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Boycott anything over $9.99

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In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2010 7:12:32 AM PST
@ESBC,

I promise, the very moment you offer good advice or say anything relevant I will consider it. Until now all I read is drivel. Because you need it soooooo badly, you can have the last word. I am bored now and I do not expect anything of importance or revenant coming forth, I will let you get in the last word as you need this much more than I do.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2010 7:12:33 AM PST
J. V. Thomas says:
D. L. Trammell says: "@EBSC, I seem to do quite well."

At what?

Posted on Feb 1, 2010 7:13:07 AM PST
Private says:
I am sure the buggy whip companies would have loved to continue operating under old established business models, too. But alas, in the face of new technology it was not possible. Neither will it prove possible for McMillan and other publishers to continue to operate under antiquated marketing and pricing models in view of the new technology. No matter how desirable it may seem--it will not happen. I think Amazon has it about right with their new pricing and profit structure. Very few are going to pay hard back prices for the USE of a DRM'd digital file. They will pirate the file first, which is precisely what I predict will happen.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2010 7:15:43 AM PST
Sasha Zorman says:
Although I agree it is bad news for us, Amazon never stated "no book would be more tha 9.99".

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2010 7:15:45 AM PST
J. V. Thomas says:
Thanks, I'd prefer an example of what you do well at but it would only delay the inevitable. I guess your early capitulation will do.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2010 7:17:46 AM PST
@Donald C. Hauser,

You make a very good point that is reminiscent of the early days of music downloads. I feel that until the publisher start providing more bang for their buck, people will find a way around DRM and start to exchange files. No DRM is hack proof and until the publishers realize this, they are opening themselves up to content theft. As I mentioned earlier, I see the day when authors will sell direct to the consumer. This will render the actual device as just a means to an end. Right now Amazon has its readers by the throat based on the device, but what if that same title was available via PDF or Word or some other ubiquitous format? The device is rendered inconsequential.

Posted on Feb 1, 2010 7:18:15 AM PST
backreading says:
I will go back to the library if the pricing get's hiked up too much. What knuckleheads in a recession......

Posted on Feb 1, 2010 7:26:57 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 1, 2010 7:27:46 AM PST
J. V. Thomas says:
Authors may TRY to go directly to the consumer but it won't work. Even most of the best authors need an editor and most self-published novels are trash. If consumers have to wade through hundreds of self-published books to find one worth reading (particularly if they paid for all of them) it will ruin all self-published author's income - because few of us will do it.

We'll always have an intermediate of some sort. Publishing houses aren't going to go away any more than has the RIAA.

Posted on Feb 1, 2010 7:28:27 AM PST
S. Ackman says:
I believe that prices on e-books will eventually settle at the $9.99 price. After all the costs for the publisher is minimal when producing an eBook. ebooks are going to change the industry. More authors will make their writings available vie eBook where a printed book was not financially viable.

McMillian had better look to the future and come back the to $9.99. They are just trying to grab money now which will hurt them later.

Posted on Feb 1, 2010 7:39:58 AM PST
Akeyes says:
All, my first post here. As a recent Kindle owner, I have read more books in the last 3 weeks than I have read in a year. If the price of books goes up over $9.99, Ill wait to the paperback comes out or borrow from the library, too bad cause I love the conveniece of the Kindle. Greed by the publishers thats all!!! ANd soon they'll push a Lime WIre type file sharing technology jsut watch!

Posted on Feb 1, 2010 7:47:07 AM PST
CarolinaGirl says:
I totally agree! I will NEVER spend more that $9.99 for an ebook...NEVER!!!!

Posted on Feb 1, 2010 7:56:45 AM PST
M. Masseo says:
I'd like to boycott anything over 1.99. So I'm boycotting the 9.99+ price.
We all know how much is saved by using electronic books. (printing, distribution, etc.)

Posted on Feb 1, 2010 8:04:12 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 1, 2010 8:09:06 AM PST
I don't blame Amazon for this. I think they did what they had to do. I am going to try and avoid MacMillan books. MacMillan is really foolish. They don't realize that we Kindle readers do buy more books. I am reading more on the Kindle because a)I have more immediate choice and b) the price is reasonable enough for me to buy multiple books. In the long run, this could be MacMillan's loss. It can't cost them more to do ebook sales.

As for the Ipad. I loved the color for Newspapers but one major problem for me would be the page turn. Yes, it is flashy on the Ipad. It looks really cool. However, that flourish would get on my nerves, big time, when reading an entire book. When you turn a page in the Kindle, you are not aware of a page turning and that makes reading easier and faster. The Kindle is for readers and the Ipad may be for geek technology lovers.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2010 8:52:09 AM PST
C. Faull says:
Well said A. Sisk. I think what many of us are worried about is if too many people are willing to pay over the $9.99 price then that will set the price. I've owned my K1 since Mar. 2008 and we've been having this argument since then. Personally, I was willing for fork over the $399 for the K1 because the majority of books were being sold at $9.99 or less & I had just had sticker shock when I saw that most paperbacks had gone up to over $10.00 at the book store and I refuse to pay that much (and I chose the Kindle over the Sony because their e-book prices consistently ran lower than the Sony bookstore). So I think that most of us are worried that too many of the new Kindle owners are going to be willing to pay more and that's going to hurt the rest of us. However, such is life.

