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What is the most common complaint you have about indie books?


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Posted on Apr 20, 2012 6:06:20 AM PDT
Splinker says:
I do agree that it is extremely difficult to do a good job proofreading your own work. Even if you get the dotted i's and crossed t's, there's the over repetition of names, adverbs, awkward language, etc. I proof every 1,000 words at least twenty times, usually thirty or more. I also submit my chapters to a critique site where at least three people review and offer comments and point out errors. Then I submit it to at least two editors. Then I publish it. Then I find errors. Then I order Chinese.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 20, 2012 6:19:52 AM PDT
Ah, yes. But when you get to order the Chinese, you have to give them numbers because you can't read and pronounce the menu.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 20, 2012 6:21:14 AM PDT
I have noticed that with the advent of internet porn the eyesight of the older generation has deteriorated sharply.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 20, 2012 6:33:24 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 20, 2012 6:36:04 AM PDT
Alina says:
Maybe you should launch yourself on: http://www.kickstarter.com/ asking for pledges of Chinese.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 20, 2012 11:08:40 AM PDT
P. S. Wright says:
Hee-hee BevHarro. You can't take it back. That's the way the threads work. I wasn't addressing my second post specifically to you but in response to another response. That's just conversational overspill. Relax. I thought it was a good subject to discuss here. Bringing up good subjects is great. Please join me on all the threads I regularly visit. We need more real conversation.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 20, 2012 11:11:11 AM PDT
P. S. Wright says:
ABNA is a start. They are moving toward their semi-finals now. The finals are a vote by Amazon readers.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 20, 2012 11:15:35 AM PDT
Emerald says:
<<Try reading a book (whether being paid to read it or not) and not either enjoy it or otherwise? >>

Oh boy. The answer is you are being paid to find errors, not enjoy the book. I guess it depends on your definition of proofing. And professionalism.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 20, 2012 12:19:03 PM PDT
Miss M says:
BevHarro,
I agree with PS Wright - you kicked off an interesting discussion, so thanks for that.
As I remember your original post (too lazy to search) you asked an open-ended question which is getting some good feedback from a number of perspectives. That's a good thing! ;)

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 20, 2012 12:35:18 PM PDT
Rick G says:
Why can't one do both? I have been known, on occasion, to enjoy my job. I'm sure a few other people can make such a claim. Some people can't separate enjoyment from work (i.e. telecommuting comes to mind, some people simply cannot work from home), but many can and still do a fine job. If Bev's clients are happy with her work / she's putting out solid proofs then what does it matter? I say more power to her if she's doing a good job, making a few $, and doing it with a smile on her face.

Posted on Apr 20, 2012 6:57:57 PM PDT
Kelli says:
My biggest complaint about indies is their love of details (after shill reviews). It is sort of like listening to your child or mom explain their bowel movements. I keep thinking 'just flush' and it will go away. But no, they invariably write their story as a trilogy to draw out your pain.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 21, 2012 1:17:55 AM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Apr 22, 2012 4:53:36 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 21, 2012 12:07:14 PM PDT
I do an occasional outside edit, maybe six or eight full-length books a year. I won't take one on if I think I can't help the author. You get books like that sometimes. You know...they are hopeless in their present form and no amount of pro editing is going to make them suitable. Most of the books I've edited, I enjoyed doing it because there is satisfaction in making something better than it once was.

If you're an editor and you take on books that you know will still be garbage even after you do 'your thing,' then you will never enjoy your work. It's a bit like restoring classic cars for a hobby. Pick the right ones and you have fun. Pick the wrong ones and it's simply drudgery...plus you feel a sense of guilt taking money for editing a book that you know is going nowhere anyway.

Robert M Blevins

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 21, 2012 5:28:59 PM PDT
Like....Hunger Games?

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 21, 2012 5:32:37 PM PDT
G. says:
@Nick: The Hunger Games Trilogy was quite well done. Shame on the author for writing books that appeal to tweens/teens/adults, and translates into a best-selling movie! Another author who is laughing all the way to the bank (and deserves to do so!).

