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Export a kindle book for reading on a different device


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Initial post: Jan 30, 2012 2:43:45 AM PST
Hello,
I am a "forced" kindle ebook user, in the sense that I had to bougth a book in kindle format for an online course I want to attend to.
The course teachers gave us two options: printed book or kindle. I already own an old sony ebook reader, and I've choosen to buy the kindle version thinking that it could not be a problem exporting it to another format (pdf, epub or something similar) to reading it on my ebook reader. It was quite a surprise to me discover that this it not the case. Is there any way to export it, or should I forget this ?
thanks in advance
bye
Nicola

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 2:49:24 AM PST
Jazzy_Jeff says:
Not legally.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 3:01:44 AM PST
Denis Powell says:
If you've only recently bought it you should be able to get a refund. Go to "Manage Your Kindle" and see if it's an option. If it isn't, contact Customer Services and explain.

Posted on Jan 30, 2012 3:09:15 AM PST
You can get the Kindle program free for your computer and read the book there. Google "Kindle for PC".

Posted on Jan 30, 2012 3:44:09 AM PST
I am actually reading the book on Kindle for PC.
The existence of this free (and nice, I must say) app was very well indicated, both by the course's site and amazon .
What I think it is a little, how can I call it, "incorrectness", is that, in the kindle amazon pages it is not clearly stated that
this export feature is not permitted.
I think that several other people could, like me, think that export in different formats should be possible, and, since it is not the case, a serious
vendor like amazon should state it with much much more visibility.

Posted on Jan 30, 2012 3:59:15 AM PST
CBRetriever says:
I am not sure any of the other ebook vendors say so either. I can't figure out why else so many people are asking if they can put their B&N ebooks on their kindles.

Posted on Jan 30, 2012 5:31:10 AM PST
My point is different. I haven't bought a Kindle.
I've bought an ebook.
If I buy a pdf, could I export it in, say, txt or not ?
This is the case/question

Posted on Jan 30, 2012 5:40:52 AM PST
to further clarify my position:
it is the same when I buy a music cd.
Am I allowed or not to rip this cd to listen it on my mp3 player ?
To me it is the same scenario.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 5:43:04 AM PST
To the publishers and e-book readers, it is not the same scenario.

You could have purchased a Nook book, and been able to read it on their app. But you wouldn't be able to convert it read on a Kindle.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 5:48:12 AM PST
Actually, with free Calibre software you can convert from Mobi format to ePub, and from ePub to Mobi (Amazon format to other ereaders & the reverse). However you can't do this when the book is DRM 'protected', legally.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 6:24:35 AM PST
Nicola Farina says: "What I think it is a little, how can I call it, 'incorrectness', is that, in the kindle amazon pages it is not clearly stated that this export feature is not permitted."

From the Kindle Licence Agreement and Terms of Use => "Use of Digital Content. Upon your download of Digital Content and payment of any applicable fees (including applicable taxes), the Content Provider grants you a non-exclusive right to view, use, and display such Digital Content an unlimited number of times, solely on the Kindle or a Reading Application or as otherwise permitted as part of the Service, solely on the number of Kindles or Other Devices specified in the Kindle Store, and solely for your personal, non-commercial use. Digital Content is licensed, not sold, to you by the Content Provider."

"I think that several other people could, like me, think that export in different formats should be possible,"

eBooks have always been this way since their introduction in the late 80s. The majority of eBooks sold have always had DRM (Digital Rights Management) that locked them to whatever device the book seller supported. There have, on occasion, been ones that were sold w/o DRM so people could convert them to other formats for other devices. But that's fairly rare. Though with the massive increase in new eBook customers, I can understand new people not understanding this.

Keep in mind, so far it is only the music industry that the consumers have successfully pushed for the end of DRM. The movie, software and book industries have not yet ended their support and use of DR, and it doesn't seem like they will change their tune any time soon. :(

"If I buy a pdf, could I export it in, say, txt or not ?"

Typically.. no.

"it is the same when I buy a music cd.
Am I allowed or not to rip this cd to listen it on my mp3 player ?
To me it is the same scenario."

It is a different scenario. The same scenario would be if you bought a paper book and wanted to scan it into a digital format for use on a portable device. Ever since scanners and pdfs made this possible students and others have been asking publishers if they could do that (scan a purchased paper book into pdf format for use on a computer/PDA). Publishers never answer the question. They also never bother the people who do do that and admit to doing it. The implication being that they are OK with it to some degree.