I think another argument here is the availability of ebooks from libraries and Amazons refusal to allow us to borrow DRM material from other sources (ie. our libraries). I love my Kindle but as I said, I paid $399 for it and now that books are available from the library I would like to use that outlet, but can't. Anyway, I supplemented my Kindle with a Sony Pocket-Reader so I can and I've decided that any book that is offered over $9.99 or that I will have to wait for, I will just get from my library on the Sony. My library system here is very good and I've noticed that most of the new releases are available in e-book format. It's a shame, like I said I love my Kindle but if Amazon won't make some changes and ebook prices continue to increase what point is there to remain with the Kindle when so many new options are available when it comes time for me to upgrade.

Posted on Feb 1, 2010 9:02:25 AM PST
"Authors may TRY to go directly to the consumer but it won't work. Even most of the best authors need an editor and most self-published novels are trash. If consumers have to wade through hundreds of self-published books to find one worth reading (particularly if they paid for all of them) it will ruin all self-published author's income - because few of us will do it."

That's not what has happened in the music industry. At all.

In the music industry, there has been an explosion of independent content, and a proliferation of microniche markets. There is more independent content than ever before and it's the fastest growing [maybe the only growing] segment of the market.

Posted on Feb 1, 2010 9:28:32 AM PST
Here's an interesting recap of the MacMillian/Amazon struggle: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/01/technology/companies/01amazonweb.html?th&emc=th
Let's remain strong in our fight BOYCOTT ANY BOOKS OVER $9.99

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2010 9:29:49 AM PST
yellowdog says:
I totally agree with you re the comparison with hardback books. I rarely have ever bought a hardback book....too expensive....I'll wait for the paperback version or if it's on the bargain table for less than a paperback, then I'll buy it. I comparison shop most of the time for books before I buy them on my kindle. We use to shop costco for paperback books and recently I checked on one (9.99 for the large paperback!) and found it for my kindle for 7.99! I bought it for my kindle. I won't be spending over $10 for a kindle book. If I've got to read it, I'll find it cheaper somewhere else, or borrow from the library...even if it means having to turn the pages again!

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2010 9:36:10 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 1, 2010 9:37:37 AM PST
Absolutely! That last paragraph says it all, Doris.

Joann

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2010 9:50:15 AM PST
Ann Wood says:
I agree. I will not purchase any books that are over the $10 price. We have got to stick together.

Posted on Feb 1, 2010 10:01:04 AM PST
Sauce says:
I could see myself paying more than $9.99 for an eBook...

If I get it the same day as the new release of the first edition hardcover.
If it truly looks like money was spent editing and formatting the text for the eBook format (quite often, it's not)
If publishers stop holding the release of eBooks regionally (e.g. one of my favorite authors published a book in the UK in January, but it doesn't come out in the US until APRIL. Suffice it to say, I ordered my copy from amazon.co.uk.)
If the price of the eBook is less than the price of the print book by a good margin (if 10% of the cost of a book is printing and distribution, then the discount should be at least 10%).

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2010 10:04:23 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 1, 2010 10:16:26 AM PST
J. V. Thomas says:
The post you've linked this response to wasn't comparing the proliferation of independent music with that of self-published authors. Independent music artists and self-published writers aren't a good comparison for at least three reasons:

1. It only takes 2 or 3 minutes to review a song,
2. one can be doing other things while reviewing a song, and
3. music artists can thrive without selling individual songs by going on tours.

I only mentioned the RIAA in an attempt to illustrate that, even despite the profusion of independent content, the music middleman (RIAA) hasn't gone away and Publishing Houses aren't going to either.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2010 10:08:19 AM PST
howboy says:
Bravo! My sentiments exactly. Without manufacturing costs, shipping costs and overhead....why exactly should ebooks be costing more and more? Macmillan is the Enron of publishing...

Posted on Feb 1, 2010 10:14:17 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 1, 2010 10:15:44 AM PST
@ Doris V.Baker, Thank you for the NYT site .
I thouroughly agree with J.Weinstein, Absolutely! That last paragraph says it all,Doris.

We absolutely have to have solidarity more than ever. Our wallet's will be doing the talking IMHO. There is no justification for the Publishers raising the price on any Digital ebook. We are all guinea pigs at this point. We have showed them in the past that we can and have justified why we will not spend over $9.99 for a ebook. and we will continue our cause. They are as bad as AIG etc.

Doris and Joann Thanks!!!!
Alice

Posted on Feb 1, 2010 10:21:27 AM PST
foolrex says:
If this decision gets expensive for Macmillan (and I mean boycotting EVERYTHING they publish, not just e-books), perhaps they will re-think their business model?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 1, 2010 10:29:42 AM PST
Sree Chavali says:
the publisher only saves 10% of cost by creating an e-book. the publisher still has to pay the author advance, for editing, for marketing & publicity. Very few print books actually create revenue for this reason.. Publisher are just hoping to break even with e-book sales, not be greedy by any means. Publishing is a struggling industry.
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Initial post:  Jan 2, 2009
Latest post:  Apr 14, 2010

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