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FREE Books and Chat - Friday, Nov. 9, 2012

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Showing 1-25 of 196 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Nov 10, 2012 3:32:48 PM PST
JoJoPALS - Moist heat packs are a bit different, but most of the "grain" type qualify as such. You can also have a damp washcloth wrapped around it to have more moisture. Just keep turning the washcloth to keep the heat next to your jaw. The microwave bags will help keep it warm longer so you don't have to keep getting up and down.
My doc also told me that a plain old hot water bottle qualifies as a moist heat pack too. :)


In reply to an earlier post on Nov 10, 2012 11:23:18 AM PST
JoJoPNW says:
Thanks for the tips. I already have the gel icepacks and i have a couple of microwaveable heating pads filled with grains. So I'm set. I thought moist heat packs were something different.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 10, 2012 8:02:02 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 10, 2012 8:05:38 AM PST

What do you do for Thanksgiving in Florida Ketta? Do you cook yourself, spend the day with friends, go to a restaurant? Do you make those creamed onions for yourself?

What a nice thing your parents do inviting these young servicemen to Thanksgiving dinner. They are probably away from home at Thanksgiving for the first time and missing home so much. Your Mom gives them a little slice of home.

ETA... Happy Birthday Ketta!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 10, 2012 7:57:16 AM PST
Happy Birthday Ketta!

When you mentioned creamed onions I remembered once my parents invited a couple, their friends to join us for Thanksgiving. As we are all sitting down, right by my Dad's plate is a bowl of creamed onions. And he says, "WHAT are these?" Now we had never had them before and we had new people joining us, so duh!! Embarrassing for a few minutes, then we all laughed! They had known this couple since their school days, so they loved my Dad too!

Posted on Nov 10, 2012 7:17:24 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 10, 2012 7:20:16 AM PST
Ketta says:
When we lived in the same metropolitan area, Thanksgiving was always at Mom & Dad's house and it was a big deal. We had a dinner similar to many mentioned here, with the exception being I've heard no one else mention creamed onions. That is the one dish that makes the holidays for me (as our T'day and Xmas meals were quite similar).

Now that they're in NC and I'm in FL, we do get together at Xmas, but to celebrate Thanksgiving now, Mom & Dad host 2 or 3 young military guys who can't get home to be with family, so Mom still does the big spread. She says they are super-polite, very appreciative and oh-so-very-very young!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 9:48:22 PM PST
Zoo Keeper says:
Someone would need Valium. Maybe, if smurphy goes, the boys could be shipped by UPS or FedEX?? lol

I think it has a great impact. Hubby still talks about the girl's father who took the time to show off his gun collection when Hubby picked her up for a first date. That was over 45 yrs ago. He said he had her home 15 mins before curfew, just in case.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 9:20:01 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 9, 2012 9:24:10 PM PST
My oldest brother had a habit of just happening to be cleaning one of his guns (he was a trader/collector) it seemed every time I brought a special young man home lolol. Have to say that made his point quite effectively without him having to say a word. Of course it didn't hurt that he was 6'2", 305 lbs either. The grizzly bear with the heart of a teddy bear. I really miss him...

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 9:17:21 PM PST
Zoo, I'm with your husband! Sometime times just going to and from school with 3 boys in the back was an ordeal and that was only a 15 minute drive. 12 hours would require Valium, for the kids! LOL

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 9:09:52 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 9, 2012 9:12:38 PM PST
Zoo Keeper says:
When Hubby lived in TX he drove back to KY about twice a year, 20 hr. drive. He had 3 kids under 7 during at that time.

He said tonight he'd rather eat a bologna sandwich than even think of putting two teenage boys, who didn't want to go, and 2 young kids in a car and take them anywhere, let alone 12 hrs. He wants to know if you go, so he can watch the news for boys abandoned along the highway. LOL (He's sure that's something he'd consider doing. lol)

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 9:02:44 PM PST
4Nbahu says:
@ SoManyBooks North Indian, South Indian, Thai, Mongolian, Lebanese, Spanish Tapas.

