Customer Discussions > Kindle Book forum

include a k-book with a hardcopy and i'll buy a kindle


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 551-575 of 830 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Mar 7, 2012 11:12:29 PM PST
Ian Lipsky says:
I admit i don't bother reading any license agreement, but wouldn't it depend upon which service you buy the mp3's from? In either case, I consider it OK for me to transfer an mp3 i bought to someone else as long as i dont retain a copy. Nothing is being stolen that way.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 8, 2012 2:19:53 AM PST
Theodoro says:
I bought a kindel 3 years ago, at that time was dificult to change the preasure to read and rite over hard copy pages and I gave to my mother fo 85 years old that enjoy very much and read at least two books a month.

I like to travel or go to some place I have to wait, prefere to be with a book. I had to travel with at least 3 books wich takes a lot of space.

Now I decide to bought another one for myself, my space for thousand of books is full (like to re read). My small kindle is a grate pleasure, better than read at computer, I take everywere, dozens of books.

My dificult is my advance in this new amazing world; make my mind accept the reading in kindle as paper books and makes my notes aceptable as in paper.

In price as I am in Brasil, it cost me less, at least 7 dolars per book and if I louse kindle I can dowload in a new kindle. I prefere to read in kindle (small one)than I Pad.

It is a new world, probably paper books is going same way as photos in paper and prices of e books probably will go down next years, we have to follow the waves, accept the changes and it is fun.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 8, 2012 5:09:12 AM PST
It took me about a year to grow comfortable reading in digital format. I've been a paperback lover for years and it's hard to teach an old dog new tricks. The ease of purchasing books electronically finally broke me down. I live about 45 minutes from the nearest bookstore, and waiting for mail order when you truly want to read something... well let's just say those factors significantly influenced my switch. I read almost all books now electronically and couldn't begin to imagine not having this service.

Posted on Mar 8, 2012 1:33:12 PM PST
Ian Lipsky says:
Just to highlight why drm/closed source ebook formats are bad - google books is having a sale to promote their rebranded market place. You can pick up a copy of Anthony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential for 25 cents. Unfortunately you can't read it on a kindle.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 8, 2012 1:37:08 PM PST
But since Amazon price matches other retailers...you can buy the Kindle version here for 25˘ Kitchen Confidential.

Posted on Mar 8, 2012 2:03:35 PM PST
Ian Lipsky says:
Ah cool - didnt know amazon would price match - do they do this for any online retailer or only the major ones? Still say a more open format is better though. Books should not be tied to devices specific to where you bought them. Technically google is also using drm, but it's just a little more flexible in what you can do with it and in device support.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 8, 2012 2:10:16 PM PST
On the other hand, is it really in the publishers' best interest to come down on Amazon over e-books when Amazon is such a huge vendor of their paper books?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 8, 2012 2:15:33 PM PST
Ian Lipsky says:
Wait - why would the publishers be coming down on amazon? Amazon's basically doing what the publishers want. If amazon could do as it liked, i'm guessing they'd do away with drm as they did with mp3's.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 8, 2012 3:25:58 PM PST
M. Gurgun says:
I completely agree.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 8, 2012 6:21:22 PM PST
@I. Lipsky:

>I admit i don't bother reading any license agreement, but wouldn't it depend upon which service you buy the mp3's from?

Not for music from the big record labels. You mentioned earlier that you bought music from Google. This is from the Google Play terms of service:

https://play.google.com/about/music-terms.html

"Sale, Distribution or Assignment to Third Parties. You may not sell, rent, lease, redistribute, broadcast, transmit, communicate, modify, sublicense or transfer or assign your rights to the Music Content to any third party without authorization, including with regard to any downloads of Music Content that you may obtain through the Music Services."

Whether or not you knew what you were doing, you agreed to this when you purchased the music from Google.

>In either case, I consider it OK for me to transfer an mp3 i bought to someone else as long as i dont retain a copy. Nothing is being stolen that way.

