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Customer Discussions > Literary Fiction forum

What is literary fiction?


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Showing 51-75 of 356 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Apr 27, 2009 8:44:39 AM PDT
Gail Graham says:
If what they are doing is illegal, then the obvious course of action is to file suit against them.
If it's simply immoral -- that's a different issue.
Just as there is a difference between profit and non-profit organizations, there is a difference between illegal and immoral.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 27, 2009 11:48:21 AM PDT
BuytheBook says:
"That's it's well written?" -- I THINK NOT!

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 27, 2009 1:36:43 PM PDT
Gail Graham says:
Sorry, but if it's not well written then it's not literary fiction. It may be lots of other things -- innovative, challenging, contemporary, trendy. But if it's not well written it is not literary fiction. The idea of literary fiction implies standards. Not twitters. Standards.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 27, 2009 2:40:41 PM PDT
BuytheBook says:
You have no standards. You still have not responded to the fact that you wrote "that's it's".

You're a twit -- or is that a twitter?

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2009 6:58:10 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 27, 2009 4:10:00 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2009 6:59:31 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 27, 2009 4:10:00 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2009 8:12:24 AM PDT
Gail Graham says:
You're right about the internet being unregulated.
I had a ghastly experience with "animal pornography" last year -- it was a posting on a website that purported to "assist authors" that described the torture and murder of a pet dog in sickeningly graphic detail. The Webmaster considered it "artistic" and posted a long message to ASPCA members who had protested, telling them that it was "futile" to complain. Apparently, just about anything goes.
I'm not sure that's a good thing, but I'm also not sure as to what can be done about it.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2009 1:33:01 PM PDT
BuytheBook says:
Okay, let's take it real slow now, since no one here can get this, and I don't have the option of bolding or highlighting.
"t h a T ' S i T ' S should not have an " 's " after that AND it. Thats its makes no sense. Especially when one is trying to make the point of writing standards in literary fiction. I find this far more offensive than my tone!!

Posted on Apr 28, 2009 1:50:15 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 27, 2009 4:10:00 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2009 2:10:50 PM PDT
Gail Graham says:
BuytheBook is referring to a typographical error in my post of March 31st. It's been my experience that when one responds to this sort of rudeness, it merely encourages further rudeness. What we were talking about is much more interesting.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2009 2:18:20 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 27, 2009 4:10:00 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2009 2:31:23 PM PDT
Gail Graham says:
Yes, it's coming. It has to come.
But persistent complaining is time-consuming and not always productive. Individual complaints can be ignored, especially when there are no rules in place. It's too easy for the bureaucrat in charge to say, Sorry, but there's nothing I can do.
Organizations usually do a better job of lobbying for change than individuals. Do you know of any organizations that are currently lobbying to curb Internet abuses?

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2009 4:36:21 PM PDT
BuytheBook says:
Toni, in both of your posts to me, you've admitted that you don't know what you're talking about, so why don't you stay silent?

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 28, 2009 4:41:44 PM PDT
BuytheBook says:
Hah! You took it out! Instead of "then it's not literary fiction" you had written "that's it's not literary fiction." Why don't you be a really big person and own up to your error???

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 29, 2009 8:25:29 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 27, 2009 4:10:01 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 29, 2009 8:44:34 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 27, 2009 4:10:00 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on May 2, 2009 1:29:24 PM PDT
R. Sakowski says:
It seems to me genra categories are flags to an established market segment. When "lierary" is used, it seems to define the book's aspirations more than a particular market.

Posted on May 4, 2009 6:30:01 AM PDT
Gary McGreal says:
Gail,

There is a certain subjectivity to what a literary novel is. Probably the easiest way to define it would be by identifying what it is not. First of all it is not generally plot driven fiction. It is not genre fiction in the normal sense (i.e. mystery, science fiction, fantasy).

