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Memoirs of Women Misfits


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Initial post: Oct 6, 2009 10:45:57 AM PDT
I'm trying to build a list of memoirs about women who were, in essence, misfits -- either by chance or by choice. They zigged while others zagged; faced challenges other women didn't; were born in a time that didn't fully understand them, etc., etc.

If they ended up being role models, all the better. Particularly interested in women who either couldn't have children or chose not to be mothers. Eager to hear your suggestions...

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 6, 2009 1:13:38 PM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Oct 6, 2009 1:13:57 PM PDT]

Posted on Oct 18, 2009 7:50:15 AM PDT
Leahsandra says:
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Posted on Oct 18, 2009 7:55:18 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 18, 2009 8:11:29 AM PDT
Leahsandra says:
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Posted on Oct 18, 2009 8:07:36 AM PDT
Leahsandra says:
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Posted on Oct 18, 2009 10:04:48 AM PDT
Lift Perhaps this might fit your list...

Posted on Oct 18, 2009 10:18:38 AM PDT
Musical Chairs by Jen Knox is a new book, full of misfit behavior. What I like about it is the fact that the author doesn't make apologies for any of her decisions.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 19, 2009 8:55:08 AM PDT
JLamp says:
Candy Girl by Diablo Cody (screen writer and producer of indie film Juno) is excellent misfit memoir. It chronicles her year-long experiment with exotic dancing. It was at times shocking, at others hilarious, and always sharp.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 16, 2009 7:03:21 PM PST
Tales of the Titmouse Involved with drug smuggling in the 1970's, abused as a child, mom was undiagnosed bi-polar, overdosed at 30 and walked away with a completely changed life. Couldn't have children. My memoir is centered around my time in the drug world, but it touches on many issues common to women who pick the wrong person to love, make unhealthy choices and sometimes lose their lives and never get that second chance. This book took me 20 years to complete and during that time I used my story to help many people to find hope. Pamela Barrett

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 16, 2009 8:38:55 PM PST
Going Rouge: Sarah Palin

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 18, 2009 9:12:17 AM PST
If you're interested in historical misfit women, you could research any of the suffragettes of the early 1900s and the early feminists of the 1960s and 1970s.

I'm distantly related to Victoria Claflin Woodhull, also called "Mrs. Satan." She was married twice, but history remembers her and her sister Tennessee rather than any men in their lives. They owned their own brokerage firm in NYC, they advocated many women's rights including access to birth control, and Victoria even ran for President -- BEFORE women were allowed to vote. I don't think either Claflin girl wrote a memoir, but there are several biographies.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2009 7:36:17 PM PST
K. Vazquez says:
Hello P.M.
This is a group I certainly do fit into! Ha! I am a 41 year old woman with no children. And my life, well... I did my way! I never failed to surprise myself or others.

My memoir is called Living in the Rear View Mirror: From Substance Abuse to A Life of Substance. Most of my life I had some pretty fantastic spiritual gifts that I tried to keep at bay. That made me feel very different! So I learned how to keep secrets about myself to the point where I could be surrounded by loved ones and friends and still feel very much alone. That, and many more issues made me ripe for a prescription pill addiction that resulted once I began to suffer with migraines.

Once in recovery, I accepted my spiritual gifts and completely transformed my life. I work with others to help them do the same. I help others learn how to tune into their divine guidance. It's only now, after all these years and after quite a lot of healing do I understand the reason why everything happened as it did. So I could help others...

Peace & Love,
Kim Vazquez
Living in the Rear View Mirror: From Substance Abuse to a Life of Substance

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 20, 2009 8:13:07 PM PST
Joie Lake says:
Kim, I don't remember if I've communicated this to you previously, but you stole my title! Mine is/was "Life in the Rear View Mirror." Most likely that will be a chapter of my book, but you've got good taste !!

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2009 4:04:46 PM PST
mdesigner says:
My Daughter's Addiction - A Thief in the Family: Hardwired for Heroin (Volume 1)

My memoir is about my daughters heroin addiction. I did choose to be a mother; have never regretted it. But I did always feel like an outsider, particularly in the choices I made to support my daughter.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2009 4:25:05 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Dec 28, 2009 5:46:12 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2009 5:01:56 PM PST
Bean Slap says:
"I, Phoolan Devi" by Phoolan Devi. I'm reading it right now. She was known as the bandit queen and sought justified revenge on the men who gang raped her.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2009 5:03:58 PM PST
Bean Slap says:
Palin....definitely a misfit! Hopefully she will be forgotten in time like Yugo cars.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2009 5:06:04 PM PST
Bean Slap says:
Dawn,
Lucky!!! Thats real cool youre related to a prominent suffragette!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2010 6:05:34 AM PST
JacquieB says:
P.M.
In my day we were called 'black sheep' but it's about the same as misfits. I did have children although at times I bet they'd wish I hadn't. I am a 56 year old woman who's survived a brain chemical imbalance (bi-polar), ocd and to date have done it without medication. I DO NOT think people should go off of their medication but I do believe the brain can be trained in conjunction with it! Forty years ago there was no such name for these conditions, help or medication and therefore I had to train my brain to be accepted in a 'normal' world and the result was turning my condition into another being known as 'HER'. I now live with what is virtually a twin, even if an evil one. Before It Had A Name is my story of survival through a sons death and six divorces to eventually find the hero of my life who has taught me, again, how to laugh at myself and life. Last, but far from least, is my leaning on the Lord to keep in mind that if he didn't think I was strong enough he would not have allowed me to deal with all of this. I have managed to find joy in my life! I still suffer the condition but have changed the 'outward' appearance and actions. I'd created two systems which have helped me. Brain Coffins for the daily mental clutter and Brain Brakes for a softer landing after the extreme highs. Before It Had A Name is available right here on Amazon. ISBN# 1605633321 Before It Had a Name

