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Reviews that make your skin crawl


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In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 2:53:31 PM PDT
G. says:
@Will: I didn't even notice that! You are right, and I think the evidence does lean towards the U.S. What a sick creature.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 2:54:58 PM PDT
G. says:
@meltingsnow: You have MAD sleuthing abilities! Thanks for posting this.

Posted on Apr 22, 2012 3:15:43 PM PDT
I've passed that link (without looking at it - I've NO desire to have such images on my computer) to a friend of mine, who is a UK police officer specialising in domestic violence.

If there is anything that can be done on that front, I'm sure that it will happen.

Posted on Apr 22, 2012 3:17:00 PM PDT
Ryan says:
Don't underestimate how far the human mind will go to rationalize moral depravity.

What makes me angry is how sex with children is being promoted on television, sometimes subliminally, other times not so much. In most cases it is under the guise of comedy or deep drama. Take Family Guy and MTV's "Skins" for example. So really, it comes down to the moral fabric of society unraveling. It really all started with the "It's not my fault, I was born this way" argument.

I do believe we're all predisposed from birth, and early childhood to have certain vices or weaknesses, also known as sin. But just because I was born predisposed to have more of an inclination towards sexually abusing children (No, I'm not speaking personally), doesn't mean it's OK for me to follow that.

Knowing that I might like to drink more than the next guy, or that some twisted part of me likes to watch people suffer, doesn't make it OK for me to follow those drives, and knowing that I have those tendencies(again not speaking personally) I should keep myself from alcohol, and violent movies/video games/etc. It's common sense, or at least it used to be. If we all followed our lusts, we would wind turning into the monsters we fear the most.

I think it comes down to the classic argument: Are people born good, or are they born bad.

History tells us bad, through constant war, murder, betrayal, etc. I'm honest enough with myself to know that apart from God, there is nothing good in me.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 3:27:07 PM PDT
AmeliaAT says:
Totally -- I wouldn't want this person within miles of any children. And if he's talking like this, and doing those photographs, I'm sure he's acted on it.

It really is enough to make me vomit.

Posted on Apr 22, 2012 3:27:36 PM PDT
Ryan, none of us are perfect. I for example, tell bad jokes and i'm hopeless at looking after money.

But we can all appreciate that some things are just plain wrong. And those who suffer from those feelings have a responsibility to address the issues, not give in to them. We can all feel anger and rage, for example when some one pinches the parking spot we'd been watching. But most of us show enough self control not to go and beat the living daylights out of the malefactor.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 3:50:59 PM PDT
Ryan says:
Thanks Will, that's exactly what I'm saying. But in my honest opinion, the only two reasons most of us show enough self control not to cave into our weaknesses are God(conscience), and fear. Fear of repercussions, fear of how we would look at ourselves, and fear of what others would think. In this sense, fear is good, as it keeps us more civil towards one another.

You notice this creep (not you Will, but the pedophile) basis his argument on the fact that children's bodies belong to themselves. That isn't true. Our job as parents is to teach our kids and to keep them safe, not to encourage self exploration into sexuality.

Would you put a lollipop, a cookie and a glass of anti freeze in front of your child to encourage them to make their own decisions and help develop their sense of confidence and choice? Absolutely not. But why is that? Do children own their own bodies? Yes and no. A child is a human, and has basic human rights, however, the parents job is to strengthen, teach, motivate and DISCIPLINE the child to teach them what WE as parents believe is good and acceptable.

But now, with humanism/post modernism/political correctness, we've turned discipline into a bad thing, and we're told that we're manipulating children. Damn right I'll manipulate my children! I'll manipulate them to be polite, kind, honest, caring, strong, determined, free thinking to the best of my ability until they turn 18.

If you take the bait mainstream media, culture and sociopolitical think tanks give us, you're in for a rough ride, and you can bet your two dollars that your children will suffer the consequences.

Also, on a separate note, did anyone look at that guys wishlist? CREEPY.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 3:54:05 PM PDT
G. says:
Thanks Will. This situation points to a lot of sickening things, and I hope this particular person isn't hopping through EU right now. And why the "parents" monicker? I highly doubt he is part of a family unit; or at least I hope not. Thanks for taking this a step further...really :).

Posted on Apr 22, 2012 4:27:19 PM PDT
I'm sure that we've all seen sickening newspaper reports of awful things happening. And then neighbours turn round and say, oh yes, he/she had been doing disturbing things and I was worried something might happen.

At least alerting the police to a possibility is better than doing nothing. The guy may not have committed a crime. He may just espouse views that the rest of us find repellent. But...I like sleeping at night.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 4:34:04 PM PDT
G. says:
The thing I am worried about? Is that he may be skipping through the EU as an "english" teacher, and is on some sort of contract teaching situation that allows him to be in mulitple countries. Sad, and very scary. Again, I am glad you notified the authorities.

Posted on Apr 22, 2012 6:26:31 PM PDT
Page243 says:
Eastern Europe, from what I've read, is one of the biggest sources of human trafficking, including minors. I imagine a pedophile could hide there nicely with enough money.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 10:58:14 PM PDT
technorebel says:
The guy is definitely creepy! He also has a blog called "Sex Hysteria" that's pretty much just one long rationalization for sexually abusing children, only he calls it "sex play between different age groups". It doesn't surprise me to stumble across such reviews since Amazon appears to sell a lot of pornography, euphemistically called "erotica".
But this guy seems to make it his mission to argue against any book that dares to suggest that children should be protected from predators.

