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Australian kindle users thread #2 (Kiwis welcome)

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In reply to an earlier post on Jun 16, 2012 9:14:22 PM PDT
Loz says:
Tui, two of my cousins had prem babies, both sets of twin girls. They were in intensive care for a few months, but now one set has just turned 3 and are crazy and the other set has just turned 1 and are gorgeous. Both healthy, so 10 weeks might sound scary, but the advances in the medical field to care for tiny babies is amazing.

I wish your daughter all the best! :)

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 16, 2012 9:15:44 PM PDT
Tui Allen says:
KindleKate, so strange you mention the Patupaiarehe in relation to Heather's baby. On the bike ride I mentioned above where I was so sure they were flitting around us in the bush, it was almost as if they were reassuring me, because I had these amazing thoughts about the baby and how it would be like Rikoriko in my story and bring healing to everyone who needed it. My daughter was given the name Heather but has always preferred the name Aroha and she actually has that name exquisitely tattooed on her arm. In my story Aroha is Rikoriko's mother.

Yes, Heather is a nature loving girl and the hospital situation was difficult for her. She's never had a day's ill-health in her life before becoming pregnant so the walk outside in the wheelchair was a big help.

Posted on Jun 16, 2012 9:21:27 PM PDT
Tui Allen says:
The name Rikoriko means "sparkle of light and energy" so if the baby has that quality she will survive the trials of an early birth. The doctors say that she is well positioned for early birth and very healthy in every way so her chances look good even if it happened now, but let's hope she gets as far as she can before it happens. I'm so grateful to Discus and Loz and others for their reassurances because if this baby comes prematurely it will be the first premature baby we've had in all my circle of friends and relatives. There's been the odd miscarriage but no prem babies, so my knowledge about it is zero. Everyone on this thread has been so reassuring.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 16, 2012 10:01:36 PM PDT
Oh that just makes me so envious!!!!

Posted on Jun 16, 2012 10:39:37 PM PDT
Pushka says:
My hubby is speaking at the Australian Booksellers Association Conference in Manly today. Will be interesting to hear how the word "digital" is viewed by them.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 16, 2012 11:07:37 PM PDT
That will be interesting, Ebook Observer. Is he speaking about digital books or on another topic?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 12:00:28 AM PDT
Suncoast says:
Ebook Observer - It will be interesting to hear what impact they think e-books are having on their sales and what they think about the e-book pricing policies of some Australian publishers.

Posted on Jun 17, 2012 12:34:52 AM PDT
@ Suncoast Reader:
I am looking forward to hearing his news!

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 12:46:07 AM PDT
I used to love my kindle. Now it is a pile of useless dung. In less than 18 months the screen has frozen and cannot be fixed. Amazon will replace it for $85. Thats a joke, if you buy electronic goods that are very well looked after you expect a reasonable life of at least 3-5 years. Kindles are garbage and inferior products. Buy one and be disappointed. I certainly am.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 1:23:55 AM PDT
Discus49 says:
I'd better not respond to this post - the Amazon Gestapo have me on their "list".

*Enter Julie stage left*

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 1:29:46 AM PDT
And your point is...?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 1:39:30 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 17, 2012 1:39:53 AM PDT
Loz says:
No electronic item with constant use like a kindle is going to last 5 years. Expecting it to is very naive.

It's not a joke that Amazon is willing to replace an out of warranty item for less than the cost of a new one. If you can find another company that would do that, I'd like to see it.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 1:54:54 AM PDT
Pushka says:
He writes business books and his next book is about being agile in a changing environment. So a pretty relevant topic for people selling books. Flying home later tonight and all I know is that it went well and has lots of ideas. And yesterday was talking about writing another book. I just got over the one he wrote! Currently that book is now being printed offshore. It will hit the bookshops on September 1.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 2:01:36 AM PDT
Sorry to hear your Kindle has died, Nicholas. However it was covered by the standard warranty of one year, like most electronics, and you can't really expect Amazon to honour expired warranties.

