Customer Discussions > Kindle forum

Disabled - kindle is usually the only option - pricing is unfair


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 76-100 of 158 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on May 6, 2012 9:53:40 PM PDT
Sorry, I thought you meant you got a book for $14.95 in addition to the subscription.

For people who really like audiobooks, that is a pretty good price. Even though I discontinued my membership I was still able to take advantage of the "Buy four books and get $10" where the books were $0.99. Did you get that one? (They were out of copyright, but still great books.)

In reply to an earlier post on May 6, 2012 9:55:05 PM PDT
Blaiz, I'm sticking with mine for a full 12 months because I took advantage of the free $100 toward a device for my SO (Significant Other, not Special Offers). So I'm obligated to it, but I still think it's a decent deal.

In reply to an earlier post on May 6, 2012 9:55:39 PM PDT
I get a lot of audiobooks through the library. I love to listen when I'm driving or cooking, etc. It really depends on the book how well I listen.

I just finished two that had me spellbound, and both were children's books.

Rodzina

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane

In reply to an earlier post on May 6, 2012 9:56:16 PM PDT
That's a great deal you got, Ed.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 1:32:15 AM PDT
I pay $26 for 2 credits a month, but then they have huge sales as well...i think they have a 3 for 2 trilogy sale coming up; they just got done with their half-price sale etc; they have an annual first books in series for 4.95

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 1:57:17 AM PDT
Sue says:
I love your post Blaiz. I agree with you totally. I am not disable but have a lot of health problems--very expensive health problems. I work full time but do not make tons of money. I have found a lot of books on the free sites and will be starting to borrow books from the KOLL. This is the only way I can aquire books to read.

I do not believe that just because a person is disabled that they are entitled to special prices. Amazon has many sources to get lower priced or free books for people.

Kudos to you Blaiz.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 1:59:40 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 7, 2012 2:00:59 AM PDT
Dorothy, the world has not targeted you. Everyone pays the same price. You really aren't the center of the universe. I've been getting books from Amazon for my Kindle for a few years and yes, I have found hardbacks that cost more than the Kindle Edition. I remember once in a bookstore I selected a paperback to buy and on the way out I browsed the remaindered stacks and found the hardback of the same book for $2. But, I didn't throw myself down and bemoan how the world was against me.

Kindle certainly isn't the only option. You could get a Nook or one of the other e-readers. I'm sure you would be happier.

So, Dorothy, good-bye.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 2:24:55 AM PDT
Judy says:
Not to take away from Amazon, but have you looked at thrift stores and yard sales? You would be shocked at the folks who read a book and then get rid of them right away. I have found plenty of best sellers and great reads this way.

Posted on May 7, 2012 6:04:16 AM PDT
I do the Light Listener Audible membership. I don't get any credits, but it's only $10/year and allows me to take advantage of all the sales and member pricing.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 6:53:59 AM PDT
Grimlock says:
They tried to negotiate. They tried to play hardball.

Either they let the publisher set the prices, or they wouldn't be able to be allowed to provide them at all. This is no fault of Amazon's. And they don't have as much influence as you think, partly because they have to do right by their customers. When they said we won't carry any of MacMillian's books at the agency model prices, the customers demanded access to the books.

Amazon's company line is to be the most customer-centric company, so they did what they could, and then listened to what their customers wanted.

Posted on May 7, 2012 6:54:41 AM PDT
Article about the DOJ's involvement in this situation:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304444604577337573054615152.html

Posted on May 7, 2012 7:56:11 AM PDT
Twishy says:
I always find it amusing when people blame Amazon for the prices of books. Book prices are set by the publisher. Amazon has little control over that. The Big 6 threw their weight around and made sure Amazon had to charge more for their books. They tied Amazon's hand. They would not allow Amazon to sell their books for less than what they set the price. If Amazon had refused, you wouldn't even be able to buy the books on the website. Fear not, however, the DOJ and several states are suing the Big 6 so perhaps prices will drop a bit.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 8:04:58 AM PDT
Is it me or is it starting to sound like Amazon doesn't like Canadians?

I knew they'd come around! :O)

Posted on May 7, 2012 8:21:14 AM PDT
CBRetriever says:
rememeber back in the days when the HB came out first and book stores didn't discount at all (amazon didn't exist back then) - people would just be patient and wait until the PB came out or go to the library. When the PB comes out, the price will take a big dive.

Seems like everyone feels discriminated against lately:

1. People outside the US who can't get their kindle fires to work
2. People who can't buy a book from the other kindle stores
3. People in certain countries who can't receive any kindle content
4. People who can't can't see
5. People who want kindles in sanskrit, russian, japanese, etc
6. Add your own to the list

me, I'm just patient - I wait until the price is what I want and I waited until the Kindle Touch was what I needed before I bought it (I needed something that would act as a translator)

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 8:37:34 AM PDT
CSam says:
@Cynthia J. Mayer-It wasn't me, but funny about the coincidence in usernames. I only use CSam for Amazon.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 8:52:56 AM PDT
King Al says:
Would you prefer Amazon to INCREASE the price of the hardcover so that it costs more than the Kindle version? As has been pointed out to you many times before, Amazon has no control over the price of the ebooks. Amazon fought the publishers and lost.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 9:03:12 AM PDT
CSam - thanks for answering. Yes it is funny! Hello anyhow, and I wish you well. :)

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 10:09:37 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 7, 2012 10:52:12 AM PDT
Without going into TOO many details, here are two quick reasons why the big publishers should lower the prices of their Kindle editions to more reasonable levels:

1) Current market trends on booksales show that eBooks are rapidly catching up, and in many cases surpassing, sales of their paper counterparts. When the big publishers hold their Kindle books to a high price, they are ignoring the current market and cheating their authors. They get a lot of sales on the paper versions, and much fewer on the Kindle versions. This should be the other way around, and this trend is going to increase as Kindle and other book reading devices become more popular. There is also the 'Green Factor,' which means more and more people are forgoing paper for electronic, to save trees etc.