How about special American Regional Dishes i.e New England Clam Chowder, Cincinnati Style Chili, New Orleans Shrimp Gumbo, California Wraps, Hawaii Poi (not that I know what that is), Pulled Pork, New York Reubens,

Cold Plate Special (everything has to be able to be served cold or room temperature, not to mention prepared before hand)

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 9:00:02 PM PST
KayKay says:
I have opened Saturday albeit a little early. Gonna try to grab a few winks and check back in a little while.

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 8:51:19 PM PST
It's late and I'm sure many of you are already heading off the bed, but I want to thank everyone for making today so special here on FB&C.

I loved your hearing your stories of Thanksgiving past and present. I loved hearing your menu plans and seeing that we are all connected by our desire to spend these special moments with the people we love and we always remember those loved ones who are gone, but never forgotten.

We may live in different cities and countries, but in many ways we have a lot in common. Thanks again for a great day.....

LOB ;o)

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 8:51:08 PM PST
4Nbahu says:
@ Smurphy, if you stay home try just getting a dinner from someplace like Cracker Barrel and bring it home. My best friends has done it forever. She says it tastes better than anything she can make without the fuss.

As for cousin bonding, I had to work very hard at that w/ my kids cousins being 12,500 miles away. If you are in the hotel and they are in the house, bonding becomes harder. Why not invite the kids for a long weekend when the stress of "holiday" isn't there.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 8:47:40 PM PST
Zoo Keeper says:
I think we're all petrified to bring home our young man. I think my grandfathers and uncles were worse than my dad. Some were jokersters and others were interrogators. You never knew what was going to happen.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 8:38:12 PM PST
What a lovely story 4Nbahu of your Thanksgiving growing up at your Grandma's house. Thank you for sharing. Such special memories. I'm sure your husband to be was petrified too!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 8:28:25 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 9, 2012 8:45:48 PM PST
4Nbahu says:
Growing up, we always went to my Grandma's house for Thanksgiving. So in a teeny tiny house there would be 6 adults and 5 children. The men would take the back room to watch football all day. The women would be in the kitchen all day. We cousins would be in and out, up and over. While I never lived in the country, I come from country stock. So growing up this is what would end up on the table....
Turkey, Stuffed w/ a sage dressing, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, potato salad, macaroni salad, green beans, baked beans, succatash, corn, homemade chicken & dumplings, deviled eggs, ham, fried oysters, dinner rolls (first batch usually burnt), followed by pumpkin pie, banana split cake, jello sometimes. canned cranberry sauce and sometimes vanilla wafer banana pudding pie

The main meal would be eaten around 1:30 with of course the men eating first at the dining table. the kids would get tv trays and take over the back room. Once the women washed up they would sit in the living room. Everyone would just moan and groan until around 5:30 when people would start "picking", taking a little bit of this and a little bit of that out of the fridge until finally everyone was no longer nibbling. Then came the packing of the doggie bags. By the time we started dating the boyfriends would show up for awhile.

I can still remember my husband's face the first time he was invited in to the house for a holiday. My grandma told my grandpa "it was only right that 4Nbahu could bring her young man to dinner", after all we had been dating for over a year and a half. Luckily it went very smoothly. I can smile now, but I was petrified then.

edited for canned cranberry sauce and sometimes vanilla wafer banana pudding pie.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 8:27:37 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 9, 2012 8:29:07 PM PST

Thank you for such an interesting insight into how you celebrate each others holidays. So fascinating and in many ways so similar. Food, family and friends and fun. Also lots of work. I am always happy for the holidays to come and happy to see them go! It seems to start with Halloween, especially if you have young children and is nonstop until after New Years. It is exhausting!

I can see why Christmas is your husbands favorite. There is a magical quality to Christmas and who can resist Santa Claus? Christmas always seems to bring out the best in people and that is something special to see.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 8:27:19 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 9, 2012 8:29:16 PM PST
Zoo Keeper says:
I'm tired and all I did was read your post. How do you keep up with that schedule? It is great to hear other traditions.

It was nice of your inlaws to try to give you a Christmas when you joined their family.

