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Block accidental purchases or purchases by children!


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Showing 151-175 of 408 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 4:10:40 PM PST
Happy New Year, Anna! I like your new name. But I am sensing a theme running through a couple of your personas: vixen, minx... Coincidence? I think not!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 4:46:31 PM PST
flipoid says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 5:17:20 PM PST
Chris Miller says:
Just because some things are being rated such as TV and movies doesn't mean everything should be. Nothing should be rated all ratings do is restrict content.

Example: Stephen King is about to start writing a new novel. His publisher wants the book avaliable to as many people as possible. As such Stephen King now has to write his new novel in basically the same way a movie director has to edit a great R rated action movie into a mediocre PG-13 movie.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 5:18:26 PM PST
Right. Exactly.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 5:52:54 PM PST
Yes, accidentally. That's the point. It's exceedingly easy to accidentally hit the Buy button, especially given the Fire's temperamental touch screen. It has nothing to do with maturity. And your flippant response doesn't take into account any of the other scenarios I mentioned, such as setting the Kindle down to run to the bathroom in the presence of friends who might also accidentally (or purposely) hit the Buy button.

Yes, I know, that's "my bad" as a parent; I should've been there to deactivate WiFi while he took a tinkle.

Sheesh. Are you people serious?

The obvious, easiest solution is to password protect the Buy function. The fact that so few people admit that is really quite amazing.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 5:54:26 PM PST
You know that it isn't passworded on your computer right?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 5:57:38 PM PST
Karen Walker says:
Hasn't anyone seen the latest KF Tv commercials? I just watched a little girl on Tv playing in a sheet tent in her room with her Kindle Fire in hand. Amazon is directly marketing to children. No ifs, ands, or buts adout it.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 5:58:22 PM PST
Anne Shirley says:
"Sheesh. Are you people serious?"

One might ask you the same question. If you're seriously using "setting the Kindle down to run to the bathroom in the presence of friends who might also accidentally (or purposely) hit the Buy button" as a rationale for password protection, you might have bigger problems than password protection of a Kindle.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:04:25 PM PST
Producers of products have been marketing to children ever since there have been children. That's why children have parents: To decide what is really appropriate for their children.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:06:31 PM PST
That's nice. But I don't want my nine-year-old son to buy stuff. I just want him to be able to download and use the free apps, and do an occasional Google. Disabling WiFi prevents him from accessing even the free apps or the internet. Disabling one-click only prevents "in-app" purchases. The Kids Place app doesn't allow for password protected buying unless you shut off the web completely or limit the apps yourself.

Creating an entirely new Amazon account with gift cards or credit cards, just so a nine-year-old can use free apps, is overkill; especially when Amazon could simply include a password protected Buy option.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:08:35 PM PST
Logician says:
How about you let him download the free apps and what-not when you're around and when you're not, you lock it. Problem solved, yes?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:10:39 PM PST
Jazzy_Jeff says:
Of course it isn't. That would mean spending time with the child instead of letting the Fire baby sit. Silly!!!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:11:31 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 2, 2012 6:12:13 PM PST
Chris Miller says:
How would that allow your son to buy only free apps? If you password protect buying apps then it would be for all apps, not just the paid ones.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:11:54 PM PST
You really waste a lot of energy on things you can't change. How does that help you? Take your complaints to Amazon and then do the best you can with the Fire. Nothing else is going to get you what you want.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:19:58 PM PST
Lock what? WiFi? I don't want to cut off his WiFi. I have no problem with him having internet access. I can block all the sites I want through my router. What I don't want is any Tom, Dick or Harry being able to order things with one press of a button. Or his four-year-old brother.

Simple solution: password protect the Buy process.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:22:43 PM PST
Logician says:
So you've taught him not to access illicit material over the web, but you can't teach him not to buy an app?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:23:01 PM PST
How about you demand that as an OPTION? So I don't have to bother with it.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:23:03 PM PST
Jazzy,
Doesn't your butt hurt from riding that high horse all day?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:25:21 PM PST
Doesn't really matter how high the horse is. It's all about the saddle.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:25:44 PM PST
How do you block sites through your router?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:26:43 PM PST
Yep. An option. Seems a simple thing to ask, doesn't it?

Other table/reader makers have figured this out. The Nook, for example.

Amazon will eventually come around when they find how much this option means to actual parents (rather than those just pretending to be).

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:27:31 PM PST
Logician says:
It can be done. A better question would be how does his router block the fire when it's on a public Wi-Fi or at his son's friend's house.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:28:08 PM PST
Logician says:
- Amazon will eventually come around

Okay, then you can stop your whining, yes?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:32:48 PM PST
Anne Shirley says:
But it's not about what you want, sadly for you. No matter how many times you repeat your "demands,", Amazon could care less about those individual, entitled demands for what you want. Virtually stomping your feet in a customer discussion forum, along with your "reasons" is only making you look foolish. It's sure not accomplishing anything else for you.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 6:33:16 PM PST
Simpler solution: don't give a child something designed primarily for adults to use to buy things.
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Discussion in:  Kindle forum
Participants:  70
Total posts:  408
Initial post:  Jan 1, 2012
Latest post:  Feb 16, 2013

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