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What are the best described regions, cities, towns in literary fiction?


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Showing 1-14 of 14 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jun 8, 2012 3:03:30 PM PDT
What are the best described regions, cities, towns in literary fiction in your own opinion and what book made you think that way? What made you feel like you were actually in the place seeing, experiencing, almost feeling the scents in your nose of the place? Even made you feel like wanting to travel there just to see what the place really is like in reality?

Posted on Jun 10, 2012 6:21:23 PM PDT
It's not necessarily fiction but Edward Abbey's 'Desert Solitaire' is a beautifully described narrative that includes discussion on the plant and animal life of the Utah desert lands. His scientific knowledge about the natural world complements his intuitive and passionate writing about the need for protecting the environment. I have visited the Utah desert many times and Abbey is a writer that truly can transport one there simply with his words.

Posted on Jun 10, 2012 6:29:30 PM PDT
It's not necessarily fiction but Edward Abbey's 'Desert Solitaire' is a beautifully described narrative that includes discussion on the plant and animal life of the Utah desert lands. His scientific knowledge about the natural world complements his intuitive and passionate writing about the need for protecting the environment. I have visited the Utah desert many times and Abbey is a writer that truly can transport one there simply with his words.

Posted on Jun 10, 2012 10:50:16 PM PDT
Quinton Blue says:
Kinsella's "Shoeless Joe" brought Iowa alive.

Posted on Jun 11, 2012 11:25:52 PM PDT
Frank Mundo says:
Winesburg, Ohio (Bantam Classic) is perfect for this topic. Excellent writing.

Posted on Jun 13, 2012 3:40:52 PM PDT
Among many other places, I've actually considered traveling to Iowa at some point to see the Iowa places inspired by "Shoeless Joe", "What's Eating Gilbert Grape" and even "The Bridges of Madison County", also bumping to see the place "where the music died" in Clear Lake.
I lived a year in Upstate New York when I was 17, so would love to hear if anyone's ever read a fiction book that describes that region well, especially Central New York, specifically Finger Lakes region. All tips welcome...

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 29, 2012 4:18:10 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 29, 2012 4:19:20 AM PDT
Limelite says:
Russell Banks lives in Albany and has set three of his novels there. Who can forget William Kennedy's Depression Era Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "Ironweed" (part of a trio of books that take place there)?

Posted on Jun 29, 2012 11:43:58 AM PDT
I set my first novel (Poker Tales) in Las Vegas.

Posted on Jul 8, 2012 4:46:40 PM PDT
In The Country of No Compassion
All of the stories in the collection are masterful, but I think Teresa Kennedy paints a picture of the Immigrants, legal or no on the southwest border with the kind of understanding that the news media and the lawmakers just don't get.

Posted on Jul 28, 2012 6:47:13 AM PDT
Jacob King says:
Italy Calvino's novel Invisible Cities is on one level a series of descriptions of fantastic imaginary places but at the same time it is the account of an exile, Marco Polo, meditating on Venice. This is one of the best books of the twentieth century.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 1, 2012 11:00:34 AM PDT
John D. MacDonald's Travis McGee series. I'm a Floridian and during a time when I was banished to the cold north-land, I would curl up in front of the fire and read John D. It made me feel like there was sand between my toes.

Posted on Aug 2, 2012 9:22:05 AM PDT
R May says:
A Journey Around My Room by Xavier de Maistre.

It's just his room. Most evocations of place are unconvincing anyway.

Posted on Aug 5, 2012 5:21:30 PM PDT
Andrew Hays says:
The Stories of Breece D'J Pancake - Breece D'J Pancake

Winesburg, Ohio - Sherwood Anderson

The Meely LeBauve trilogy - Ken Wells

Posted on Aug 20, 2012 1:53:58 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 20, 2012 1:54:46 PM PDT
Stephen King and Maine. I have never been to America but I feel that I can find my way around Maine without a map without being lost, LOL:)
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Discussion in:  Literary Fiction forum
Participants:  12
Total posts:  14
Initial post:  Jun 8, 2012
Latest post:  Aug 20, 2012

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