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need some new authors to read


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Showing 1-25 of 157 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jul 12, 2010 8:13:57 AM PDT
anonymous says:
What other books would I like to read?
if I have enjoyed:

Miss Read: Fairacre and Thrush Green series
Phillip Gulley: Home to Harmony series
Susan Albert: the Cottage Tales of Beatrix Potter
James Herriott: All Creatures Great and Small series
Jan Karon: At Home in Mitford series-the early ones
Anthony Trollope: The Warden and Barchester Towers
George MacDonald: The Curate's Awakening, The Lady's Confession, The Poet and the Pauper...and more
Lillian Braun: the Cat Who series
Richard Peck: A Long Way From Chicago, Fair Weather, Here Lies the Librarian, A Season of Gifts...and more

Thanks for any suggestions!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 12, 2010 9:11:53 AM PDT
Cordelia says:
Based on what you like, I'd say:
W.H. Russell: College Town
P.G. Wodehouse: Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit
Jasper fforde: The Eyre Affiar

Posted on Jul 12, 2010 9:55:38 AM PDT
my library here:

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003FVB83E

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 12, 2010 3:07:15 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 12, 2010 3:23:58 PM PDT
Aviva Lynne says:
An Irish Country Doctor by Patrick Taylor (first in a series)
Some Experiences of an Irish RM by E O E Somerville
Secret Lives of Walter Mitty by James Thurber
The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith (first in a series)
Death at Wenterwater Court by Carola Dunn (Daisy Dalyrmple series)
A Royal Pain by Rhys Bowen (first in a series)
Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg (or any of her other books)
Cheaper by the Dozen by Frank B. Gilbreth
The Ghost and Mrs. Muir by R A Dick
Lost Horizon by James Hilton
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
Mennonite in a Little Black Dress by Rhoda Jenzan
The English American by Alison Larkin
The Thurber Carnival by James Thurber

Posted on Jul 13, 2010 9:25:01 AM PDT
I think one book you will really enjoy is Bruce Chatwin 'On the Black Hill' Twin brothers living on a Welsh/English borders farm from which they barely strayed from their whole lives;two world wars just intrutions. Totally magic-has that farm/country setting you seem to like and its top drawer literature

Posted on Jul 13, 2010 12:51:46 PM PDT
Eric says:
'if' by George Kempis, on Kindle, I believe.

Posted on Jul 14, 2010 6:37:41 AM PDT
You could try using http://www.whatshouldireadnext.com/ and http://www.whichbook.net/ to see what to read next. I've heard good things about them.

Kristan
Author of Twenty-Somewhere
kristanhoffman.com - writing dreams into reality

Posted on Jul 15, 2010 6:36:42 AM PDT
anonymous says:
Thanks Colleen, Matthew, Aviva, adm of Saul, Jonathan and Kristan for the suggestions. I will be picking up at the library today to try Standing in the Rainbow by Flagg and On the Black Hill by Chatwin.
Anne

Posted on Jul 15, 2010 11:46:23 AM PDT
Green Dolphin Street

And older work but a terrific one. A man *accidentally* marries the wrong woman! Atmosphere in historical England and subsequent high adventure in New Zealand. A novel of the First Water.

I'm familiar with your most recent reading. If you want something newer, try this excellent tale: Company of Liars: A Novel or The Little Stranger. I've written detailed reviews of them all.

Best regards.

pat

Posted on Jul 16, 2010 11:46:56 AM PDT
The Seventh Compass Point Of Death is now on Amazon, the Kindle Store and smashwords.com.

THE LIT-CRIT TAKE: A character and language-driven thriller, centering on the themes of terrorism, understanding and hope.

THE PURE PLOT PITCH: Here's bad day: Guy sets out to rob a bank but ends up pulling a carjacking, and when he's arrested a body is found in the trunk. The victim is a Sunni community leader, and why was he killed? Who killed him? The search for answers takes me into a homegrown Islamic terror underground, into plots, counterplots, deceptions and love affairs, all leading to an attack on a major NYC landmark.

For a quick taste, please go to
https://authorcentral.amazon.com/gp/blog?ie=UTF8&%2AVersion%2A=1&%2Aentries%2A=0

If you have time to write a review, please please do.

WHO THE HELL AM I? I worked as an Executive Editor at Entertainment Weekly for 11 years and (in two separate stints) at People magazine and people.com for 12 years. I often speak to young journalists and try to use myself as an example for inspiration-a guy who spent time in jail, rehab and a psych ward and somehow went on to become a successful editor at Time Inc. and managed to keep himself sane and alive. I've tried to reflect those experiences in this book.

You can contact me on FaceBook. Many thanks!

Posted on Jul 19, 2010 7:58:27 AM PDT
CONFESSION FROM A STRANGER

nice one for 99 cents.

Posted on Jul 30, 2010 7:35:46 PM PDT
memories of a forgotten past
discoveries of a hidden past
the daughters of nora crawford

Posted on Jul 31, 2010 6:31:34 AM PDT
Simon Fenn says:
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Posted on Aug 1, 2010 7:54:47 PM PDT
The Pen Pal
This review is from: The Pen Pal (Volume 1) (Paperback)
Shaymus O'Shea is the kind of people we wonder about when we hear disturbing news stories of people's disappearances and seriel killers at large. We wonder what kind of monsters commit such cruel and senseless killings. We associate them with the worst nightmare we have had. Sure, there have been many studies about the psychology behind the profiles of seriel killers. Some say it is a disease. It is as if anything we human beings don't like can be blamed on some anomolies of our body and mind.

