Customer Discussions > Kindle forum

Ownership for Kindle Books


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 26-50 of 58 posts in this discussion
Posted on Dec 20, 2012 6:08:01 AM PST
L says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 6:21:52 AM PST
You DON'T own the words. You might own the paper and glue, but no matter what vehicle the book comes in, you do NOT own the book. It's called "intellectual property", and you don't own that; the author does.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 6:33:56 AM PST
L says:
Exactly!

I own the paper and glue. (The words <i>obviously</i> belong to the author). The book is mine, because I paid for it. I can read it again, hand it on to the next reader, or donate it to my favorite charity. But most importantly, I can actually READ the darn thing anytime and anyplace I want to. If Barnes and Noble stomped into my house and took my book BACK, I would have a pretty good legal case.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 6:36:22 AM PST
You are assuming that the author of said book was intellectual. Some best selling authors are as dumb as a rock. Just sayin'.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 6:44:18 AM PST
King Al says:
No, you do NOT own the mp3. You cannot give it away or sell it.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 6:47:01 AM PST
FlyingAce says:
In the case of the kindle, some of your statements are wrong.

'But you're going to deny me access to a book I purchased electronically because I want to read it on different computers/pads/pods?"

Wrong. when you buy a book from Amazon, you can read it on any kindle/Amazon reading app/computer you want, or up to about 6 at a time. (depending on the book) You can start reading on your kindle, then pick up where you left off on another device as long as you register that device to your account.

"But I don't like the idea that when I eventually sell my device that I lose all those books I paid for. "
Wrong, the books that you paid for are saved to your amazon account and are available on a new device via the archived books. The books will stay on the Kindle until you deregister and resync the device.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 6:49:46 AM PST
Painters don't care if the person who buys their painting has eyeballs or not.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 6:52:50 AM PST
Just Peachy says:
No one is going to take your ebook away.
You can read it any time and any place you want. You can hand it to another person to read (many ways to do this).

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:00:50 AM PST
LadyH95 says:
I just love that you reference a story from Aug 2009. Nothing like cutting edge research.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:01:50 AM PST
Cassie Anne says:
I can read my ebooks anytime and anyplace I want to. (Well, except for work. But that's because I don't want to get fired for reading on the job.) All I need to do is have them downloaded to my device - whatever that device may be.

Now, you do need a connection for the Cloud reader, but if you install a Kindle app on your device, and download the books, you can read them without a connection.

But the bottom line is, if ebooks aren't right for you, don't buy them. It's just that simple.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:06:36 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 20, 2012 7:07:59 AM PST
L says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:09:39 AM PST
Just Peachy says:
"When the Kindle app crashes, I lose my book. (I may still own it on paper, but if I can't read it, then it's gone). When my cable goes out - I lose my book. When I'm on vacation in the sticks, I lose my book. When your kindle device dies (which happens far too often) you lose your book.

"

WRONG - you don't lose your book. The book belongs to the account. Many people put their books in Calibre (a free app for the PC) so that if Amazon did go belly up they can strip the drm and still read their books. I think we will have some advance notice if Amazon shuts the doors.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:10:07 AM PST
Dog Lover says:
<When the Kindle app crashes, I lose my book. (I may still own it on paper, but if I can't read it, then it's gone). When my cable goes out - I lose my book. When I'm on vacation in the sticks, I lose my book. When your kindle device dies (which happens far too often) you lose your book.>

Wrong. The "book" is still on your archive for you to download it whenever you wish.

That "poor woman" was soundly and thoroughly discussed when that first went viral. She was definitely NOT innocent in the whole thing AND she could get to her books if she hadn't screwed everything up. Amazon (too readily, IMMHO) actually opened up a way to get over HER issue.

You simply do not know what you are talking about. You are behind the times and ill-informed.

DL

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:10:51 AM PST
The power can go out, Amazon can crash, and I can still read every book I've downloaded to my devices, until the power and Amazon are functional.

A Kindle can be put in a baggie and read in the tub, or even in the shower - try doing that with a paper book.

Just because e-books aren't your cup of whatever doesn't mean the rest of us are wrong.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:11:32 AM PST
Just Peachy says:
Oh, I don't normally read in the tub but I have a waterproof case for my Kindle if I decide to read near water. Also a ziploc bag works well for that situation.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:19:17 AM PST
Cassie Anne says:
You can solve this with a $69 Kindle. DL your books and read away. And I do read my Kindle in the bathtub. No problems.

But if hard copies work best for you, buy and read those. Ebooks work best for me, so that's what I buy and read.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:35:09 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 20, 2012 7:35:21 AM PST
LadyH95 says:
I read my Kindle in the tub every night. And I don't even use one of those waterproof covers. It's a risk I'm willing to take. The way I look at it, I hadn't dropped a paper book in the tub in over 10 years, I think my Kindle is safe. If / when the Kindle goes for a dunk, I'll use it as an excuse to replace my well loved, very extensively used Kindle with the newest, biggest, badest model available. I received a K2 for Christmas when they were first released and not actually shipped till February. I used for 3 years and got a KTouch just cuz. The K2i is still functioning.

I'm not worried about the stability of my eBook library with Amazon.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:38:54 AM PST
Jazzy_Jeff says:
I own every digital book I have ever purchased. I just make a backup copy of all of them and remove the DRM when needed. I had several books in Microsoft Reader format. They stopped supporting that a while ago. I just removed the DRM and converted them to read on my Kindle. There are always alternatives.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:49:18 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 20, 2012 7:54:29 AM PST
J. Gatie says:
>"When the Kindle app crashes, I lose my book. (I may still own it on paper, but if I can't read
>it, then it's gone). When my cable goes out - I lose my book. When I'm on vacation in the
>sticks, I lose my book. When your kindle device dies (which happens far too often) you lose
>your book."

You couldn't be more misinformed if your name was Emily Litella.

>This poor woman

>"http://www.nbcnews.com/technology/technolog/you-dont-own-your-kindle-books-amazon-
>reminds-customer-1C6626211

>was a snafu victim, and she lost all her books. But the very worst of it was the incredible time
>and HASSLE she must have gone through!"

I take that back, apparently you *are* more misinformed than Ms. Litella. The "victim" in question was guilty of making straw purchases which were forbidden for her country of purchase. She not only violated her contract with Amazon, she violated international copyrights. Even though she was in gross breach of contract, Amazon *still* bent over backwards to reinstate her account and get her legal purchases back to her. Still think she was a "snafu victim" who "lost all her books?"

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:51:16 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 20, 2012 7:55:41 AM PST
Edited, because I replied to a post that's more than a year old. Yikes!

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:52:43 AM PST
Jazzy_Jeff says:
That post is over a year old....

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:53:52 AM PST
Dog Lover says:
That is because "L" is both incapable and unwilling to read the terms of contract for Kindle books AND the previous postings on this thread.

DL

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:54:24 AM PST
My bad. Thanks! =)

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 7:58:10 AM PST
Just Peachy says:
Maybe "L" stands for Litella.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2012 8:00:56 AM PST
J. Gatie says:
Oh, that's very different....

Nevermind.

Thank you, Cheddar Cheese.

What's all this talk about conserving our natural racehorses?
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Kindle forum
Participants:  25
Total posts:  58
Initial post:  Aug 30, 2011
Latest post:  Dec 20, 2012

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 3 customers

Search Customer Discussions