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Janeites at large in the Jane-iverse


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Showing 1-22 of 22 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jul 11, 2012 4:49:10 PM PDT
My historical mystery thread was so much fun yesterday, that I thought I'd start a new one.

To start with, I'm wondering how many of our literate lurkers and/or quick-witted regulars (besides me) are Jane Austen fans? Which book is your favorite and why? For me, it is, and always will, P&P. I'm not sure if this is actually because I picture Colin Firth as Fitzwilliam Darcy or if it's because it's the best. Whatever the reason is, I love P&P. My least favorite, OTOH, is Northanger Abbey. The faux Gothic thing just doesn't do it for me at all.

Moving on, though, let's talk about sequels, pastiche and other forms of Jane-worship. Have you read any good ones? Any really, really bad ones? Any that are so bad they are good?

Months ago, I bought this one for .99: Fitzwilliam Darcy, Rock Star. Still haven't read it. Plus, I have this one: Death Comes to Pemberley. I haven't read it either, although I love PD James.

So, come on Janeites. What say you?

Posted on Jul 11, 2012 5:25:11 PM PDT
If no one comes around soon, Mayhem, there's a guy in the fiction forum who wants to talk about Paul Theroux, but who may be open to alternative suggestions. Here's the link
http://www.amazon.com/forum/fiction/ref=cm_cd_tfp_ef_tft_tp?_encoding=UTF8&cdForum=Fx1X9OILUVOYVZ7&cdThread=TxKBQIMJN3Z8HZ

tootles

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 11, 2012 5:43:44 PM PDT
Huge Janeite! Pride and Prejudice is the best. I've seen all the adaptations and films, even Bollywood's Bride and Prejudice.

Northanger Abbey is actually my second favorite, then Sense and Sensibility. My least favorite is Emma.

I just finished listening to Death Comes to Pemberley. I won't give you any hints on what I thought since you haven't read it yet.

I've read these by Elizabeth Aston and like them a lot:

Darcy Connection
Exploits and Adventures of Miss Alethea Darcy
Mr. Darcy's Daughters
Second Mrs. Darcy
True Darcy Spirit

I liked Later Days at Highbury and Visit to Highbury by Joan Austen-Leigh (much better than Emma).

Carrie Bebris has a series that take off from each of Austen's books. The first is Pride and Prescience. Most have some paranormal aspects.

I keep checking through my list of books read and see if I have anything else.

Posted on Jul 11, 2012 5:48:57 PM PDT
cathyr says:
So disappointed this thread isn't about Fireflies :-(

(Not that I'd have anything to add, but I once knitted 20 Jane-hats for a con, and I love the fan refs in Castle).

----

Okay, my fav Austen would be Sense and Sensibility. I don't like the zombie versions. But I love any BBC adaptation.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 11, 2012 5:50:34 PM PDT
I have to admit, I have not read any Jane Austin. I find her and Georgette Heyer difficult to read. I gather that most native English speakers read various classics (of course in English as I did in German) and therefore are better equipped reading books by Jane Austin. I had a wonderful English teacher, she started in the 7th grade and we were fortunate that she stayed until the end of the 10th grade. She taught us English by listening to the Beatles and other pop music. Consequently, when I travelled a few years later and worked in England, I had no problem with slang or the various accents spoken.
I am afraid I can't contribute a lot to this thread.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 11, 2012 5:51:55 PM PDT
Have you ever tried listening to Pride and Prejudice? I find some books better in audio than print.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 11, 2012 6:04:10 PM PDT
Are you trying to get my TBR pile higher and higher? For now I am sticking with e-books and try to reduce my paperback pile (I have not bought a paperback in several months). Once that is down to about 50, I can look into adding another media for books.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 11, 2012 6:59:34 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 11, 2012 7:00:25 PM PDT
Miss M says:
" My least favorite is Emma."

Ohhh, stabbed me in the heart there! :)
I've always loved Emma because I can really relate to the stubbornness, thinking you know better....
So, I'm probably not a true Jane-ite, when I was younger I'd read both Emma and Sense and Sensibility almost every year, but haven't done that in at least ten years...

I did recently re-read 'Pride and Prejudice' because I wanted to read the PD James book. I have to say, for that one the critics were right. For me, it was just passable - of course the writing was fine, it is PD James after all. I thought the 'mystery' portion was only so-so, and was actually irritated when she force-fed info about the current legal system into the flow. But what really blew my top (bearing in my mind I've never really read any fan-fiction, Janeite or otherwise, before) was when she presumed to 'explain' some of the behavior/backstory of Elizabeth & Mr Darcy. I guess I can understand taking the characters and making them do what you want, but to actually go back into another writer's work and re-explain it, to me that's just going too far. But I may not really understand how that's supposed to work.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 11, 2012 7:03:10 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 12, 2012 9:02:13 AM PDT
Miss M says:
Hi Angela,

Did you ever read 'Der Trotzkopf' when you were a kid? That's a classic that made me think of 'Emma.'

Posted on Jul 11, 2012 7:12:11 PM PDT
Miss M says:
I know we're meant to be talking about Jane and follow-on works, but if anybody is interested in some other near-contemporaries they might enjoy as free classics on the kindle, I'd also recommend:

Fanny Burney - fascinating woman, if you saw the movie "The Madness of King George" she was one of Queen Charlotte's ladies-in-waiting whom the king liked to 'attack' - she married a French nobleman and followed him to exile in the US and back (as Madame d'Arblay) - she underwent an early mastectomy without anesthetic...
There are some interesting volumes of her letters & diaries out, but she was also one of the 'first' female novelists.

