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Will I be happy with a Kindle if I don't use the cloud much.


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Showing 1-12 of 12 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 28, 2012 7:54:58 PM PST
What I am asking is, I often cannot be connected to the Internet, so I want to understand if I can store all my content (space permitting) on my Kindle locally... or is Amazon constantly trying to shoe-horn people into the cloud (which I resist even when connected, due to both technical -metered Internet- as well as philosophical reasons).

> Most of my music is local (currently on iTunes in the AAC proprietary format, although I can convert it if Kindle does not play it natively)

> I am not an Amazon Prime member (although not opposed to signing up if reasons are compelling).

> I am a big buyer on Amazon. Love the pricing, service and convenience.

> When I stream content it's usually Netflix

> I intend to use the Kindle to play music, display photographs, store a few business documents (in PDF format if need be), and play slideshows set to music

thanx for any input!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 8:29:25 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 28, 2012 8:31:31 PM PST
Zanzibar says:
You read whatever you've downloaded to your kindle without having to be on the internet. You can keep hundreds of ebooks (more if you want the hassle of sorting through them) on your kindle, so you can read a long time without turning on wifi. I don't see anywhere that Amazon tries to make you read in the cloud. You don't use a kindle if you are using the cloud reader. I assume you aren't talking about an eink kindle though since you want to use it for photographs and music.

Posted on Nov 28, 2012 8:33:34 PM PST
Thanx Zanzibar. Good to know. I should have clarified I'm looking at the Kindle Fire HD.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 10:04:27 PM PST
R. D. Clark says:
Fire supports AAC if it's not DRM protected. You can copy music to the Fire from your iTunes Library via USB.

You don't need Prime to use a Fire. Although if you shop a lot here, you might want to look into it; the shipping benefits are the main attraction, and you get the streaming video and monthly book loan as a bonus.

There is a Netflix app for the Fire.

Look at the product page for the Fire HD for the media formats you can copy to and store on the Fire HD. You can copy from your computer via USB. I don't know what apps might be available for the Fire for authoring slideshows with music, but there must be some. If yours are already authored, make sure there's something for the Fire that can play them.

As for books, you can specify that your Kindle books be downloaded to your computer for transfer to the Fire. That way you have a local backup of all your books, although they will be encrypted specifically for the Fire. You can also download other copies for other devices and apps. But they will always remain available in the Cloud (aka "Kindle Archive") unless you specifically delete them there, in the online feature "Manage Your Kindle."

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 10:25:00 PM PST
Got it. I do have about 10% of my library as DRM, but I will research how to deal with that. In the past I believe I have burned such songs to a CD in CD format (not MP3 format), then ripped the CD as MP3. Gotta love Apple.

My slideshows are already composed and can be store on MP4 format. So looking good there I think.

So, I can see that I can indeed have a functioning tablet w/o being tethered to the Internet, and I appreciate that Amazon has made that easy.

Here is a question completely in a different direction. I almost bought a Nexus 7, but backed off due to QC issues and poor support from ASUS. However, I did fall in love with two features not available [theoretically] on Kindle.

1) GPS navigation. Ok, the solution to this simply seems to be an external GPS app that runs on Android, with a sensor that plugs into the USB port. I am researching that now, but if anyone reading this post has made it work (GPS + turn by turn navigation) I would love a shout out.

2) Google Now. Wow. Awesome technology. From what I have gathered so far Google Now can be hacked to run on Ice Cream sandwich. But I'm wondering if the procedure will work on Kindle Fire HD's version of ICS???

If I can make these two apps work on a Kindle Fire HD it's a good bet I will make the purchase. (!!)

thanx
jim

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 10:48:10 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 28, 2012 10:48:40 PM PST
R. D. Clark says:
Only the $499 8.9" Fire has GPS. The USB ports on the entire Kindle line do not support host mode, so you can't plug in a GPS device. Whether there's a Blutooth solution is something you'd have to investigate.

