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Share only once... LAME


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Posted on Aug 7, 2011 7:23:43 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 7, 2011 7:39:56 PM PDT
Marek says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 7, 2011 7:34:37 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 7, 2011 7:37:09 PM PDT
King Al says:
Agency Model publishers withdrew their books from the nook lending program as soon as Amazon announced their program, so they clearly would not agree to more user friendly terms

ETA some publishers have withdrawn from the Kindle lending as well

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 7, 2011 7:45:07 PM PDT
Marek says:
It is true that the number of lendable ebooks has been reduced on nook in June 2011 while lending was enabled on kindle around December 2010. Reduction might have been related to kindle, but saying that "publishers withdrew their books from the nook lending program..." is simply not true.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 7, 2011 7:50:09 PM PDT
King Al says:
Yes it is. One of the knowledgeable people in the nook forums (and confirmed by personal experiences of nook forum users) reported that the number of nook lendable titles (mainly agency model) had a huge decrease around the time the Kindle program went into effect.

It could be a coincidence, but I doubt it.

Posted on Aug 7, 2011 8:01:54 PM PDT
Marek says:
So how is true if you originally said that simply "publishers withdrew" and now you're saying "some publishers". The facts here are nook offered lending since inception in Oct 2009, kindle started offering exact same service late Dec 2010, reduction (but not elimination) in number of ebooks happened halfe year later on both in June 2011. I don't have the exact numbers but I would say it's a pretty good guess that the number of lendable agency ebooks today is in thousands. Simple google searches show reputable sources that confirm that.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 7, 2011 8:32:46 PM PDT
King Al says:
Good point. The Agency Model publishers APPARENTLY withdrew around January 2011. Other publishers may still be in the program.

Posted on Aug 7, 2011 9:09:31 PM PDT
Marek says:
Random House, Penguin, Hachette, HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster withdrew in the beginning of January. Macmillan withrew in April. My June mention was off.

Back on topic: Clue as far as who held back lending on kindle:
http://www.businessinsider.com/jeff-bezos-the-nooks-book-lending-feature-is-a-joke-2009-12

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 7, 2011 9:36:30 PM PDT
King Al says:
Thanks for digging that up. Given Amazon's failure with the Agency Model, I'm not sure if they would have gotten better lending terms even if Bezos supported it.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 7, 2011 9:53:00 PM PDT
If I had a lot of friends that I wanted to gift reading material to, I'd check out the gifting thru amazon or buying the books thru something like paperbackswap. Even tho I am a member I am not exactly sure how paperbackswap works. Something about you only pay for mailing-but there are other rules

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 7, 2011 10:06:10 PM PDT
RayGun

I love technology, but find there is always a limitation-just one more thing I wish it would do. The only thing worse is buying more items that duplicate some of the technology you already have.

If it makes you feel better to know that if you find a really great read it isn't that you pass the physical item to your friends. I know I'd be happy to simply have the title and author passed on to me. There are just too many books out there to have to shift thru all of them.

I know this isn't the answer you are looking for

Posted on Aug 7, 2011 10:35:48 PM PDT
I can totally understand people loving the lend feature. First thing I thought of when I noticed it was that it was a great hook to get people to buy a kindle or to continue purchasing from the publishers thru kindle. I always give merit to great marketing

So, now some people, after being teased with that feature would like it to do more-totally understandable (not to me, I have never had the need to use it, but I do understand some people would love it)

What isn't understandable is that when people mention they would like that feature expanded (and let's guess why they would want it expanded) they are jumped on. They are personally attacked. Then when they are answered back they are reported????????????????

I have always had a lot of success when I have asked a question on one of these boards...

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2011 4:43:13 AM PDT
It can be hard to show true meaning in text, as you know! Plus I was also trying to be supportive of the OP.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2011 9:10:16 AM PDT
Zimdle says:
Actually, Simon & Schuster and Macmillan don't allow lending of their books through libraries at all (the last I heard, anyway) and HarperCollins limits each copy of an ebook to only being lent 26 times (one year of lending with 2-week lending period).

I wouldn't call that unlimited lending.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2011 9:41:19 AM PDT
Marek says:
Fine, but still saying that the publishers set the limit of 1 time 14 day lending is not true if the HarperCollins allows different lending terms via overdrive. Clearly 1 time 14 day lending was set by amazon to compete with nook. Publishers only have the option of either agreeing with it or not allowing it.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2011 9:44:37 AM PDT
What you are talking about, 1 time, 14 days, refers to individuals lending books to each other. It has nothing to do with library lending and overdrive.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2011 9:49:26 AM PDT
Zimdle says:
What would be the publishers' incentive to allow more lending than what is available on Nook?

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2011 10:03:22 AM PDT
flipoid says:
I don't think I've ever read a post that reflects more misinformation than the lending one by Marek. Marek, the publishers DO set the lending limit: when the Nook first announced it, they stated that if a publisher allowed it, a book could be lent *by an individual* to someone for one time only, for 14 days. The publishers determined the terms of that type of lending.

Library lending is a completely different thing. Libraries buy "copies" (licenses) of the ebooks, just as they buy physical copies of books for library patrons to borrow. The libraries (not the publishers) determine their lending period--some offer only 7, 14, or 21 days; some let the borrower determine if he/she wants the book for any one of those three time periods (one library I use lets me select if I want a book for 7, 14, or 21 days; the other library has *only* a 14-day borrowing period).

There are also some publishers, who have been mentioned above, who don't allow their books to be lent between Nook or Amazon owners, and also some publishers who don't let libraries even purchase e-books for loan to library patrons (Macmillan and Simon & Schuster).

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2011 10:06:55 AM PDT
Marek says:
True, just wanted to voice my opinion that 1 time 14 days loan is set by amazon and b&n not by publishers, which is in response to second post of the thread stating "The publishers set the restrictions not Amazon.". Publishers only have the option to opt in or out under those terms.

Posted on Aug 8, 2011 10:10:37 AM PDT
"that 1 time 14 days loan is set by amazon and b&n not by publishers" is simply wrong. Just because you choose to believe it does not make it true.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2011 10:17:29 AM PDT
Marek says:
Which part is the misinformation precisely? If a publisher wanted to allow 5 time 7 days max limit of lending of their ebook sold via amazon.com could they do that?

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2011 10:18:08 AM PDT
yes.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2011 10:20:33 AM PDT
Marek says:
Show me 1 ebook in entire lendable inventory of amazon or b&n that allows different terms than 1 time for 2 weeks. Or anything at all that supports your claim.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2011 10:21:21 AM PDT
Show me evidence that any publisher WANTS to do that.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2011 10:23:00 AM PDT
sabst79 says:
Show me any evidence to support your claim that its B&N and Amazon setting the lending policy.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 8, 2011 10:24:47 AM PDT
Marek says:
Now here's the root of our differences: I talk facts (what the lending periods ARE and who allows). You want to talk speculations (what the lending periods COULD or COULDN'T or SHOULD or SHOULDN'T be).
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Kindle forum
Participants:  50
Total posts:  314
Initial post:  Aug 5, 2011
Latest post:  Nov 13, 2012

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