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Why do ebooks cost so much?


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Showing 1-25 of 307 posts in this discussion
Initial post: May 24, 2012 10:31:40 AM PDT
Debbie G says:
Why do ebooks cost so much? There is no paper, ink, binding, shipping or distribution cost associated with an ebook... I'm disappointed.

Posted on May 24, 2012 10:33:28 AM PDT
T. Cook says:
Because the publishers price them that way.
That's why the Government is suing them.

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 10:34:03 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 24, 2012 10:34:29 AM PDT
Look over ----------> there, underneath Your Recently Viewed Discussions, and search that question.

THOUSANDS of answers to your question. Thousands.

ETA: UN-click the "search only this discussion" box.

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 10:34:17 AM PDT
❤ Ann says:
Oh, good grief.

See the search box on the right? Try using it. There are at least a gazillion other ebook pricing threads. Go read a few of them and attempt to educate yourself a bit.

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 10:35:16 AM PDT
Why are the author's WORDS worth any less just because of what you carry them in?!?

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 10:36:20 AM PDT
Then don't buy any eBooks if they cost more than you are willing to spend.

Not quite sure why you felt the need to tell me that you are disappointed - thought that was a bit weird.

Posted on May 24, 2012 10:37:05 AM PDT
Just Peachy says:
<goes to fix more popcorn>

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 10:41:23 AM PDT
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In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 10:43:06 AM PDT
Oh god... you just killed another kitten. Why do you hate kittens?

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 10:48:05 AM PDT
Denis Powell says:
Debbie, you may be surprised at how little printing and distribution costs, due to economies of scale. For a mass market paperback that can be well under $1 per copy. All other costs will be the same.

At the end of the day, however, production costs are only one factor in deciding what price to charge. Publishers have taxes, wages, utilities, bank charges, and other bills to pay and will charge whatever they think the public is willing to pay in order to meet those costs and make a profit.

For the hours of entertainment a book provides me with I think the prices are very good when compared to other forms of entertainment, and I don't even look at the price of a paper copy as that's not what I want.

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 10:48:56 AM PDT
Another kitten killed? *shakes head at the sadness of it all*

Posted on May 24, 2012 10:50:34 AM PDT
saraf says:
*Banging head on desk, repeatedly. Once for each time the question has been asked. I'm gonna be here a loooooooong time.*

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 10:50:39 AM PDT
I like dogs better anyways. Cats are evil.

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 10:52:29 AM PDT
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In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 10:52:45 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 24, 2012 11:08:11 AM PDT
Because pricing is based upon market pressure. People are willing to pay that much, so the producers charge that much.

(Ah hell, I sound like a libertarian now.)

They cost so much because all those union electrons want to pad their pensions.

(Oops, now I sound like a tea partier.)

They cost so much because government regulations require they pay high taxes.

(Now I'm Grover Norquist)

They cost so much because each electron has to support hundreds of neutrinos living without mass or the ability to interact with other particles.

(Now I am a nerdy socialist.)

The real reason? Because you are paying for the information, not the medium. Think of a DVD. Burning the DVD, printing the label and stuffing it all together for sale costs pennies, and not very many. (Last I checked it was about $.12) But you buy the DVD of the latest movie and you are going to pay $30. You are paying for the MOVIE, not the DISK. Books are the same, you are paying for the story, not the paper and ink.

Posted on May 24, 2012 11:00:47 AM PDT
As often as this has been discussed, I can't imagine there's much more to say. I'm very pleased, generally, with prices of the ebooks I buy. If I wasn't, I wouldn't buy them. If you're only interested in reading best sellers, you may not save much by choosing ebooks over print editions but if you're willing to try new authors and/or spend a little time searching for good, reasonably-priced ebooks by established authors, you'll find plenty.

Before ebooks became common, I spent countless hours searching through used book stores in order to feed my insatiable appetite for something new to read. Now, I always have an abundance of books to read and spend much less than I did for traditional books.

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 11:06:08 AM PDT
Jazzy_Jeff says:
So? Don't buy them....

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 11:07:06 AM PDT
Jazzy_Jeff says:
That is not why the government is suing them...

Posted on May 24, 2012 11:11:47 AM PDT
T. Cook says:
"The Department of Justice is suing Apple and major book publishers like Macmillan and HarperCollins over the pricing of e-books.
The Justice Department is alleging that Apple worked with publishers to artificially raise e-book prices."

I believe to "artificially raise e-book prices" means ebooks are more expensive than the government believes they should be, hence "cost too much"...

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 11:12:27 AM PDT
❤ Ann says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 11:13:26 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 24, 2012 11:14:44 AM PDT
Nope. They aren't being sued because of the prices. They are being sued because of the alleged backroom deals that were made to GET to those prices. It's a subtle but very important distinction.

Actually, it's not even that subtle.

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 11:17:11 AM PDT
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In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 11:17:59 AM PDT
Do you have a ceiling cat? And is he watching you?

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 11:18:28 AM PDT
Cassie Anne says:
Why do you feel the story is worth less if it's delivered electronically? I personally don't value the paper, ink, or binding of most of the paper books I own. I have paper books that have a great deal of sentimental value - mostly books from my childhood - but for the most part, it's the ~story~ I value.

If you don't think ebooks are worth the cost, don't buy them. It's that simple.

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2012 11:19:28 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 24, 2012 11:20:04 AM PDT
Nope. Just basement cat. Actually, he hangs around underneath my kitchen window. He has the yellowist eyes I've ever seen. He's evil incarnate.

"But also cute and fluffy!!" (name that movie)

Edit: yellowest?
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Discussion in:  Kindle forum
Participants:  44
Total posts:  307
Initial post:  May 24, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 11, 2012

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