Evelina, Or, the History of a Young Lady's Entrance into the World - her first, is wonderful, especially if you like epistolary novels.

Also, Emily Eden's two novels are excellent:
THE SEMI-ATTACHED COUPLE

Her other, "The Semi-Detached House", is available free at mobileread:
http://www.mobileread.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20431

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 11, 2012 7:22:08 PM PDT
>>But what really blew my top (bearing in my mind I've never really read any fan-fiction, Janeite or otherwise, before) was when she presumed to 'explain' some of the behavior/backstory of Elizabeth & Mr Darcy. I guess I can understand taking the characters and making them do what you want, but to actually go back into another writer's work and re-explain it, to me that's just going too far. But I may not really understand how that's supposed to work.<<

You've hit on what irritated me, too. I think FanFic has to keep the characters essentially the same. If you're going to change the characters, then you're writing a whole different story.

The sequels I haven't liked were ones where Darcy and Elizabeth behaved in ways that it would have been impossible for them to do. The whole reason for reading these type of books is to get more of the characters we love. If they are behaving against their very natures that just destroys the book for me.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 11, 2012 9:51:13 PM PDT
Is that one of the "Nesthaeckchen" series? Anyhow, I read all of those as well as "Gisel and Ursel" about twin sister whose parents moved either from a small town in the country to Hamburg or the other way round. Another series I read was "Suzanne Barden", a story about a young woman becoming a nurse, finding her way through nursing school, ultimately marrying a resident doctor who moved to the country side where she then becomes I guess what today would be the community nurses.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 11, 2012 10:23:45 PM PDT
Miss M says:
Angela,
No, Trotzkopf is actually older (and available as a kindle classic :) - I discovered the Nesthaeckchen books when I was going through my mothers boxes, but haven't gone through them yet. I used to read a lot of translated Enid Blyton - particularly the Hanni & Nanni series. I will look out for Suzanne Barden.

Der Trotzkopf (German Edition) - (very dated, but fun to look at...)

Posted on Jul 12, 2012 1:02:19 AM PDT
Kribu says:
Sense and Sensibility is my favourite, followed by Emma and only then Pride and Prejudice.

I started reading Austen at, hmm, 17 or 18... it was definitely hard going at first, even though I'd read several books in English by that time. I've read all of her completed novels at least once, although I think I've only read Persuasion, Northanger Abbey and Mansfield Park once, a long time ago, so my memory of those is rather hazy.

Posted on Jul 12, 2012 7:39:02 AM PDT
I think P & P is probably my favorite.
I just recently read Northanger Abbey and had some conflicting feelings about it.
I've read that the novel is supposed to be a parody of the gothic books of the time. I was a bit aggravated at the fact that the protagonist is so dim that she sees gothic horrors all over the place. Because apparently a woman of that time couldn't read a gothic novel and NOT then see ghosts and evil plots and schemes everywhere.
On the other hand, I did laugh a few times while reading it and I did enjoy the story, but it didn't have the somewhat hidden scathing commentary on society like books by Edith Wharton. There was very little meat to the book, if that makes any sense.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 12, 2012 9:44:51 AM PDT
I read one by Fanny Burney - Cecilia: Or Memoirs of an Heiress ¿ Volume 1 - years ago. It was very enjoyable.

And, absolutely, expand the discussion to other classic works. I love a good, rambling book discussion.

Not really a contemporary, but has anyone read The Enchanted April? One of my favorite free classics.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 12, 2012 9:58:34 AM PDT
Strangely enough, Suzanne Barden books were by an American author but are only available used on Amazon in German. I will check out Der Trotzkopf (German Edition) and see if it jocks memories.

Posted on Jul 13, 2012 9:07:46 AM PDT
There's quite a comprehensive list of Austenesque novels listed by year of publication here:

http://janeaustenreviews.blogspot.co.uk/p/comprehensive-guide-to-austenesque.html

Posted on Jul 14, 2012 2:08:10 AM PDT
peachbird76 says:
Pride and Prejudice is my favourite story.
I loved Emma and Sense and Sensibility as well.

Posted on Jul 15, 2012 6:08:26 AM PDT
I've read all of Austen's works and they are among my all time favorites. I don't usually read any of the sequels but made an exception for Death Comes to Pemberley because it was written by PD James. I was extremely disappointed and didn't bother to even finish it, in fact I gave up about halfway through and skipped to the end just to find out who committed the crime. There is one series of Jane Austen mysteries written by Stephanie Barron that I highly recommend. Each book finds Jane herself involved in a mystery which she helps to unravel. They bring Jane to life as never before and are highly entertaining.

Posted on Jul 15, 2012 6:20:50 AM PDT
Karen Mead says:
I love Pride and Prejudice, but I'm not that big a Jane fan overall. Reading Persuasion for school when I was a teen was like banging my head against the wall, but then again it's possible I was just too young to appreciate it at the time.

Anyway, as much as I love P&P, I haven't read any of the fan sequels and continuations-- elevating fanfiction to novel status creates problems for me. Even if I loved one of the sequels, I would be telling myself "This isn't what really happened since it's not the original author's vision, it's just a story using the same characters," which would kill the fun of it for me. I guess I'm kind of a stickler for things being canonical, even though it's all fiction:).

I made an exception for Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, but meh...it was kind of dull actually. Elizabeth and Darcy's confrontations were actually a lot less interesting when they were doing fisticuffs.

Posted on Jul 12, 2013 6:02:27 PM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Jul 12, 2013 6:02:32 PM PDT]
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Discussion in:  Kindle Book forum
Participants:  13
Total posts:  22
Initial post:  Jul 11, 2012
Latest post:  Jul 12, 2013

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