So you think it's OK to promise not to do something, and then to do it anyway?

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 8, 2012 8:00:41 PM PST
Ian Lipsky says:
When it comes to that clause in the their terms, yes, i would not have a problem personally giving music i bought to someone else. Frankly, i don't care if they put that clause in the terms. As long as I am not making copies, or reselling or profiting in some other way, i don't think there's anything wrong in giving something i bought to someone else. My opinion is i OWN that single copy and I can do whatever i want with that single copy as long as it's not duplicated. I think it's beyond silly that i couldn't say buy an MP3 player for someone and buy a few albums and pre-load it.

In reply to an earlier post on May 6, 2012 4:27:11 AM PDT
Benitorro says:
I agree plus there is another reason for having both copies.
If the hard copy is a large book (more than 300 pages) the kindle is much more convenient to carry around and read but I still like to have the hard copy to leaf through the book and see where I am going and how far I have gone. You can sort of do this with a kindle but it's nowhere the same. Also graphics are always better in the hard copy version.

Posted on May 6, 2012 5:03:47 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Aug 8, 2012 7:31:56 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 13, 2013 2:22:24 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 13, 2013 2:30:16 PM PST
I like to have the real thing, and that's why I buy only Hardcovers. I'll take the book with me, when I'm out and I'll also take the book with me, when I'm on holidays. But still, I'd like to be able to read the next book I want, without having to take my whole library with me. So, in that case, having a 1$ (for example) copy of the kindle version of the Hardcover I just bought, would save me a lot of trouble, since I would read it in my tablet (I'm don't own a Kindle).
The main problem is that Kindle is also a type of media, and if Amazon would give me the kindle version for 1$ with each hardcopy purchase, I could (theoretically) sell the hardcopy to someone else and keep a copy for myself, almost for free. So, in this case, the publisher, and most importantly the writer, would have lost the profit a copy would give. I don't feel sorry for some of them, but I'm just saying they wouldn't do it.
"But the cost of the kindle copy is almost 0, since it's a copy", someone may say. I tried to think if this is true or not. And here are my thoughts:
Price of the kindle=
Amazon profit (per book)
Publisher's profit (per book)
Writer profit (per book)
Creating the kindle version cost (once)
Wireless shipping cost (for 3G "Kindles" which Amazon must pay something to the 3G provider I guess).

So the real cost is the writer's % (which I hope is more than 1$ per book) and the wireless shipping (+ creating the kindle version, but that's just once for each book). All the rest, is profit for Amazon and the Publisher.
However, I don't think Amazon and the publisher are willing to gift the possible profit from the kindle version, to each person who purchases a hardcopy. Because, as I said before, it's possible that, one will buy, two will read (and at the same time, not one after the other, which would be a different thing). So if two want to read, Amazon would rather sell twice.

I'm afraid we won't see it happen after all. Some discount when you purchase both formats, is the best I can expect...

Posted on Jan 13, 2013 4:05:21 PM PST
G. Weiss says:
Yet note: Amazon has just given a ripped copy of every CD ever purchased through them to the purchaser and gooing forward will do the same. That's exactly what I am talking about for books.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 13, 2013 6:07:01 PM PST
@G. Weiss:

No, it's not exactly what you're talking about for books.

First of all, it's not "every CD ever purchased through them"; it's only selected CDs. At this moment, there seem to be 37,282 Autorip selected CDs.

But it's not really the same thing as with books. As the name suggests, with Autorip you can get the same MP3 files that you would have gotten had you "ripped" the CDs yourself. There is no comparable way to "rip" paper books into electronic books.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 13, 2013 6:41:57 PM PST
G. Weiss says:
I think you are incorrect. Books are typeset digitally now, not with lead type. And if I buy a Kindle (or non Kindle e-book), yes, anyone in my family can read at the same time. If I buy the hard copy, I can read it and sell it/pass it on/loan it to 50 people. It's not as different as you think. I buy Baen books, they are non- DRMed, and I don't give them away while keeping them. Because I want Baen to stay in business. And if I were a pirate (as so many are), I would pull the DRM and throw it on the torrents. The people damaged by this policy aren't the crooks, or those who want writers to make money so they can keep writing.