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 21, 2012 5:35:14 PM PDT
Yes...that was my point.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 21, 2012 6:02:14 PM PDT
G. says:
I missed the sarcasm? It wouldn't be the first time...sometimes I miss the obvious. For shame ;).

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 21, 2012 6:39:45 PM PDT
Miss M says:
G,
Case you hadn't noticed, number of threads were moved to MOA - incl Joeschmoe...

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 21, 2012 8:33:01 PM PDT
P. S. Wright says:
I have no idea if it will effect your business. You sound like you're more pro than I am by a mile and certainly don't need any help from us. But it is conversation. You might try just answering though, rather than laughing at folks. Tends not to get a very positive response. Just sayin.

Posted on Apr 22, 2012 5:01:32 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 22, 2012 5:04:00 AM PDT
BevHarro says:
<<Oh boy. The answer is you are being paid to find errors, not enjoy the book. I guess it depends on your definition of proofing. And professionalism.>>

Referring to the above post, I have just deleted my reply - I do not want anyone to have a bad opinion of me or my business. And I apologise Emerald.
P.S. Wright- I was not actually laughing at people, just the post making it sound like I was unprofessional for enjoying my work. Goodness, if you cannot enjoy what you are doing, what is the point of it all?
All I can really say is to have a look at my website and my author recommendations and I guess they speak for themselves.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 6:00:39 AM PDT
G. says:
Thanks for the heads-up Mitford. I hadn't noticed? Not surprising though, it has been a busy weekend.

Posted on Apr 22, 2012 8:41:38 AM PDT
Splinker says:
We now have more complaints than there are indie books.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 10:37:07 AM PDT
Question: "What is the difference between an Indie publisher and a 'mainstream' publisher?"

Answer: Look for three basic things.

1) Often the Indie publisher will not release their books at prices that reflect similar prices for the same type/size of book. You can tell this by looking at their Amazon price offerings, i.e. are the books offered up much cheaper than the list price by Amazon book vendors. Indies often will not release at the standard trade rate of 55% off the cover price, and therefore are less often listed by the vendors. When you see a book at Amazon that Amazon has listed at $11.99, and there are no vendor offers at seven to eight dollars, the publisher is most likely an Indie.

2) Sometimes the Indie does not have their own ISBN prefix because they are purchasing ISBN's individually, rather than in groups of ten or more.

3) Cheap cover art and typos in the manuscript, and obviously poor editing in general. Some Indies are better at this than others, though...and that is what makes a GOOD Indie.

Robert M Blevins
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In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 10:41:57 AM PDT
Splinker says:
Plus, our dedication pages are usually longer, and we don't bother writing endings, as 9 out of 10 readers don't get that far.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 10:55:28 AM PDT
Rick G says:
No offense, Robert, but I don't find these the most useful of tips.

1 & 2 I would argue are essentially meaningless to 99% of purchasers. Also 1 isn't entirely true. I've seen instances of POD books from Createspace being discounted by vendors.

3, well I think people are aware of that. Although, if you look in the sister thread of this one (most common complaints about traditionally pubbed books), you'll see that indies don't have a lock on this, especially with poor OCR scans of older titles.

I would say the best way to tell if a book is Indie:

1) Price. You're not going to see too many new $2.99 eBooks from the big six.
2) look at the publisher listing. If it says Amazon or lists a Press you've never heard of, then it's probably either Indie or a small press house.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012 10:57:58 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 22, 2012 10:58:17 AM PDT
Rick G says:
Fair enough, Bev. I'll take a look. At the very least I am of the mindset that an indie author can't have enough links to either cover artists or proofers. It should be part of our basic arsenal. :)
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Discussion in:  Kindle Book forum
Participants:  159
Total posts:  1177
Initial post:  Apr 3, 2012
Latest post:  Jun 13, 2012

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