Now.. with eBooks you have something entirely different. What you have is a digital format that can be locked with DRM. In order to convert the format you would need to break the DRM. Breaking the DRM is illegal and copyright holders have the legal right to place DRM on digital copyrighted files in order to control their use and distribution. So far nobody has successfully petitioned the US Copyright office for the right to remove DRM on eBooks for the purposes of changing the file format for use on different devices.

But, that said, similar to what I mentioned about scanning books... no publisher has ever gone after an individual user for breaking DRM for the sole purpose of changing formats and devices on an eBook they paid for even when they admit to it. They only really care about illegal distribution. So even though it is illegal to remove the DRM from the ebook files, currently the publishers won't bother you over it. They just want their money from you for the book.

Posted on Jan 30, 2012 6:34:21 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 30, 2012 6:35:25 AM PST
larsona says:
Here's the thing--

Amazon has THEIR OWN ebook format, but that doesn't limit it to just kindle format. Using the kindle email address, you can send books in the ePub format and PDF format. But, because Amazon has their own format, you can only read it with a kindle eReader, app, software (on pc), and cloud reader. But that's why there are so many ways to read a kindle book... so you can't just read a kindle book on anything. To address the copywrite ishue, as long as you own the book, or are borrowing it from the public library, it's perfectly legal.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 6:38:57 AM PST
larsona says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 6:43:08 AM PST
Just Peachy says:
I would be most of those B&N books have DRM which would keep you from doing that conversion.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 12:58:19 PM PST
Think of it a different way. Users of Xbox 360 have the option to purchase games through their gaming system and download it directly into the system. They only have the rights to use that game on the intended machine. If that same person has a Playstation 3, they have to purchase the game again in the PS3 format. Same situation exists in the ebook world.

Posted on Jan 30, 2012 1:15:38 PM PST
Thank you all for the clarifications. It seems that I was indeed not well informed but, again, I think it could be very simple for Amazon to add a very big warning on the Kindle for X environment page (something like "Warning: kindle (both reader and software) doesn't allow to export in other formats nor reading on other devices/software and so on").
I usually don't read license agreement in detail of product I purchase, especially if I already have an idea of what I'm going to buy. This is, again, my fault.
By the way: in some way this also mean that my old prs 505 sony is far more flexible than kindle reader, something I could not expect,before.
(before you tell me I've understood that I can import but it seems a much more complicated process).

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 1:17:56 PM PST
Where have you ever seen advertising for a product that calls attention to something the product DOES NOT do?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 1:20:48 PM PST
Just Peachy says:
That would explain why my Kindle has not yet cleaned the cat litter box.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 1:22:22 PM PST
Just Peachy says:
They are called "Kindle ebooks". Doesn't that give you a clue? On the product page of a Kindle ebook there is a little blurb that says "Don't have a Kindle? Get one here" and a link. Yet another clue.

If you see software from Microsoft do you expect it to say "Does NOT run on Macs"?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 1:23:32 PM PST
Only the 3G Fire with the camera does litter boxes.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 1:24:12 PM PST
I'm still really annoyed that my new Jeep doesn't fly. I mean they really should have put some sort of notice on the website saying, "Vehicle intended for land use only. Does not fly."

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 1:25:44 PM PST
"If I buy a pdf, could I export it in, say, txt or not ?"

No, normally if you buy a PDF format book it is locked so it cannot be exported either.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 1:27:05 PM PST
Erich - clearly you haven't tried hard enough. I've found that my sister's Jeep would fly for quite a ways with sufficient speed and the right landscape.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 30, 2012 1:28:20 PM PST
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on Jan 30, 2012 1:44:44 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 30, 2012 1:45:10 PM PST
Some more missing Kindle product disclaimers.

Caution : Kindle does not allow the owner to travel faster than light.
Not responsible for hives, boils, or scabies.
Not to be used as a flotation device.
Does not protect against HIV or other STDs.
Chocking hazard if chopped up into little bits and fed to children.
Will NOT bail you out of jail for trying to score illicit drugs from your neighbor's twelve year old.
Would not, could not, with a mouse. Would not, could not, in a house.
Will damage most known record needles.
Use of this device will not render that nice Nigerian gent who e-mailed you trustworthy.
The Kindle will not bring the dead back to life.
Using the Kindle as a plate to hold a burrito as it microwaves will void your warranty.
Models with Text to Speech will talk to you, but will not give 'best man' speeches at your wedding.
The distorted face you see on your screen is not the Kindle - please resume taking your medication.
This is not Tron ; you can not use your Kindle as an Identity Disc.
THERE. IS. NO. CAMERA!
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Discussion in:  Kindle forum
Participants:  24
Total posts:  50
Initial post:  Jan 30, 2012
Latest post:  Apr 12, 2013

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