forum to learn what the issues are.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 18, 2013 10:11:25 AM PST
"Also, when an SP book or micro-press published book becomes a bestseller (like Fifty-Shades for example) the publishers that pick it up don't seem to want to mess with whatever it was that made it successful and don't really edit or even take out typos."

I don't think that's a universal approach. I know a few people who have gotten picked up and subsequently had their books pulled for a few months while they went through new rounds of editing. Probably depends on both the publisher and contract details.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 18, 2013 11:10:12 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 18, 2013 11:12:21 AM PST
Marion Stein says:
Sorry, didn't mean to disparage. You are probably right. I wasn't thinking of books that did well and got picked up. I was thinking specifically of mega-bestsellers where big publishers were out for quick big bucks.

The confusion might be over the term "bestseller." I don't mean books that sell a few or even tens of thousands of copies and attract attention. I meant authentic best sellers.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 19, 2013 7:40:54 AM PST
I have to disagree that Amazon is responsible. Amazon is a book seller. It's the publisher's responsibility to provide a well edited book. When you buy a book from a bookstore would you blame them for typos?

Amazon does provide a way to report errors as you find them. If you select a phrase you can select More in the pop-up menu and then select Report Content Error.

I just realized this was there yesterday and I reported my first error. After doing so it says that it will be inspected by one of their quality control staff and that I can follow the progress of that in Manage Your Kindle. I'm looking forward to finding out if anything is done.

The error I reported was the word "forgotten" spelled as "for gotten" and the context makes the error pretty obvious so something should come of it. We shall see.

Barry

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 19, 2013 10:24:13 AM PST
vkb says:
You are absolutely correct about who is responsible for printed material. Thank you for the information about reporting of errors in printed material to Amazon. I look forward to hearing about the results of your endeavor.

vkb

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 19, 2013 10:46:07 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 19, 2013 10:46:34 AM PST
K. Rowley says:
"I have to disagree that Amazon is responsible. Amazon is a book seller. It's the publisher's responsibility to provide a well edited book."

Keep in mind, that Amazon is a publisher too these days... They publish under several names; 47North, Thomas & Mercer, Montlake Romance, AmazonEncore, AmazonCrossing, and Amazon Children's Publishing...

Amazon Publishing
http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?ie=UTF8&docId=1000664761

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 19, 2013 3:21:51 PM PST
HJ Leonard says:
Yes, but Amazon is a publisher in the sense that they provide the online platform for self-pubbers to upload their books, not that they edit, etc...Massive difference.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 19, 2013 4:08:44 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Feb 19, 2013 4:11:37 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 19, 2013 4:36:12 PM PST
K. Rowley says:
"Yes, but Amazon is a publisher in the sense that they provide the online platform for self-pubbers to upload their books, not that they edit, etc...Massive difference."

Actually - they are a real publishing house... go visit the page I linked to..

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 19, 2013 7:31:26 PM PST
i've actually seen a few of their Montlake books in my library

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 19, 2013 7:31:59 PM PST
that being said, my experience with their branded books, they have been pretty high quality - i haven't seen many mistakes in them

Posted on Feb 20, 2013 4:06:53 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 20, 2013 4:07:13 AM PST
Irish reader says:
I think it's important to make a distinction between Amazon's publishing arm and how they provide a platform for people to sell goods. Self-published work would fall under the latter category - as evidenced by the item description: self-published work is 'sold by' Amazon, nothing more - they have a disclaimer to that effect under Terms and Conditions.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 20, 2013 1:03:48 PM PST
Amazon is a real publishing house, but those services are only for those signed by them. For all others there's an independent contractor relationship.

Posted on Feb 20, 2013 3:10:15 PM PST
R. Jimenez says:
I just finished reading Warbreaker by Brandon Sanderson on my Kindle and was horrified at the number of typos and mistakes. There were multiple mistakes in each chapter and there are more than 50 chapters in this book. These mistakes ranged from having spaces inserted in the middle of words to having the last sentence of the previous chapter repeated at the end of the next chapter. There was no quality control for this. At all. From the previous posts I would guess that Tor publishing would be to blame. if anyone has any insight on this I would appreciate it.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 20, 2013 3:31:45 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 20, 2013 3:32:20 PM PST
HJ Leonard says:
Yes, and this is what Amazon has to say about what they 'publish':

"Amazon Publishing innovates on behalf of authors and readers, bringing exceptional books to audiences in physical and Kindle formats. We use a combination of customer feedback, data, and editorial judgment to identify new and previously published books we think readers will love, then partner with authors to publish, market, and distribute their work into multiple channels and formats. "

They don't seem to provide editorial services, etc.

Posted on Feb 20, 2013 3:40:38 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 20, 2013 3:41:06 PM PST
here is a link from Montlake that has a specific quote from one of the editors - http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?ID=1559716&c=176060&highlight=&p=irol-newsArticle

ETA- they have a few job postings right now on Indeed for editors, marketing individuals and others
‹ Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


Recent discussions in the Kindle Book forum

 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Kindle Book forum
Participants:  29
Total posts:  155
Initial post:  Feb 17, 2013
Latest post:  May 18, 2014

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 2 customers

Search Customer Discussions