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 18, 2010 2:55:06 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 18, 2010 2:56:59 PM PST
D. Mason says:
"Walls" by Hiltgunt Zassenhaus. A German woman who felt the Nazi regime was evil fron the beginning and eventually saved the lives of hundreds of Dutch POW's at great danger to herself.Great story

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 19, 2010 8:28:13 PM PST
R.M. Putnam says:
Misfit? Yes, that is me. I grew up in a time that stuttering labeled me as "Dummy" and being raised by a women who took delight in punishing me to an extreme, made me a misfit. Shy and withdrawn school was a living nightmare. I'd like you to know that I did over come the odds, became a teacher and later a writer of fantasy. I run my own business yet have to admit I guess I am still somewhat of a misfit, nevertheless I am proud of it and I hope a role model for those woman who need escape. Here is a synopsis of my memoir:

Synopsis:
This story is about a child growing up in a world of abuse that led her to become an ongoing victim as an adult. Rebecca falls to the stereotypical battered wife syndrome. She deals with survival in a world of starvation, brutal beatings, and humiliation that excel to rape and entrapment.
During Rebecca's growing year's society found it in her best interest for her to stay in her situation despite the evidence of serious abuse. Having grown to become a battered wife, she found escape and literally reinvented herself. Now she tells her story in hopes of helping others. A spirit that over came the odds and made her dreams come true.

Available on Kindle
The Dark Secrets of Rebecca Marie
soon to be released on Amazon the Paperback issue

Posted on May 1, 2010 12:34:54 AM PDT
Certainly a misfit!...
Hi everyone, I have written my first book, a memoir set in the 80's in the suburbs of London.

For a limited time it is 99 cents on Kindle and it's called Invisible Tears

This is the story of Abbie's struggle to survive, the grim details of child abuse of the worst kind all told from the perspective of a little girl. As a teenager Abbie is uncontrollable. A Modette during the 80's revival, she finds a love of scooters, rebellion and gang life on the wild side. Dulling her pain with alcohol, drugs and promiscuity at a very young age she loses control and becomes well known to the local police.

Her family eventually disowns her realizing they are unable to help. Abbie finds herself in the care of the Court until she is abandoned by children's homes and Social Services too. Alone, penniless and pregnant at the age of 16, she is haunted by the secrets of her unspeakable past. Will anyone ever see her invisible tears?

Posted on Jun 2, 2010 5:12:26 PM PDT
I think this qualifies:
Perfectly Revolting: My Glamorous Cartooning Career

Posted on Jul 3, 2010 4:26:27 AM PDT
Orviella says:
A memoir about a woman who does her own thing? I recently came upon a must read spiritually oriented memoir 'Running into Myself: A Journey Through the Soul of the Feat' written by British author, Thea Euryphaessa. If you're a fan of either 'Eat Pray Love' or 'Women Who Run with the Wolves', you *have* to read this book. I left a five star review at the book's page. In the meantime here's the synopsis:

While celebrating her 26th birthday, Thea listens on as her thirty-something friends discuss their lives. Their conversation leads her to realise she's been drifting through life and hasn't grown up. In addition, she can't tell where she ends and her mother begins. The realisation gradually takes its toll and several months later, she's diagnosed with depression. Refusing medication, she leaves her soul-constricting job and pursues a more meaningful path. Along the way she discovers spirituality in particular, Japanese Energy healing but with a fragile sense of Self, lacks the confidence and belief required to cross the threshold to a new life. Instead, she unquestioningly accepts others' views on life and slides back into a mundane existence.

Three years later a terrifying nightmare provides another wake-up call. This time with no game plan, she sells her house, leaves her 9-5 job and embarks on a relationship that takes her to Santa Fe (US). Once there, she encounters several mentors who introduce her to Jungian psychology, Greek mythology, BodySoul work, fairytales, folk tales and alchemical symbolism. Soon after, overweight and unable to run more than a few metres at a time, she impulsively signs up for three marathons New York, Rome and Athens with the first only months away.

What unfolds over the next eighteen months is an inspiring rite of passage into conscious womanhood: an unintentional pilgrimage healing old wounds, and a revelatory experience with her deep Self. The book is a personal narrative accompanied by examinations of myth and depth psychology, in which life illuminates ancient tales and archetypes find form in modern experience.

She also has a dedicated book website at Running into Myself dot com. And a spiritually oriented website which can be found at Urban Deva dot com.

Thanks for creating this thread!

- Thalia

Posted on Jul 10, 2010 3:48:50 PM PDT
The Most Revolutionary Act: Memoir of an American Refugee
I can cop to being a misfit. Perhaps a more apt description is "walking anachronism." I have the bad habit to being in the wrong place in the wrong time. As well as speaking out on topics about 10 years before the rest of the American public is ready to speak out on them. I am a 62 year old psychiatrist, single mother and activist. My recent memoir describes the difficult decision I made in 2002 - as the result of 15 years of intense government harassment - to close my 25-year Seattle practice to start a new life in New Zealand. Unfortunately they were people in high places who didn't like what I was thinking or saying enough to try to destroy my life and career - and at one point to make attempts on my life.
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Discussion in:  Memoir forum
Participants:  62
Total posts:  83
Initial post:  Oct 6, 2009
Latest post:  Nov 23, 2012

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