Posted on Apr 22, 2012 11:39:06 PM PDT
His website indicates he is in Italy.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 1:12:18 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 23, 2012 1:12:35 AM PDT
Ciel 1101 says:
Oh dear god. He's in Italy?????
Over there, I think they allow minors to engage in "activity" with adults. That's downright wrong.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 2:54:08 AM PDT
"Over there, I think they allow minors to engage in "activity" with adults. That's downright wrong."

Let's not get too crazy. There's a substantial difference between an adult of 20 having consenting sex with a teenager of 17 (still a minor) and an adult preying on a pre-adolescent child who isn't mature enough to understand and consent. I'm not saying the former is a great idea and that such situations can't be abusive. But it's really not at all the same thing as the latter, which is always a pedophile abusing a child.

Posted on Apr 23, 2012 8:27:32 AM PDT
Alina says:
I'll tell you the story of one of the most stressed out students I ever saw in my teaching career. This student worked as the IT person in a small business. In the course of upgrading and fiddling around with things she discovered hard-core child pron (mispelled intentionally) on the computer of the one of the employees who was a personal friend of the boss. She drew it to the attention of the boss who said "I don't think we need to concern ourselves about this, it's not really our business". She contacted the police.

Because she was in such a unique position to access his computer the police asked her to act as an undercover agent and continue to monitor his computer activities and report to them. She said that the police had been extremely supportive of her during this time but she was under extreme stress due her dual role and the knowledge that she would lose her job as soon as the whole thing was uncovered and she would eventually have to testify. It was one of those sting operations that you hear about where multiple people are arrested in multiple countries.

So these things are taken seriously when you report them, people are monitored over time, the police are active with these people, even if we don't see it. Police are working in the background and it is worth reporting anyone of suspicion.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 10:34:07 AM PDT
Ms. P. says:
This is true. I had a friend who worked in the FBI on a unit dedicated to this stuff. A lot of the time they won't pull it down right away, they let people put out enough rope to really hang themselves so they can get convictions on everyone involved. It's always worth reporting, even if it looks like nothing happens.

Posted on Apr 23, 2012 3:34:36 PM PDT
meltingsnow says:
Thanks to everyone who is getting involved in stopping this scumbag. It's important, and I agree that reporting it is a good idea even when it seems like little is happening. Even though any one of us may be limited in our ability to make a difference, working together we can accomplish a lot.

Now, a brief "editorial" comment: There is a huge difference between preying on children or advocating the abuse of children, and writing or reading erotica for adults. There are many high quality and even literary works of fiction that include erotic elements that in no way promote the kind of criminal and immoral activity at issue here. I like a wide range of fiction, including some erotic fiction, and I think we need to be open-minded about the right of adults to say things we disagree with and read things we don't like. However, I draw the line at abuse of children, and in most countries, the law does as well.

Posted on Apr 23, 2012 4:06:14 PM PDT
JD (Author) says:
As someone who has written a memoir myself and also purchased books such as a courage to heal, I didnt actually get through his review. I think I was too disgusted to read it all.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 4:17:25 PM PDT
G. says:
Probably because you sensed the "predator" in this poster. I know that must sound dramatic, but I REALLY felt this while reading his posts excusing "different age group play". I truly doubt he is a "parent" as he purports on his website. What a sick, vile creature.

Posted on Apr 23, 2012 5:50:22 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Jul 1, 2012 9:36:15 AM PDT]

Posted on Apr 23, 2012 8:50:24 PM PDT
Page243 says:
C.C., anyone who says "what's more natural than children wanting to engage in sex play, especially with people she trusts" is really not open for debate in my opinion. I'm also pretty sure that it's pretty much universally understood, but to each his own.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 9:04:37 PM PDT
Dire Weevil says:
Ugh! I read it, and now I am left wondering why I did. I guess its to understand how people like this Adamo person thinks, but now that I have, all that I am left with is a sick feeling. There is a method of thought that we should all accept other ways of thinking, no matter what. Adamo proves this method foolish.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 23, 2012 9:20:35 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Jul 1, 2012 9:36:19 AM PDT]

Posted on Apr 23, 2012 9:33:10 PM PDT
Page243 says:
C.C., I understand fine lines. This isn't one of them. Despite the fact that he blames the "shame" of children regarding sex on hysterical, sexually dysfunctional mothers, he also advocates sex play between children and adults in several of his postings.

I do not have children, but I was one, and my parents were not hysterical nor did they ever "shame" me about my body. But I can tell you that when I was in sixth grade and a teacher(!) brushed his hand across my chest and remarked on my growing boobs, I did NOT feel playful or empowered. I did not want to "play". I felt sick and yes, ashamed. Shame is natural when a child knows something is wrong.

Yes, children of this generation are watched more carefully, but why? It's because men like Frank Adamo and worse are out there. They've always been there, but we're getting smarter now and more open...not less as he suggests.
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Discussion in:  Kindle Book forum
Participants:  21
Total posts:  59
Initial post:  Apr 20, 2012
Latest post:  Apr 27, 2012

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