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Kids resetting Kindle to override parental controls


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Initial post: Jul 6, 2014 4:07:37 PM PDT
J.Berry says:
Is there a way to keep a Kindle Fire from allowing a factory reset if the password is forgotten? My kids have learned to enter a bad password into Kindle FreeTime enough times to be given the option to factory reset their Kindles. Then they can make a fake account and do everything I had blocked.

It would also seem pointless if the Kindle was stolen, a thief can enter the password wrong, then Factory Reset the Kindle and it's theirs now.

Wouldn't it be better if the person had to log in to their Amazon account to override the password features?

Posted on Jul 6, 2014 4:19:54 PM PDT
well, if stolen you would/could call amazon and they would block the kindle from being registered.

With your kids.... well, if they cant follow your rules.... what you do is up to you. In my home they wouldn't have the devices or access to the wifi ... or both!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 6, 2014 5:02:12 PM PDT
It'd be the device that gets confiscated in my house, because blocking the wifi at home doesn't stop them using it at friends' places and free hotspots.

J.Berry, you do realise you can do exactly the same thing to break their "fake account" and get their kindles back to your preferences, don't you?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 6, 2014 5:12:00 PM PDT
Bufo Calvin says:
It doesn't seem pointless to me.

When a device is stolen, the physical device is only a part of the loss (and some would argue, a small part). You could have important personal information on it (for example, you might have stored financial data on it), and you certainly don't want them accessing your account.

When a device is factory reset, it is wiped clean (except for the Kindle operating system and any updates to it) and it is no longer registered to your account.

As Monikat mentioned, if you report your Kindle stolen to Amazon, it won't be able to be registered (by someone else): so although the device might be "theirs", they can't use it in the Amazon system.

When your children create the "fake accounts", they don't have access to what was on your account. The act of creating those fake accounts could be a serious problem: it certainly puts them in violation of Amazon's Terms of Service

http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html/ref=help_search_4-7?ie=UTF8&nodeId=508088&qid=1404691432&sr=4-7

and could have consequences.

You may want to make your suggestion to Amazon at

kindle-feedback@amazon.com

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 6, 2014 6:12:19 PM PDT
A. Dietz says:
If your kids can't follow the rules you set about using the device, take it away from them until they are mature enough to use it responsibly. The very best parental control is YOU, not something built into the device.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 6:29:37 AM PDT
Wouldn't it be better if you tell them that if they do it again, they will lose the device for one week, and if they do it again, take the KF away from them.

Secondly, if they make a fake account, they will have access to nothing. How old are these little darlings anyhow?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 7:13:44 AM PDT
Jazzy_Jeff says:
The password is only used to protect your content. All computers can be reset if needed. It wouldn't make sense otherwise. As for you not being able to discipline your children well that is another topic....

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 7:23:24 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 7, 2014 7:26:29 AM PDT
"Wouldn't it be better if the person had to log in to their Amazon account to override the password features?"

It is set up like that for legit owners who forget their passwords. If you had to log in to your Amazon account first --with your password-- but you forgot your password and there was no work-around, you'd be up the creek.

Once upon a time, I sneered at the 'sillys' who'd forget their passwords. These days with various sites and applications (work and home) requiring passwords of different prescribed lengths (some with specific combos of letters, numbers, and characters) to be changed at different intervals and/or after that site was hacked by a 3rd party, and not to be similar to the prior passwords or a recognizable phrase or sequence ... and you are not supposed to write it down to jog your memory ... and the password safes themselves need passwords to open ...

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 7:25:57 AM PDT
This absolutely confounds me. A capital letter AND a number AND a character. [weeps]

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 7:28:35 AM PDT
Cassie Anne says:
Tell your children not to do that, and what the consequences will be if they do it again. Implement consequences as needed.

If your children are not able or willing to follow your rules, take the Fire away.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 7:46:02 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 7, 2014 7:47:04 AM PDT
Kessa says:
A capital letter AND a number AND a character. [weeps]
*****************
2WolvesEatingYou!

Sorry, I love coming up with passwords. LOL!

Edited for typo.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 7:50:09 AM PDT
Kessa says:
If your children are not able or willing to follow your rules, take the Fire away.
***************
But Cassie Anne, that's soooo hard to do. Why can't devices just whatever each person wants? I mean parenting should be done by electrical devices, right?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 8:06:47 AM PDT
It's fine/fun to come up with them, sure, but I can't *remember* them!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 8:13:29 AM PDT
Just Peachy says:
Many will advise that no part of the password should be a real word.

Posted on Jul 7, 2014 8:31:00 AM PDT
M. Cairo says:
I agree there should be a different way to reset it. My 4yr old resets it accidentally all the time!! When he is in Freetime he should not have that ability. It's the reason I pay for the secure Freetime!!

Posted on Jul 7, 2014 8:43:30 AM PDT
pjf says:
I agree with the poster who said after they do a factory reset and attach the kindle to a new fake account, the device should have nothing on it for them to access. In this fake account, are they then buying free game apps and playing games? Or are they using it to access web sites of which you don't approve? Two different problems. Kindle FreeTime I believe was designed for little kids' inadvertent keystrokes, not intelligent getting around. Seems like your kids must be older if they are savvy enough to create a new Amazon account and register the device to it. I don't know that Amazon has anything to circumvent that. You can check Manage your Content and Devices to see if your device has been factory reset and deregistered from your account. Maybe Amazon CS has something that will notify your email address if a device is deregistered? Or a security program more designed for teens? Or it may be that it has to come down to you taking the devices away if they can't respect the limits you set for them.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 9:02:51 AM PDT
Kessa says:
When I come up with a password for myself, I either use the code my brother & used when we were kids to talk with each other or I make up a Cryptogram for it.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 9:05:10 AM PDT
I agree--if we're into the realm of "intelligent getting-around" the security of FreeTime, then it's time to choose a different method of security.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 9:06:49 AM PDT
Kessa says:
LOL! Yeah, that was my problem - now I use an index card to put the info on.

I use what I came up with on the card, but turn it into a Cryptogram or other code as the actual password.

Now I just have to remember whether i used the code my brother & I came up with or if I used a cryptogram.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 9:11:55 AM PDT
CatChat says:
I use different combo's of family names, but with some of the names I replace the number from the phone pad (i.e. ABC=1, DEF=2, ect).
so if I choose something like johnmike it would be john6453

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 9:13:11 AM PDT
Kessa says:
That sounds like a good way to do it. =)

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 9:13:53 AM PDT
Geez.
You and hubby.
I can never remember his passwords - he makes them too complicated.
I either need 2 different 'code' references that he made up to decipher it, or it's some off the wall long acronym he pulled out of thin air.

It's easy, he says.
Yeah, if I was inside your head maybe.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 9:46:10 AM PDT
Kessa says:
LOL! I'm sorry, that's just too funny. =)

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 10:02:33 AM PDT
My daughter JUST taught me that! It had never occurred to me, before. But she told me one of her passwords (I know, right? What's the point if you tell people?), and it was "Word(shift)0811" or "Word)*!!" but it was a number she could remember.

This is a great idea!

When I worked retail, and they made us change our time clock code every 30 days, I used an acrostic with the month number. Like the musical scale "Every Good Boy Does Fine", I'd do EGBDF01, then EGBDF02, etc... I just had to change my acrostic once a year.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 7, 2014 10:03:58 AM PDT
I can tell when I've overwhelmed people by the owl-gaze they give me. I often say, "Oh. I'm sorry. I forget that you don't know what it's like in here."
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Kindle forum
Participants:  24
Total posts:  62
Initial post:  Jul 6, 2014
Latest post:  Jul 8, 2014

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