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hate purchased book


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Showing 1-25 of 35 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jun 23, 2013 1:15:14 PM PDT
karen says:
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Posted on Jun 23, 2013 1:16:45 PM PDT
GnomeEd says:
You have 7 days to return a book

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 23, 2013 1:16:48 PM PDT
Dittie says:
Well, bless your little ole heart, honey.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 23, 2013 1:22:24 PM PDT
Dog Lover says:
And this is of interest to us why?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 23, 2013 1:25:34 PM PDT
The Artist says:
Shoulda downloaded a sample first.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 23, 2013 1:35:35 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 23, 2013 1:36:07 PM PDT
Meya says:
Karen, Amazon allows for Kindle books to be returned for refund within the first 7 days after purchase. However, it should be noted that they can and will remove that option from accounts that abuse it.

Go to Manage Your Kindle, and to the right of the book, in the Actions drop down menu, you'll see Return for Refund.

In the future, download a sample, which is free, and read it before buying books you aren't sure about. The use of the Return option should be limited to books with formatting issues and other major problems. You shouldn't just return a book because you "don't like it." That isn't the purpose for the feature.

Posted on Jun 23, 2013 10:08:56 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 24, 2013 5:50:42 AM PDT
bookcrazy says:
There have been several occasions that after having read the sample, I bought the book only to return it because I did not " like" it. There are the rare times that a sample is not truly representative of the content in the book. Sometimes the sample was just too darn short and I took a chance.

I have no problem returning a book I just do not "like" but having said that, I do not abuse the policy and this happens very rarely.

My definition of "like" may be different than another's definition: for example, a sample might not be long enough to contain the preachy religious undertones. If I get hoodwinked, I will return this type of book for content.

I get that there is a huge audience for Chirstian fiction but it is just not my cup of tea.

Being able to do so validates Amazon's exceptional customer service and is what helps make the company stand ahead of the pack.

edited to change "religious" fiction to "Christian" fiction.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 6:50:04 AM PDT
FRW says:
I generally do not return purchased books, since sometimes you just chose poorly. However, I have also vowed to return books with unidentified Christian themes in the future. Previously, I just posted a review to help people make a more informed decision than I had the opportunity to make. Not my cup of tea, either.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 6:51:21 AM PDT
Just Peachy says:
Do you do that with paperbooks?
Do you do that with items you buy at the grocery store and then decide you just really don't like the taste of it?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 6:54:43 AM PDT
I have returned some clunkers too and am glad that Amazon allows you to return books. Sometimes the sample is quite good (and depending only 5-10 pages long) and you really can't tell how the book will turn out until you get farther into the novel.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 6:56:15 AM PDT
Cassie Anne says:
I've been burned a few times on CF, too, but I've never returned a book for that reason, even if it wasn't clearly marked. It just seems wrong to me - since I wouldn't return a paperbook for the same reason. YMMV, of course.

I've learned to read the 1 and 2 star reviews to see if anyone has mentioned religious themes.

Posted on Jun 24, 2013 6:56:19 AM PDT
The only time I returned an e-book was when I bought a single title, then realized I had a bundle with that title already in it.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 6:59:06 AM PDT
Anne Shirley says:
Oopsie. Too bad. Your choice, though. Better luck next time.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 6:59:27 AM PDT
That is one thing that is baffling me lately. There are a lot of free books that should be in the Christian fiction genre. I do read the reviews and a few of the novels never mention that in the reviews.

I also want to add there is nothing wrong with Christian fiction or romance I have read a few Amish in love novels (they tickle me) but I do like it when the novel is in the right genre. I just wonder if the author puts it in just the romance category hoping to catch more readers that way.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 6:59:28 AM PDT
Cassie Anne says:
I've returned a couple over the last three years - one or two I already owned (ASIN changed) and one or two "I didn't mean to buy that book at all" fat-finger purchases.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 7:01:17 AM PDT
Cassie Anne says:
>>> just wonder if the author puts it in just the romance category hoping to catch more readers that way.

That's entirely possible. And if the book is newly released, it may not yet have had time to accrue reviews from a variety of readers.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 7:03:19 AM PDT
I returned 3 with the same ASIN number change issue. I was so happy to see (what I thought were 3 more) titles in a series I'm hoping will all be Kindled; then I realized I already had those 3. The books are about Sister Joan, all the titles are 3 words, and the first 2 are Vow of. So you have Vow of Silence, Vow of Poverty, etc. It makes keeping track of which is which very tricky..........

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 7:11:05 AM PDT
Norwenna says:
I have returned a few paper books to a brick-and-mortar B&N store because I had inadvertently purchased a book that I already owned. I don't really think that that's a moral issue, because they can still sell it to someone else. I didn't get any stains on the books, so they're no dirtier than the books on the shelves which potential customers have picked up and perused.
I didn't do it often, because then the B&N employees might have been justified in thinking that I was using them as a lending library.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 7:13:29 AM PDT
Just Peachy says:
I have returned paper books that I got as a gift and already owned a copy. But if I picked out a book, started reading it and hated it, I just chalk it up to experience and move on.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 7:15:03 AM PDT
My local Library usually benefited from those types of purchases.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 7:23:06 AM PDT
Just Peachy says:
Yep -- library, Goodwill, a friend or book swapping website.

I bought a copy of Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. Read a couple of chapters and found out more about the content. Decided I didn't want to read it. It never dawned on me to return it to the store. Used the book swapping site to get rid of it.

Posted on Jun 24, 2013 7:24:34 AM PDT
Just Peachy says:
I do remember being in Books-a-million a few years ago and hearing the sales clerk tell someone about a computer book "take it home, find out what you need and then just bring it back for a refund...it's okay, people do it all the time". Freaked me out. I don't want to pay full price for a book that is actually used.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 7:26:42 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 24, 2013 7:34:35 AM PDT
Cassie Anne says:
I'm not sure I've ever returned books like those. I don't have specific recollections of ever returning any books, but I can't say for certain I've never returned a book, either.

Not sure why, but returning books doesn't sit well with me. There's no logical reason for it, but returning a book (even an unread book) "feels" different to me than returning unworn shoes or clothing.

But again, that's my thought processes (of possibly dubious logic *grin*) for myself and only myself.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 7:28:54 AM PDT
FRW says:
And I think that some might see that as a minor difference leading to e-book returns. If you pick up a physical book that ends up not appealing to you, you can pass it on to someone who might appreciate it. With e-books, you are really only purchasing a limited right to that material and do not have the same options. I am not complaining, since that is how I buy all books (except some cookbooks) these days, but it is a difference.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2013 7:34:41 AM PDT
Norwenna says:
I know, my Catholic guilt won't allow that!
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Discussion in:  Kindle forum
Participants:  16
Total posts:  35
Initial post:  Jun 23, 2013
Latest post:  Jun 24, 2013

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