Google Now, no clue.

Posted on Nov 28, 2012 11:43:54 PM PST
Thanx RD. Did not know any of the Kindle line had GPS!

I did find an app called TetherGPS that will allow a GPS enabled phone to pass GPS data to a Kindle. Looks a bit cumbersome.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 29, 2012 5:02:01 AM PST
R. D. Clark says:
I suppose if you were using your smartphone as a wifi hotspot, using TetherGPS would be a simple addition. Make sure your phone's battery is fully charged, though!

Posted on Nov 29, 2012 5:34:08 AM PST
I'm not sure why you're concerned about QC with the Nexus 7. Asus and Google are excellent companies. Both stand behind the product and as far as I know there have been very few reported problems, other than the usual whiners.

Although I love the e-ink Kindles and use them exclusively for reading ebooks, I didn't much care for the original Fire and replaced mine with a Nexus 7 as soon as they came available. I've been completely satisfied with my N7 and with Google Play technical support.

I love the latest stock version of Android Jelly Bean on the N7. For my use, the Fire just doesn't compare. Google Now is fantastic. Voice search also works great and I use the GPS regularly.

There are a couple of other features important to me which are missing on the Fire: (1) VPN connections are supported and work perfectly. (2) With the Stickmount app and a USB-OTG cable, the N7 also allows use of usb memory sticks for external storage.

As to your question about off-line/non-cloud use, I never use Amazon's cloud for anything because I hate the way it's organized and the limited ability to sort and retrieve files the way I want.

I download everything and store it myself. On my PC, I use Calibre to organize and maintain my ebook library, Media Monkey for my music collection and VLC media player for my videos. Locally, I have a 2TB netork storage device so storage capacity is a non-issue for me. I also use Dropbox to store my ebooks and other files I may need to access over the internet when I'm away from home. My car stereo plays memory sticks so I also store a lot of music on them, which I can also play on my N7 with the Stickmount app.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 29, 2012 7:34:39 AM PST
MommaCat says:
I don't see that anyone mentioned your use of Netflix. You must stream Netflix. If you're using the app on your Fire that means using using an internet connection.

If there are updates to your books, that means using your internet connection.

They don't care if you use the cloud. That's your option.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 29, 2012 11:18:48 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 29, 2012 11:20:39 AM PST
@James R. Scarborough: Thanks for your comment. If you read the Amazon reviews for the Nexus 7 you will see what I mean (or read my recent review there). There is a pretty good sized fiasco going on with the glass that adheres to the display slipping and breaking. Many many complaints. And Asus does not appear to be taking the situation seriously at all. That's my read anyway.

BTW - After considering the Fire HD very closely I have decided not to purchase it. It is just toooo restictive. I was thinking that I could add GPS via the USB port. That is not doable however. I also fell in love with several Android features such as what you mention. And Google Now is very very attractive. I read that Google Now can be added to Ice Cream sandwich, but not sure if I could pull off adding it to Kindle's implemenation of ICS.

The fact that kindles don't support host mode on the USB port concerns me. It's one thing to make a tablet for consumption of Amazon services. But is there any harm in letting the tablet do other things that are not in competition for those services? Why not a fully functioning USB port? It's a strange decison in my book, because Amazon is so smart about their business. They are one of the few companies around that is long-sited enough to realize that spending the money on a world class customer service center now will ensure sales down the road. That is vision! Yet they [seemingly] needlessly cripple these tablets. I would have bought one except for this. But I will not carry two tablets; one for all things Amazpn and one for everything else. ;>

cheers

Posted on Nov 29, 2012 10:38:49 PM PST
You could try a bluetooth GPS receiver. Amazon has this one, although it seems like kind of an expensive add-on for a Fire.

Dual Electronics XGPS150A Universal Bluetooth GPS Receiver for Portable Devices
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Discussion in:  Kindle forum
Participants:  6
Total posts:  12
Initial post:  Nov 28, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 29, 2012

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