2) It is inherently not fair. In the paper versions, publishers release at 55% off the actual price embedded in the EAN/Bookland barcode. This enables sellers room to make a profit. No such trade rate exists for these publishers eBooks. Yet...the Kindle version has little or no overhead after its creation and release. There is no paper to buy, no print cost, no shipping, no need to buy and warehouse thousands of copies for distribution. All of the initial costs of producing the book were borne when the paper version was published. The Kindle version can be created from the original files in a single day or less, and then released.

What the big publishers are attempting to do is nothing more than artificially holding Kindle prices higher than the market will bear. They lose sales by doing this, but it helps them prop up their paper sales. Their big fear is that paper sales will drop and Kindle sales will increase dramatically. They should not be afraid of this, since this is where the market is going anyway.

An important point to remember is that the book business itself, as controlled by the big publishers, has been stagnant since the 90's. And much of this is because of the system they created. They do NOT like the current situation. But that is too bad, and consumers will eventually force them into more reasonable, more realistic pricing. Basically, Kindle and digital print publishing are now shaping the book market...and the big publishers are desperately trying to keep market share from slipping away from them to the smaller presses.

The end result: ALL of the 2,000 or so registered US trade publishers will find themselves on a more level playing field, and the big guys will have to face reality about the 21st century book market: Ebooks will outsell paper versions by a great number, whether you try to artificially keep it from happening or not.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 10:27:53 AM PDT
"1) Current market trends on booksales show that eBooks are rapidly catching up, and in many cases surpassing, sales of their paper counterparts."

So if they are selling that well at the higher prices, why on earth would the publishers lower them?

"2) It is inherently not fair."

Whoever told you that life would be fair (fair as determined by you, of course), lied.

As long as consumers continue to buy at these prices (and we do), the publishers are under no pressure to lower them. Their stockholders would pitch fits if they did.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 10:38:25 AM PDT
I'm short. Wouldn't it be more fair if shorter people got lower prices for e books? It's bad enough that size 6 dresses cost the same as size 16 and size 5 shoes cost the same as size 10. So I should get a break on something for being small. Come on, Amazon! Be fairer to me than to others.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 10:41:57 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Aug 8, 2012 7:23:28 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 10:43:47 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 7, 2012 10:48:46 AM PDT
M. Francis comments:

'"1) Current market trends on booksales show that eBooks are rapidly catching up, and in many cases surpassing, sales of their paper counterparts."

So if they are selling that well at the higher prices, why on earth would the publishers lower them?

"2) It is inherently not fair."

Whoever told you that life would be fair (fair as determined by you, of course), lied.

As long as consumers continue to buy at these prices (and we do), the publishers are under no pressure to lower them. Their stockholders would pitch fits if they did..."

Robert replies: You missed the part where I said that the big publishers were NOT selling as many Kindle versions. 'Current market trends' refers to the broader picture of the 2,000 or so US trade publishers, most of whom are not Random House. The big publishers are selling less Kindles and more paper, which is only because they price their Kindle versions so high. This flies in the face of the current book market. They do this in an attempt to force consumers to continue to buy the paper versions.

And why should bookbuyers care about the stockholders of publishing companies, anyway? Most probably don't. They only ask a fair deal. Think about it: The only publishers in the US trying to charge fat prices for Kindle books are the ones who think the book market should remain as it is. They are not facing reality. They don't even offer the same trade rate (55% off the retail) that they do for their paper versions. So most sellers don't bother listing them because they can't make a profit. The big publishers could at least offer the trade rate so that jobbers ('Also available from these sellers') could compete. Their entire policy is nothing more than attempted price-fixing for eBooks, to prop up paper sales.

I wouldn't worry, though. Sooner or later they will have to come to reality.

Posted on May 7, 2012 10:48:37 AM PDT
I think the OP is over at the Little Debbie site, complaining that Nutty Bars should cost less for her.

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 11:00:17 AM PDT
Don't go bringing your midget angst into these forums. We're trying to have an intelligible conversation here!

In reply to an earlier post on May 7, 2012 11:05:55 AM PDT
Bufo Calvin says:
Excellent, Blaiz! I'm glad that can help you.

The USA had a specific thing called the "Chafee Amendment" that really helped make new books available in accessible editions for certain populations. That's part of why I'm not sure what's available in other countries....I've read the relevant law for the US because of my interest in text-to-speech.
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


Recent discussions in the Kindle forum

Discussion Replies Latest Post
Announcement
Enjoy your print books and personal documents on your Kindle with Kindle Convert.
0 28 days ago
Announcement
Have a Kindle Question?
0 Sep 12, 2012
Operating Systems 0 9 minutes ago
ECHO's of Friendship 925 9 minutes ago
Priced too high! 13 14 minutes ago
Magazines on Kindle Fire 22 30 minutes ago
Free Books & Chat - Monday, March 2, 2015 33 35 minutes ago
Fire stick drops network connection 553 36 minutes ago
Cancel 4 37 minutes ago
Discounted / Price Dropped Kindle eBooks III 5349 38 minutes ago
charger 5 39 minutes ago
OT: Discussion - (Freebie Books Links Only) 3063 43 minutes ago
 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Kindle forum
Participants:  54
Total posts:  158
Initial post:  May 6, 2012
Latest post:  May 7, 2012

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 2 customers

Search Customer Discussions