Having said that there are obvious exceptions. A novel like "Dune" goes beyond normal science fiction by evoking strong mythic elements. "Rebecca" evokes the fundamental womens rite of passage myth. Myth or the journey into the subconscious are core elements of the literary novel.

The "right of passage" or "quest" novel is generally "literary". If you learn or grow as part of the process of reading the novel, you probably have a literary novel. If you are merely entertained it was probably not a literary novel.

Good writing does not make a book literary by itself. There are many examples of brilliantly written genre fiction. Nor is complexity a requirement for literary fiction. Paulo Coelho's mythic "The Alchemist" is a quintessential literary novel while being very simple in form and vocabulary.

Rilke said it best in his "Ancient Apollo", if it's art ---- "You must change"

G.L.McGreal

In reply to an earlier post on May 4, 2009 8:39:08 AM PDT
Gail Graham says:
I think at one point, the term "literary fiction" actually did mean something. It referred specifically to non-genre, well-written, even "intellectual" fiction. But as publishers were replaced by marketers, genres did indeed become "flags" to established market segments and -- I think -- "literary fiction" became a catch-all term for "everything else" or as one editor put it, "an untargetable audience" and also, relatively meaningless.

In reply to an earlier post on May 4, 2009 8:11:30 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 4, 2009 8:12:57 PM PDT
CDaniels says:
Gail, I'd say more specifically, it should be fiction that references other literature; in plot devices, character names, settings, etc. Joyce's "Ulysess" might be the ultimate example. Under this definition, there's a lot of experimental literature, avante-garde stuff that is "literary fiction" without being particularly good writing. Is it possible "literary fiction" was always a marketing term and never was particularly meaningful?

In reply to an earlier post on May 5, 2009 1:19:40 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 27, 2009 4:10:00 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on May 13, 2009 7:25:09 AM PDT
I discovered this "community" just now, and am pleased to read the commentary of intelligent, thoughtful people who know and love language--and its use in more than crass (excuse me) ways.

I wonder when the "sea change' will come. Grandma hasn't much more time. It took 14 years for a publisher, who will not take #3, because of limited sales for#2. I spent both advances, plus, on marketing. Excellent, quality reviews mean nothing in this "pig-swine" market.

Gail, the bad joke is on the likes of that agent. As a former academic, I cringe at the rapid slide downward of all things of quality. Elitism? I was taught to strive for the best, not the mediocre.

Beyond extensive reading since age three my "style" is not MFA honed. "Write what you know" is the joke when what one knows is not the norm.

Gwendoline (Gwen) Y. Fortune
Growing up 'N...' Rich. it appears that Amazon blocked the use of my full title, and Family Lines.

In reply to an earlier post on May 13, 2009 7:31:17 AM PDT
Absolutely.
This medium encourages by its anonymous format, for some people who have "issues" to display rudeness, which is, generally, a sign of ignorance and pseudo-arrogance.

In reply to an earlier post on May 13, 2009 8:22:59 AM PDT
Gail Graham says:
Yes, but perhaps it's an outlet for these people, too. It gives them a place to "vent" their aggressions and resentments. After all, if they couldn't do it harmlessly on the internet, they might decide to go out and shoot everyone in the shopping mall -- which would be a lot worse, and a lot harder to ignore.

In reply to an earlier post on May 13, 2009 8:27:59 AM PDT
Gail Graham says:
Speaking of agents, I received the most incredible communication from one of them, yesterday. It arrived in the SASE I'd submitted -- along with the first three chapters of my novel -- over a year ago! (Is this a record?) Even though my name was on the envelope I'd suppled, the letter was addressed to, Dear Author. And the signature was laboriously printed, rather than signed. Do you suppose this particular agent hands her rejection letters out to her grandkids to be signed on rainy days when there's nothing better to do? Sure looks like it to me.
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Discussion in:  Literary Fiction forum
Participants:  108
Total posts:  356
Initial post:  Mar 31, 2009
Latest post:  Oct 7, 2013

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