How long a device like a Kindle lasts depends on how much it is used and how it is treated. There have been comments on this forum that pressure on the screen may be one of the causes of screen problems. If you carry your Kindle around in a bag or backpack, even with a good cover on, it could still be subject to pressure on the screen.

Personally I feel I have had more than my money's worth from my Kindles in the two and a bit years I've had them, and I've been more than happy with Amazon's service. They have offered you a good deal on a replacement. In my opinion it is still the best eReader around and if mine broke tomorrow I'd buy a new one immediately.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 2:03:18 AM PDT
A very relevant topic indeed for publishers and booksellers ;-).

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 2:20:09 AM PDT
Discus49 says:
Thank you Julie - you put it so much better than I would have.....

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 2:24:04 AM PDT
I always make allowances for people whose Kindles have died. Once Nicholas has got over the initial anger at his Kindle dying he might reconsider, especially if he is an avid reader.

I use the same criteria to rate the value of a Kindle as I do clothes that I buy. An expensive item worn often can end up having a lower cost per wear than a cheap item only worn once or twice. My Kindle has so much use that the cost per minute of reading must be down to a cent or less. And my Kindles have more than paid for themselves in the amount of money I have saved buying books.

Posted on Jun 17, 2012 2:44:21 AM PDT
Tui Allen says:
I'm so pleased that you have all reassured me. My daughter is looking like its all getting going again. She was having painful contractions while I spoke to her on the phone tonight. I could be a grandmother very soon. But I've been told that the hospital she's now in, is the best spot in the entire southern hemisphere for a woman in her position to be. I told her to focus all her mind on the sensation of air going into her lungs and the air going out of them again.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 2:55:13 AM PDT
Loz says:
I'm sure she and the baby will both be fine. :)

Posted on Jun 17, 2012 3:35:57 AM PDT
Vico says:
TuI, if she is at the Mater then she is in very safe hands. The maternity hospitals in Brisbane (including Brisbane Womens/Mothers) are excellent. My niece started early labour at 24+ weeks. They managed to delay, pumping her with medicine to improve baby's lungs and bub hung in there until her due date. She is now 2 and a half.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 5:42:15 AM PDT
Alina says:
Tui, my niece was born at 30 weeks. A nurse friend of mine, with whom I share a brutally honest friendship (I was the first person she came out as gay to, because she needed practice before she came out to others) said "you realise she has a 50/50 chance and there's a good chance she could die". That humidicrib survivor is now 18 years old, has a big lunky boyfriend named Mark (a good guy) and is studying various things at TAFE and thinking of joining the police force.

Nowadays 4-5 weeks prem is NOTHING of medical consequence.

Posted on Jun 17, 2012 1:05:16 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 17, 2012 1:06:09 PM PDT
Tui Allen says:
My grand-daughter Mica, was born last night, just before midnight in Aussie time at the Mater hospital in Brisbane. She is 1.9kg and was born crying immediately, very healthy. I believe that weight is very good for such an early baby. She was premature by 10 weeks and one day, so she'll have a rocky start but is in good hands. I got the call half an hour later from James who'd also phoned earlier to tell me it was all under way and about to happen. I spoke to Heather who described herself as more relaxed than she'd ever felt in her life. James said she was not like just before the birth.
So Mica is a Gemini like her Grandma and Great Grandma.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 1:31:17 PM PDT
Caddis Nymph says:
Sorry you had that problem, Nicholas. We have three Kindle K2s and only one has had a problem. Kindle CS replaced it with no questions.

Posted on Jun 17, 2012 1:40:57 PM PDT
Vico says:
Tui, congratulations on the birth of Mica. Congratulations to Heather and James. She will be in very good hands at the Mater hospital.
Does this mean Grandma is coming for an earlier visit to Australia?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 1:48:30 PM PDT
BeeJay says:
Congratulations to Heather and Mica (and to Grandma of course) from another Gemini. We are good people
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Initial post:  May 29, 2012
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