Customer Discussions > Literary Fiction forum

Three or more living authors you view as great


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 101-125 of 448 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2009 8:15:57 PM PDT
Amy Zhao says:
why would you read the second book in the border trilogy before the preceding novel

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2009 8:19:04 PM PDT
Amy Zhao says:
why would you read the second book in the border trilogy before the preceding novel

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 11, 2009 8:21:15 PM PDT
Amy Zhao says:
why would you read the second book in the border trilogy before the preceding novel

Posted on Jun 12, 2009 9:43:53 AM PDT
Ben Parker says:
E.L. Doctorow (Ragtime is essential)

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 12, 2009 7:10:41 PM PDT
Thank goodness for this thread. The majority of books people recommend in the Kindle store are vacuous. You won't feel empty after reading these:

Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao
Sandra Cisneros, Caramelo
Zadie Smith, White Teeth
John McGahern, All Will Be Well: A Memoir (recently deceased)

Posted on Jun 13, 2009 12:43:09 AM PDT
Susan E. Day says:
I have to agree with the person who wrote that some of the best writing these days isn't fiction and I'd add Taylor Branch to his list. However, since this is a fiction forum, I put Pat Conroy first, which is the only easy choice. After that, how do you decide between Joyce Carol Oates, Cormac McCarthy, Gore Vidal, Phillip Roth, Toni Morrison, et al. For me, it depends on my mood . . .

Posted on Jun 13, 2009 7:14:25 AM PDT
I was surprised no one mentioned Larry McMurtry. I've read all of Cormac McCarthy, all of Annie Dillard, all of Tom McGuane, all of David James Duncan, and these are my idea of fine authors, but the one book I remember as wishing it would never end was Lonesome Dove. That's storytelling at its very best. Pre-quels and sequels alike failed to measure up, but I was always proud, even so, to ride the river with Call and McCrae.

Posted on Jun 14, 2009 6:04:46 PM PDT
agree with many of the preceding suggestions, but must add Timothy Findley, especially the book The Wars which i read for my high school literature class but which has stayed with me ever since.

Posted on Jun 14, 2009 7:16:40 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 14, 2009 7:17:40 PM PDT
Harris says:
Tom Robbins
John Irving
Kevin Brockmeier
Nick Hornby

Posted on Jun 15, 2009 8:46:26 AM PDT
Don DeLillo
Martin Amis
Philip Roth
Joyce Carol Oates
Gore Vidal

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 15, 2009 10:27:10 AM PDT
C. Macli says:
Roth
Lethem (Stay away from You Don't Love Me Yet)
Simic

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 15, 2009 10:31:21 AM PDT
C. Macli says:
Wow. I had 1/3 of the same list but I whole-heartedly agree with Johnson. Jesus' Son is the greatest collection of short stories in the past fifty years. Check out Dead Boys by Richard Lange. I guarantee these stories would appeal to your taste.

Posted on Jun 16, 2009 1:46:05 PM PDT
cherryl says:
A. Manette Ansay (Vinegar Hill)
Melinda Haynes (Willem's Field)
Daniel Quinn (Ishmael)

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 16, 2009 4:16:48 PM PDT
nielsenmat says:
3 Great Living Authors:

John Barth "The Sot-Weed Factor"
Salman Rushdie "The Satanic Verses"
Don Delillo "Underworld"

Posted on Jun 17, 2009 6:17:45 PM PDT
K. Whitaker says:
What a great thread to read!!
Here are some current favorites:

Thomas McGuane
Richard Russo
Harry Crews
John Banville
Kem Nunn
Jonathan Carroll
Tom Robbins

to name only a few :-)

Posted on Jun 17, 2009 6:47:54 PM PDT
Louise Erdrich, Love Medicine, The Beet Queen, The Painted Drum
Amy Tan, The Kitchen God's Wife, any of them, really
Richard Adams, Watership Down

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2009 6:57:41 PM PDT
I agree. Larry McMurtry is a great writer. At the end of Lonesome Dove, and nearly all of his books, I was left wanting more.

Posted on Jun 18, 2009 3:55:21 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 22, 2009 3:03:44 PM PDT
Gene Wolfe - The Book of the New Sun is a masterwork, which, despite being Sci-fi, ranks among the best literary fiction.

Milorad Pavic - The Dictionary of the Kazars is an excellent example of non-linear, non-traditionally formatted story-telling.

Richard Adams - Watership Down is an exceptionally well-written book with multi-layered themes and more than a bit of socio-political nuance.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 19, 2009 9:30:55 AM PDT
Can't get on board with Adams, but love Tan and Erdrich. Love Medicine and The Joy Luck Club are extremely impressive first novels and everything that follows is wonderful as well...

Unrelated: I am going to have to add Khaleid Hosseini to the list. A Thousand Splendid Suns is the best book I have read in about five years. It is a perfect novel: disturbing, sincere, moving, cohesive, and full of pathos. I adore it (much better than The Kite Runner...which was good, but not great).

Posted on Jun 19, 2009 3:25:53 PM PDT
Neanderthal says:
John Nichols. Read the Milagro Beanfield War as a given, but also read the other two books in the New Mexico Trilogy. You will enjoy these books and others that he has written; both fiction and non-fiction.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 20, 2009 3:30:58 PM PDT
Totally agree. Alice Munro is great. Read any of her books and you won't be disappointed.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 21, 2009 8:04:03 AM PDT
W. Shinskie says:
you can't hold it against him that he's an oprah pick, come on, all that matters is that he's a great writer. He's the best american prose writer besides Hunter S. Thompson.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 21, 2009 9:18:01 PM PDT
I am with you on this W. Shinskie! I am finishing up a PhD in American literature and am surrounded daily by colleagues ("critics") who turn their noses up at "Oprah picks." Their loss. To date, I have read 23 Oprah book club choices, and only two were disappointing. Conversely, there are a few that make my best reads of all time list (She's Come Undone, Fall On Your Knees, I Know This Much is True, The Red Tent --to name a few). I can take or leave Oprah Winfrey, quite frankly, but regardless, she does not choose these books randomly...she has a team of well educated professionals in her midst. In my humble yet educated opinion, they clearly know what they are doing.
Serious readers should not care who does or does not endorse their book choices/interests.
A good book is a good book, and I am EVER SO THANKFUL that I discovered Wally Lamb and Ann Marie MacDonald through the Oprah book club list.
Readers need to stop acting so pretentious. The list, for the most part is genuinely good. Period.

Posted on Jun 22, 2009 9:35:26 AM PDT
N. Lor says:
Isabel Allende (Eva Luna, House of Spirits)
Toni Morrison (Paradise, Beloved)
Zadie Smith (White Teeth, On Beauty)
Haruki Murakami (Wind Up Bird Chronicle, Kafka on the Shore)
Salman Rushdie (Midnight's Children, The Ground Beneath Her Feet)
Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Love in the Time of Cholera, One Hundred Years of Solitude)
Ana Castillo (The Guardians)

Posted on Jun 22, 2009 10:22:41 AM PDT
P. Bradley says:
I agree about the Oprah book club; I, too, discovered Wally Lamb there. And several others. PBradley
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


Recent discussions in the Literary Fiction forum (219 discussions)


Active discussions in related forums  
   
 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Literary Fiction forum
Participants:  284
Total posts:  448
Initial post:  Nov 23, 2008
Latest post:  May 18, 2013

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 45 customers

Search Customer Discussions