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Buy a Physical book, get the digital copy for a lower price.


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In reply to an earlier post on Jun 10, 2012 10:40:37 AM PDT
I buy CDs of popular music. I have never seen this.

Posted on Jun 11, 2012 1:43:17 AM PDT
Ben Vale says:
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Posted on Jun 11, 2012 5:56:35 AM PDT
While they're at it, could they replace all my vhs tapes and dvds and Blu Rays with digital? I mean, I already bought a computer and player which will allow me to stream. And I'd like all my cds and cassette tapes converted to MP3 for free. It would cost me a fortune if I had to buy them all over again.

Oh yeah, I have horses, too. Amazon, give me that car so that I can travel in a way that is more convenient for me. OK, I'll pay a nominal fee to have you convert my horse to the car of my choice. But really...what are you waiting for?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 6:11:46 AM PDT
Perry says:
"could they replace all my vhs tapes and dvds and Blu Rays with digital"

Yeah, it is too bad the movie industry hasn't thought to bundle blu-ray, dvd, and digital copy into one affordable package, say just $5 more than the blu-ray only. Wait, what? They've been doing this for years?!

And I can explain how to create mp3s from your CDs if you would like, it's pretty straight-forward and completely legal, takes just a few minutes per CD.

Can't help you about your horses though.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 6:39:12 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 11, 2012 6:40:33 AM PDT
I understand that it sometimes happens. But I want all my old stuff digitized, Perry, just as Ben wants all his paper library digitized for a nominal fee. See the difference, Perry? Probably not.

Yes, I know how to convert CDs to mp3's, Perry. I also know how to convert my vinyls to digital. Ben could digitize his library for free, also, but he wants somebody else to do it for him. See the difference, Perry? Probably not.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 6:44:43 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 11, 2012 6:49:51 AM PDT
Perry says:
You did not use the reply function. I had no idea who you were responding to. I was going with the concept of the thread.

ETA, okay, I read his posts a little closer. He wants bundles (as many in this thread are suggesting), and would also like an upgrade path for existing library. I think the first option is slightly possible if the publishers could see more sales from it, but the second is logistically difficult, maybe Amazon could do some sort of promotion were they can issue one time coupons for your account to apply to the same book in Kindle format to stimulate sales.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 6:46:58 AM PDT
Nice excuse for your missed comprehension of my post, Perry.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 6:50:39 AM PDT
Perry says:
I tend to skim over the long wordy posts in these threads. :P

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 7:46:11 AM PDT
Ben Vale says:
I think there's a slight difference between upgrading from vhs to dvd to blue-ray. All three are just inputs into your TV and will play even on older models (with some downgrading). A physical book can not be easily plugged into a kindle without having to scan in every page and convert it. Also the reading experience of a Kindle is not superior to a book, especially when the book contains a lot of images and complex layouts. It is therefore not really a replacement for an inferior product like it is with other electronic devices (or a car to replace the horse). It is just a great device to carry your books around when your on the go.

I mean think about it. If you bought a bag or backpack for carrying your books and you had to pay for each book you want to carry in the bag the full price again, wouldn't that be ridiculous? A book is just a container of words. When we buy books we don't pay for the paper it's printed on but for the content. Otherwise books should all cost only the price in paper and ink.

It's intellectual property we're speaking about and once we paid for it, unless we sell it again, it's ours and there should be no need to have to pay for it twice. A small conversion/upgrade fee to another media like Apress and O'Reilly do is acceptable).

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 8:18:00 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 11, 2012 8:20:30 AM PDT
So if I purchase a book in any format, I should be able to get 100,000 copies for free, because it's only intellectual property? Fail.

My blu rays will not play on my vhs machine. And the reading experience is superior to a paper book IMO. Furthermore, when did we stop paying for the paper in paper books?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 8:26:10 AM PDT
Perry says:
I think your CD and mp3 analogy was better. The music industry never embraced mp3s at the beginning. They would not sell their music as mp3s. They intentional crippled their CDs to try to make ripping them more difficult. They spent all of their effort going after file sharing sites and made out everyone who listened to mp3s as criminals. It wasn't that long ago, and it was a dark time for the music industry. Arguably, we are all better off after the full transition to digital occurred with reasonable priced singles and albums. Ironically, vinyl sales are the highest growing part of the business now, for what that's worth.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 11:10:09 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 11, 2012 11:12:11 AM PDT
Ben Vale says:
If you argue this way, then what about when you loose your electronic copy of a book or it gets corrupted on your device. Should you have to buy a new electronic copy? With your reasoning, yes, because according to you it's about the media and not the intellectual property.

If you loose your print book, you have to buy another copy of that book. You won't get it for free unless you steal it. This does however not distract from the fact that what you're really buying is the intellectual content of the book, not the paper it's printed on. You will be able to buy the book second hand for a lot less money and not be forced to buy a new one (something I have an issue with, because the author does not benefit from second hand sales exactly on the argument - once you bought their book, it's yours, including the content, and the author or publisher has no longer any right over it even though the intellectual content is now passed on for free to a third party).

