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Block accidental purchases or purchases by children!


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Showing 51-75 of 408 posts in this discussion
Posted on Jan 2, 2012 12:22:55 AM PST
zanara says:
From Amazon's site
Are Children Allowed to Use Amazon.com?
Amazon.com does not sell products for purchase by children. We sell children's products for purchase by adults. If you are under 18, you may use Amazon.com only with the involvement of a parent or guardian.
Whether you like it or not these are Amazon's own rules that you agreed to when you opened your account.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 12:38:17 AM PST
The first thing I'd think to do if I had my Kindle stolen would be to deregister my account.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 12:58:48 AM PST
C. Scilley says:
Amazon has many protections in place. If a person orders something, (even you) and wants it sent to a different address than the one you set up, they require that you input the credit card, the 3 digit code, and the zip code of the card. So somebody could not steal your Fire and order a bunch of stuff from it. Now if you have a password set up on it and also a password set up on the wifi on it, no one can get to your stuff on it. If you use the wifi password before the kids can use it, and make sure you shut the wifi off, they will not be able to browse on the internet or buy anything. If you don't want them to see your adult books, you can set up another account just for them. You will still need a credit card on the account, but you still can turn off the wifi when they are using it or until you can supervise them. I let my grandchildren use my Kindle Fire to play games, and I use Kid's Place. I also turn off the wifi on the Fire, and I also have the ability to buy in game stuff turned off. I also have a password set for in game buying as a extra precaution. They also play on the Fire in the living room with me there. So you see, the Fire is fun for kids as long as they have supervision.
Carolyn

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 1:14:55 AM PST
Les Bell says:
I suspect the requirement for a credit card (as opposed to GC's) is because of the growth of services, i.e. apps which may require on-going subscription-type payment or per-use payment for database updates, data access, etc.

And, of course, Amazon would argue that one-click buying is even *more* convenient for users of devices with constrained user interfaces - like smartphones, tablets, and yes, even Kindles. ;)

Posted on Jan 2, 2012 1:18:02 AM PST
Jo MW says:
If you go to the Your Account link (at the top of every amazon page), then sign in and go to 1-Click Settings, you can turn off 1-click just for your Kindle Fire. What more is needed?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 2:16:29 AM PST
"It's seems pretty embarrassing that you let the Fire out the gate as your what 5th or 6th version of a mobile device with this glaring security hole, where other Kindles can just use store credit only."

A simple way around this was suggested in another thread. Get one of those pre-paid credit cards, use it for gas or groceries or something until there is only a buck or two left, then put it on the account that has the Fire registered to it. That way you can go on using gift cards for purchases, but have a useless CC number attached to the account to meet the app purchasing requirement.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 2:30:43 AM PST
E. Dumea says:
hi, as far as i understood, "parental controls" are ONLY for blocking purchasing from WHITIN an application, so it's of no use here.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 2:35:49 AM PST
@E. Dumea: Have you checked out Kids Placein the apps store?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 2:42:10 AM PST
KessaJo says:
OK. Why are you telling people on the Internet this?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 2:44:41 AM PST
KessaJo says:
No, don't try Kid's Place, just return your KF like you said.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 2:53:37 AM PST
Les Bell says:
FWIW, Jim, this kind of problem falls within my professional sphere, and prompted by discussion on another thread, I've written up what I think Amazon ought to be doing to meet the needs of institutional purchasers (where the $$$ are) as well as the needs of families for "parental controls". The blog article is at:

http://securitasdato.blogspot.com/

Posted on Jan 2, 2012 5:18:46 AM PST
Send it back immediately. No time to waste. Extortion--I'll return my Kindle if you don't do what I say--is thuggish.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:10:21 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 2, 2012 6:11:13 AM PST
This is precisely why mine is password protected. If it is stolen, it is useless to anyone who does not possess my brain. Thief problem solved.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:24:03 AM PST
Just Peachy says:
I think this line is throwing a lot of people:
"Be sure Wi-Fi is Off before giving the device to your child."

/sarcasm

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:27:38 AM PST
Just Peachy says:
Returning the device and taking it away from the child do fall into "constructive advice" category.

People suggesting that the device be returned are not idiots. The Fire is not suited for the person's life then it should be returned. If they were not aware of how the device works there is a good chance they are not aware they can return it for a full refund within 30 days.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:30:06 AM PST
G. Cobos Password protect your Fire or other Kindles. Someone can do the same thing on a regular Kindle, all have access to Amazon's Store.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:30:52 AM PST
Just Peachy says:
I don't know what company you have as a cell phone carrier but the one I deal with (and used to work for) will not make you pay for charges from having your account cloned.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:32:38 AM PST
I disabled one-click for my Fire, but I was still able to rent a movie with one click. Well, two clicks, actually. No password required.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:33:54 AM PST
Just Peachy says:
Now you can turn off the wifi and require a password to turn it back on. That's assuming you aren't handing the Fire to a child to watch streaming videos.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:39:40 AM PST
Queen that will work as long as it's not one of two most common passwords; 123456 ... and abcdefg ... My Fire and my 3rd Gen Kindle is password protected

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 7:54:34 AM PST
Logician says:
- To Amazon: This is basic mobile security 101... fix this and fix it fast! Google spent a lot of time and $$$ to put quality security into Android - and you broke it. It's seems pretty embarrassing that you let the Fire out the gate as your what 5th or 6th version of a mobile device with this glaring security hole, where other Kindles can just use store credit only.

Yo Smart Guy, have you read the freaking manual (or even this entire thread)? Allow me to re-post what the manual says since you apparently can't be bothered.

Restrictions: To enable Restrictions by tapping On and entering a password. This
password is required to make any changes to settings within the Restrictions menu.
Enabling Password Protected Wi-Fi turns off Wi-Fi on your device and will require
your password to reactivate. Parents may use this feature to prevent children from
purchasing content without their permission or from browsing any inappropriate
online content. Be sure Wi-Fi is Off before giving the device to your child. You will
see a Key icon to the right of the Quick Settings icon whenever Password Protected
Wi-Fi is enabled and Wi-Fi is off.

Well, what do you know? Look at that!!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 8:14:34 AM PST
Thank you, Anna, this is very helpful. I like talking to you, too.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 8:17:53 AM PST
KessaJo says:
You mean all these parental control threads have been for nothing, because Amazon already has it taken care of? Wow! I am shocked that the parents don't know this already!

Thanks Logician! Kessa

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 8:23:07 AM PST
Logician says:
It's to be expected really. Just like they want Amazon to instill responsibility, they want someone else to read the manual.

Posted on Jan 2, 2012 8:28:31 AM PST
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Discussion in:  Kindle forum
Participants:  70
Total posts:  408
Initial post:  Jan 1, 2012
Latest post:  Feb 16, 2013

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