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 8:23:57 PM PST
GrammaKathy says:

Someone mentioned earlier looking for pumpkin cheesecake. This link has 22 pumpkin recipes and several pumpkin cheesecake

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 8:12:30 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 9, 2012 9:05:00 PM PST
4Nbahu says:
@LOB We celebrate each other's holidays. Which makes Oct-Dec exhausting.

First we get Dusserha (Rama defeatin Ravana), normally just a simple unch w/ close relatives. (Most Eastern Religious holidays are moon based so this can start anywhere from Sept to Oct)

Then for the next 21 days it is major party central while everyone plays 3 card poker late into the night. When we were younger we played perhaps 12 of the 21 nights, now we are down to only around 5 nights. Heavy snacks (kebabs) served all night, followed by dinner normally served after midnight. It is supposed to be good luck to lose at this time. (Got in at 3 am last night, friends of ours have an annual cards party where there are up to 5 tables with 8 people each table. stakes vary from penny ante to OMG where did the rent money go :) I always sit at the cheap table)

Then Diwali (Rama returns Home) where we light candles all around the house, followed by fireworks (done from the house, scary scary), then dinner. So each house sets off fireworks for about 2 hours. the air gets thick with smoke and the noise. By midnight I am always so exhausted sleep comes easily.

Then I get to breathe. Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday bar none. Only problem is, I married into a family of vegetarians. I tried having Thanksgiving at my house the first couple of years, but it just didn't translate well. So we have been inviting another family to the American Club for the past 10 years or so. It has been a lovely tradition that even the kids look forward to.

Then there is Christmas, which strangely is one of my husband's favorite holidays. So every year we have a Christmas party, which started when my in-laws tried to do something special my first Christmas here. We have relatives that actually plan their Winter Vacation to here around our party date. It is an open house for ALL of the family and friends. I used to cook the food for the event until the number of attendees hit 80. I couldn't handle the numbers after that. So now I just make cookies, chocolate chip, grasshopper, brownies, oatmeal, no bakes for the vegetarians and usually one other different. I spend a week baking around 60 dozen, because people want their doggie bags. It is exhausting and fun. On Christmas Day itself we keep it just for us, we normally go out for a brunch buffet so that I don't have to work. When the kids were little I would take the kids to the American Club for their Christmas Party the week before so they could see Santa Claus and attend a little Christmas fair.

This is then followed by New Years at a friends house. I then collapse.

edited because I wrote the wrong reason for the holiday

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 8:00:08 PM PST
Zoo Keeper says:
B J.
I'm with LOB on this one. I'd give it a try and see what happens. Then again, I do lots of "kitchen experiments" so I may be the wrong person to chime in. (most work, some don't. Son hasn't let me forget the failed rice and tomato thing I attempted. It was awful!!!)

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 8:00:06 PM PST
KY Bk Addict says:
Just received my new Paperwhite Kindle!! Only ordered it Nov. 1st. So far I just love it. It is much faster than my Kindle Touch, but that may be because of all of books on it. Still learning how everything works, but love the lighted screen.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 7:55:59 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 9, 2012 7:59:45 PM PST

I am not Charlie-bird, but you can make moist heat packs with rice, flax seed or feed corn. Put it in a sock and tie off. Flax seed and feed corn won't get the odor rice will after a few uses, but you just pour the rice out and add new. A handful of dried lavender added (or any herb you like) is soothing.
For a flexible cold pack put 2 cups of water, 1 cup of rubbing alcohol in a sturdy ziploc and squeeze the air out. It will freeze into a "slushy" form and fit around whatever body part you need it for. Much more cost effective than the gel packs.

Good luck with your surgery and hope that helps. :)


ETA: Don't use cracked corn. Might be a good idea to double the ziploc bags too. :)

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 7:48:55 PM PST

Possibly Thai? French? German? So many choices and so much fun! I hope you'll come back and let us know what you decide on.

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 7:47:23 PM PST
Coach D says:
When I can find it, my favorite is Dr. Pepper (made with real sugar) in a COLD glass bottle on a HOT summer day!
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Discussion in:  Kindle forum
Participants:  54
Total posts:  196
Initial post:  Nov 8, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 10, 2012

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