Like everything in life, books depreciate in value and there is no reason why you should have to pay the full amount of money to replace an old product. Electronic books are currently not sold second-hand on Amazon. According to your argument, if electronic books are just another media, we should all be able to resell our electronic versions on E-Bay and Amazon. Have you seen a second hand electronic book on Amazon yet?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 11:58:18 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 11, 2012 12:20:29 PM PDT
I cannot "loose" an electronic copy because all my ebooks are backed up on the Amazon cloud and on a hard drive. I dont have to buy a new electronic copy; I merely download the originally purchased digital copy.

My car depreciates in value. Should I not have to pay to replace it should it be lost? Do you believe that I should get a discount for a new one because I owned one previously? My ebooks never depreciate in value. My paper books do depreciate because of wear and tear.

Your logic is full of holes. You don't want to buy used paper books because the author doesn't get paid, but you have no qualms about getting a second (digital) copy of a book for a nominal fee. How are you suggesting that the author get paid for your digital copy?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 12:07:00 PM PDT
King Al says:
Actually, the major publishers hate Amazon, so if Amazon tried to make it happen, they would likely say "HELL No!"

Posted on Jun 11, 2012 2:50:42 PM PDT
Rhee Baldwin says:
Sometimes for a reference or larger book I'll get the hard copy from the library and purchase the ebook.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 4:07:44 PM PDT
Ben Vale says:
Well, you are confirming my argument. Print books are not backed up on the Amazon cloud for one simple reason: they cannot be easily copied like electronic books. This just proves my point.

If it would cost Amazon or any of the publishers to replace your book they wouldn't do it. Once an electronic version has been made it sits on a download server and can be copied a million times without ado. So ... if they can give it away for free once you bought an electronic copy, why having to pay for it when you already own the print book?

A print book is more expensive usually than an electronic version. I already paid extra for the printers and ink

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 4:19:41 PM PDT
Do you believe that if 400,000 electronic copies of a single book are sold that there are 400,000 electronic copies on the Amazon cloud?

I now realize the fallacy of discussing anything with you. Have a lovely life. I truly hope you get everything you wish for.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 4:30:13 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 11, 2012 5:37:55 PM PDT
Ben Vale says:
I think Amazon also gives them a lot of business, so I don't think they can hate Amazon that much.

Amazon can make things happen if it wants to. In the long run for Amazon to survive I believe it can only do so at the goodwill of writers and readers. When opportunity strikes people jump ship quickly if no loyalties are felt and the relationship was just 'pure business'.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 4:31:35 PM PDT
Ben Vale says:
Did I say that?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 4:34:54 PM PDT
Because the legal rights are completely different, and Amazon would have to pay the publisher/author for both the print book and the ebook if it "gave away" an ebook with a print book sale.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 4:36:18 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 11, 2012 4:37:46 PM PDT
Quote: Print books are not backed up on the Amazon cloud for one simple reason: they cannot be easily copied like electronic books.

Uh, print books are not backed up on the Amazon cloud because paper cannot be stored on a "cloud." If you believe that a paper book can be stored on a cloud, then I will not waste my time trying to figure out what is going on in your "cloud" for brains.

Once again, have a nice life.

ETA: I feel as though I've been punk'd. Is this guy for real?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2012 5:31:05 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 11, 2012 5:32:22 PM PDT
Ben Vale says:
Hey man, stay cool. Do I have to break down the sentence to make it easier for you to understand it? What I said is, as you quoted correctly, that they cannot be easily copied. It would require scanning in each page and OCR them.

On the other hand, though, print books don't begin their life as such. They start out as electronic versions and unless one uses old-fashioned type-setting, are passed straight to the printers once the publishers are happy with the format.

So here you have it. Even paper and hardback books do exist in electronic form. Paper is just another media like the Kindle to which it gets copied. I don't see any reason why owning a book in electronic format gives you rights to the original electronic content but a print book not. Aren't both drawing from the same source?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 12, 2012 10:38:26 AM PDT
This is true but many Dvds and blue rays now come with a digital download copy I believe books should do the same. And those versions cannot be returned if opened like Dvds and blue rays!

Posted on Jun 16, 2012 1:03:12 AM PDT
Danh says:
i don't care about the arguments i just want both copies! I'm eight so what. and I got a paper book fetish. i got money! give me what i want. "buy a physical copy and get the kindle version free!" whoever said that, props. give us what we want!

Posted on Jun 20, 2012 7:20:00 PM PDT
D. Rorabaugh says:
I'm surprised this hasn't happened yet. I love the convenience of the kindle but I also really love having the book on my shelf! I'd pay an extra fee to have both easily. Come on Amazon! Give the people what they want!
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Discussion in:  Kindle Book forum
Participants:  174
Total posts:  624
Initial post:  May 6, 2011
Latest post:  Aug 11, 2014

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