Read Richard Banegas' "The Pen Pal", and you will be disturbed and shocked. Remember "Silence of the Lamb"? Remember Joseph Congrad's "Heaart of Darkness"? You will get that. But you will also get something else. "The Pen Pal" takes a unique perpective to a crime story and reveals something completely unexpected. The story has a slow start and for a while you may not recognize what you are reading. The setting is early 20th century in the countryside of Irland. It reads like a tale of the growing up of a boy, surrounded by a large family. You can smell, hear and feel the life of the people in this little town.

And then subtly, you feel something creeping up. Only you can decide what you read, because you will be led through a dialogue, not about somebody else, but about you, as a human being. Only you will decide what you learn.

The author has the pungent style that reminds me of New Yord Book Bestseller author Augusten Burroughs. He does not just write, he engraves, spits, and shouts out his words.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This review is from: The Pen Pal (Volume 1) (Paperback)
I have read all of Richard's books and find this one to by my favorite by far. His character development is amazing and his writing style is a natural rawness that makes you feel like the story is being told to you in person rather then reading it in writing. There are a wide range of emotions that the characters feel throughout the book and as you read it, you feel those same emotions. Its reviting, captivating, and a story worth reading and sharing with others. I believe Richard has talent to go far in the literature world and look forward to seeing what else he publishes.

for a book you won't want to put down, here is The Pen Pal

http://justaddfictionbooks.com

Posted on Aug 7, 2010 9:17:10 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 7, 2010 9:18:06 AM PDT
Doris says:
Believable Lies When you're looking for something new, here's a new book of short stories. Check it out and I think you'll be impressed. For $2.99. Read the review from John Dufresne.

Posted on Aug 9, 2010 5:58:09 AM PDT
Event Field by Elaine Morrison 9780595531554 also in eBook 9780595632176

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 9, 2010 12:07:19 PM PDT
Lark Spurr says:
Loved most of your suggestions. THe ones I haaven't read, I am going to. I syggest for you Laura Lippman, Alice Thrift by Elinor Lipman, How Green was my Valley, Seashells by Rosamund Pilcher (very sweet anad saatisfying).I am sure I will think of more laer.

Posted on Aug 11, 2010 5:44:23 AM PDT
A review of Persona: A Novella and 5 Stories

"I came across this in a discussion forum and decided to purchase it because the description was so intriguing... So far I have only read the novella. And it is a VERY STRANGE book. "Coastal Road" is as beautiful as it is strange. The main plot is either a love story or a trip to the coast that some of the characters take together. All of the characters have a strange ephemeral quality. The first lines are about memory, and I think maybe they represent memories of people and not people. The story takes place in an unknown country, although it feels like South America- some characters are tourists and others are squatters- something like hippies or gypsies. I find myself struggling to describe it, because it almost seems like 2 or 3 of the characters might actually be a single person, and the story makes sense to me either way. Misunderstanding is a theme throughout and the characters often seem to be discussing different things. So either it is something like On the Road, with magical realist twist, or it may very well be the strangest, most schizophrenic love story that I have ever read. If the characters are all different then there is a great deal of nihilism in the book, but at the same time if some of them are the same, it completely changes the dynamic and there appears to be a great deal of compassion...The ending is strange and beautiful. The rhythms make it even more complicated as your mind changes because you read things faster or slower, which alone made the book worth reading. I haven't had a chance to read any of the stories yet, although I am looking forward to "What the Water Said," because the description sounded equally bizarre... It is a great book if you want something to turn over in your head. It's like reading two books written with the same words."

Posted on Aug 17, 2010 11:00:43 AM PDT
Julie Ann says:
Based on what you've read, you may like The Kindness of Strangers. It's only .99 for the kindle version and there's a sample available.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 23, 2010 8:50:56 PM PDT
Raquel says:
LOST LETTER by Neil MulliganLost Letter
Deep Creek by Dana HandDeep Creek

Posted on Aug 24, 2010 6:22:05 AM PDT
Wordsworth says:
Try this one.For the Beauty of the Earth: A Novel

Posted on Aug 28, 2010 5:53:06 PM PDT
Book Lover says:
I would strongly recommend 'The Fan Tan Players' by Julian lees

Posted on Sep 16, 2010 9:44:04 PM PDT
Jan says:
The Constant Travellers\
The Constant Travellers by Gordon Basichis
Sex, drugs, and the West that never was. In a novel at once raucously funny and deeply philosophical, author Gordon Basichis explores one man's continuing search to unlock life's elusive mysteries.

Setting out for the Far West after the Civil War, young Shelby Lopez encounters Indian mystic Thunderbird Hawkins. With the help of his marijuana, peyote, and "magic mushrooms," the Indian teaches Shelby of the Great Necklace and the Great Book, which when brought together, lead on to wisdom and an understanding of man's destiny.

The history of the Great Necklace and the Great Book stretches from the conquistadors to river gamblers, and finally to the frontier town of Star City. But even as mystic and disciple prepare to join the two sacred objects, they realize that they are not yet meant to be brought together, and that they themselves must return to their lives as The Constant Travellers.

Humor, insight,violence and passion combine in this brilliant thought provoking narrative to create an unforgettable story. While set in the Old West, the novel assumes a modern idiom and is as contemporary as the hip scene of today.

You might also have read Basichis' new book - The Guys Who Spied for China.

Posted on Sep 16, 2010 10:14:58 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Jul 4, 2013 12:59:41 AM PDT]

Posted on Sep 17, 2010 9:36:20 PM PDT
Claire says:
Anthony Trollope's "The Way We Live Now"
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Discussion in:  Literary Fiction forum
Participants:  121
Total posts:  157
Initial post:  Jul 12, 2010
Latest post:  Mar 24, 2012

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