Posted on Jan 13, 2013 7:46:15 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 13, 2013 7:47:02 PM PST
Scamp says:
I would suggest you write to Amazon with your suggestions. This is all wrapped up in DRM and other complications. Nothing to be solved here.

Oh, and this is an old thread. Nothing has been solved on this matter since May 2009, back when this old thread was started. Nothing will be solved until... well, the whole DRM thing is just a memory. Frankly, I hope some form of DRM is here to stay. There are too many self-entitled people who want something for nothing.

Quality is not free.

EDITED for clarity

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 13, 2013 8:30:25 PM PST
G. Weiss says:
I've done that, of course. And I have posted on this thread for years. And I have discussed it on my blog. And authors I buy have instituted non-DRM policies, as has TOR. And I preferentially buy from Baen, who if they don't bundle an e-copy, charge very little for older e-copies so I can at least buy up a second copy. I also believe at least one UK SF line has said they will bundle an e-copy. It's an evolving market, and this is just one thread of 1000s.
If you like DRM, I assume you crack it. Because I can't believe anyone wants to be tied to a single, proprietary, platform. I don't want to crack DRM. I want my life to be transparent and my tech as well.
You said this was about writer's earnings. Now you say it is about entitlement. I say it's about owning rather than renting.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 13, 2013 8:41:37 PM PST
Scamp says:
I acknowledge that owning what you buy is an issue, and not an insignificant one.

>>If you like DRM, I assume you crack it.<<

Never. Sorry, but I don't. I also don't lift stuff from the local Walgreens, whether anyone is looking or not.

>>You said this was about writer's earnings.<<

When did I say that? Link, please. I certainly did not even allude to that in my most recent post.

Posted on Jan 13, 2013 8:49:52 PM PST
G. Weiss says:
Sorry- conflated you with Belikas above, who I had been responding to.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 13, 2013 8:56:32 PM PST
Scamp says:
S'okay. I've done that before. :)

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 13, 2013 9:14:00 PM PST
Books are typeset digitally now, and the same file that is converted to an ebook format also serves as input to the printing process.

However, I don't get that electronic copy when I purchase a hard copy. If I want both (as I sometimes do for some kinds of nonfiction books) I'll pay money for both.

When I buy a music CD, I can rip the CD into my music library. With Amazon's new policy, all that would happen is that I would get that ripped copy immediately instead of waiting a few days.

There's nothing comparable to that with paper books. I could destroy the book, feed its pages into a sheet-fed scanner and have a scanned copy, which I can convert to a text file through OCR. Then I'd have to manipulate the book to get it into a readable e-format. If an ebook copy is available, it would be easier for me to buy it.

I don't let the DRM status of a book decide for me whether I buy it or not. I choose based on the contents of the book.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 13, 2013 11:47:58 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Jan 13, 2013 11:50:58 PM PST]

Posted on Jan 14, 2013 6:06:43 AM PST
G. Weiss says:
I let several things determine whether I buy an e-book and DRM is one of them, as my spouse uses an Ipad and I use a Kindle. Price is also a huge issue- I will not pay more for an e-book than I will for a physical book, unless I love the book so much I am not willing to wait a few days to get it, which knocks out all those books whose physical prices have decreased while the e-price remains the same (and higher). I buy several 100 books a year (and take a few out of the library) so I think I am an audience/market that is highly desired.
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


Recent discussions in the Kindle Book forum


Active discussions in related forums  
   
 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Kindle Book forum
Participants:  194
Total posts:  830
Initial post:  May 8, 2009
Latest post:  Oct 12, 2013

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 13 customers

Search Customer Discussions