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The Count of Monte Cristo - A Swashbuckling, Adventurous Reading Group


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In reply to an earlier post on Jul 1, 2012 8:37:05 PM PDT
I'd comment on just how improbable Dantes' means of escape seems... however, I have a vague memory of reading somewhere that this was based on some sort of actual incident Dumas knew of? Anyone know the background of that?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 2, 2012 4:39:11 AM PDT
Denise says:
I didn't find it implausible that they would dispose of dead prisoners this way when they are situated on a big rock in the sea.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 2, 2012 4:40:01 AM PDT
Denise says:
Personally, I think this is exactly the kind of context that contributes to our understanding of the book. I appreciate the tidbits each person looks up and throws in. Thanks.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 2, 2012 5:09:56 AM PDT
KathyC says:
It was based on something Dumas read written by a policeman, but the man on whom Dantes is based didn't escape from prison. He was under house arrest and made to be a servant for a rich cleric. When the cleric died, he left his fortune to the man, who then used it to get revenge on those who framed him. I guess this is one of the earliest "based on a true story" stories.

Posted on Jul 2, 2012 7:07:35 AM PDT
Denise says:
A reminder that this week's reading includes chapters 22-31. TODAY'S READING would be CHAPTER 26: The Pont du Gard Inn

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 2, 2012 7:45:34 AM PDT
Arual says:
Chapter 26 is a particularly important chapter to pay attention to.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 2, 2012 8:10:43 AM PDT
Montana Mo says:
April,
Thank you for sharing your research on Caesar Borgia. When reading this passage, I wondered if this was true history!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 2, 2012 8:31:14 AM PDT
Denise says:
can we say "fishing expedition"?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 2, 2012 12:35:54 PM PDT
Arual says:
Yeah. Or as I would call it, "gathering the facts."

Posted on Jul 2, 2012 5:36:47 PM PDT
Montana Mo says:
bump

Posted on Jul 2, 2012 10:16:30 PM PDT
*gentle bump*

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 3, 2012 3:27:18 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 3, 2012 7:12:13 AM PDT
Denise says:
*ahem! thinks our fearless leader should say more...*

so, discussers, your DAILY dose of READING (if not miles ahead or behind right now) is CHAPTER 27: The Story

eta: and we continue to discuss everything up to Dante's being picked up by the ship...

Posted on Jul 3, 2012 4:25:05 AM PDT
Arual says:
At the end of Chapter 21 is this: "Then his [Dantes'] eyes lighted up with hatred as he thought of the three men who had caused him so long and wretched a captivity. He renewed against Danglars, Fernand, and Villefort the oath of implacable vengeance he had made in his dungeon."

Why didn't Edmond include Caderousse in his list? Did he not know of Caderousse's part in the nasty business? Or did he think Caderousse wasn't as bad as the others?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 3, 2012 5:55:43 AM PDT
Denise says:
I didn't catch that. Good question.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 3, 2012 7:26:11 AM PDT
I don't know, but I don't think Caderousse was as bad as the others,...but how would Dantes know that since he was not there, so yes, good question.

Posted on Jul 3, 2012 7:43:01 AM PDT
MystyVamp says:
Maybe since Caderousse was his downstairs neighbor he (sort of) knew him and hadn't seen anything that (should) cause ill will. Ferdinand he knew was interested in his girl, Villefort sentenced him knowing he was innocent and Danglers he knew there was some animosity due to his being promoted ahead of him. Possibly he thought Canderousse was a (fairly) innocent bystander brought in by acquaintance, not by intent to do ill.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 3, 2012 7:47:15 AM PDT
 nospin  says:
That is a good point. He knew Caderousse and perhaps he could be easily intluenced to go along with someone's plan but was not evil at the core. Edmond held the conspirators responsible.

Posted on Jul 3, 2012 12:41:26 PM PDT
Montana Mo says:
bump

Posted on Jul 3, 2012 1:03:02 PM PDT
I am keeping quiet because I have to re-read so as not to say too much on the topic of Caderousse until we are supposed to discuss him.

I actually found myself disliking Dantes a bit when he had the "flames of revenge burning in his breast" or something to that effect, which surprised me. That I was ambivalent, I mean - he was so badly treated and had his life destroyed, but somehow Dumas doesn't bring righteous anger across in a way that makes sense to me. I am not saying I feel sympathy for the bad guys, only that I find Dumas' portrayal of Dantes flawed in a way.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 3, 2012 1:07:27 PM PDT
I feel the same way. Dantes certainly does not have what would be considered a christian attitude. I think maybe there is a difference in modern culture as opposed to the culture at the time where an attitude such as this might have been considered quite justified.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 3, 2012 1:16:40 PM PDT
I guess he is justified, but his methods are - wow. Then again, is there any way to really translate the miscarriage of justice he was the victim of, so that we can consider a "justified" plan of action? I have been trying to construct a "case" in my head, but I just can't get anything together...

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 3, 2012 1:18:12 PM PDT
It depends what code of ethics you are using. From a christian ethic, I don't believe so.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 3, 2012 1:20:17 PM PDT
Which is very interesting in itself - Dumas had a pretty solid Christian background, but there is no sign in the book of "vengeance is mine, sayeth the Lord"? At least as far as I have read, and from what I remember?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 3, 2012 1:22:23 PM PDT
I agree, but I don't want to start discussing things that are beyond the reading schedule. :-(

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 3, 2012 1:33:17 PM PDT
True, back to re-reading...
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Discussion in:  Kindle forum
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Initial post:  Jun 12, 2012
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