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Customer Discussions > Movie forum

The top ten anything thread


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Showing 226-250 of 1000 posts in this discussion
Posted on May 21, 2012 6:36:08 PM PDT
Top Ten Favorite Classic Film Composers:

Max Steiner
Alfred Newman
Dimitri Tiomkin
Bernard Herrmann
Hugo Friedhofer
Johnny Green
Alex North
Elmer Bernstein
Jerry Goldsmith
John Barry
Leonard Rosenman

In reply to an earlier post on May 21, 2012 6:42:01 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 22, 2012 8:35:45 AM PDT
KatieHepburn says:
No Ennio Morricone?

Posted on May 21, 2012 6:59:32 PM PDT
RichieV says:
Ten interesting characters

Han Solo- The Empire strikes back
Nick Naylor- Thank you for smoking
Emma Peel- The Avengers (TV)
Scott hastings- Strictly Ballroom
Stephanie Plum - One for the money (Book)
Man with no name/Blondie- The Good the bad and the ugly
Lucy Ricardo- I love Lucy (TV)
Garp-World according to Garp
James T Kirk- Star Trek (TV)
Shaggy- Scooby do (Cartoon)

Posted on May 21, 2012 7:28:17 PM PDT
RichieV says:
Ten best combinations (In no particular order)

Rum and coke
Lennon and McCartney
Gilligan and the Skipper
H2 and O
Marty Jannetty and Sean Micheals
Peanut butter and Jelly
Zorn and Largent
Kirk and Spock
Mohammad Ali's Left and right fists
Chips and Salsa

Posted on May 21, 2012 7:43:36 PM PDT
RichieV says:
Ten worst combinations

Hatfields and McCoys
Driving and Texting
Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie
Beer and Eggs (Especially in about an hour)
Oil and Water
Wicked Witch of the West and flying monkeys
Positive and Negative
Arnold Schwarzenegger and Maria Shriver
Uwe Boll and Video games
God and the Devil

Posted on May 21, 2012 11:19:14 PM PDT
Top Ten Songs Which Were Nominated but Failed to Win the Oscar:

The Best of Everything (Alfred Newman-Sammy Cahn)
You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To (Cole Porter)
I Fall in Love Too Easily (Jule Styne-Sammy Cahn)
I Couldn't Sleep a Wink Last Night (Jimmy McHugh-Harold Adamson)
I Wish I Didn't Love You So (Frank Loesser)
The Man That Got Away (Harold Arlen-Ira Gershwin)
Tender Is the Night (Sammy Fain-Paul Francis Webster)
A Time for Love (Johnny Mandel-Paul Francis Webster)
The Second Time Around (James van Heusen-Sammy Cahn)
A Certain Smile (Henry Mancini-Johnny Mercer)

Posted on May 22, 2012 7:27:52 AM PDT
Ten actors who often did character voices on "The Flintstones" show (besides the main cast of Fred, Wilma, Barney, and Betty)

Hal Smith (Otis Campbell from The Andy Griffith Show)
June Foray (Rocky the flying squirrel, Witch Hazel, many other characters on TV and radio)
Frank Nelson (several roles on I Love Lucy, lots of other shows)
Don Messick (Scooby Doo, Booboo Bear, Papa Smurf)
Howard Morris (Ernest T. Bass from The Andy Griffith Show, the Professor in High Anxiety, etc)
John Stephenson (Hogan's Heroes, some villains on Scooby-Doo)
Daws Butler (Elroy Jetson, Yogi Bear, many other Hanna Barbera characters)
Paul Frees (tons of voice roles in cartoons and movies, also Disney's Ludwig Von Drake)
Verna Felton (The Queen of Hearts from Disney's Alice in Wonderland, etc)
Harvey Korman (Mel Brooks movies, Carol Burnett sketches, etc etc)

Posted on May 22, 2012 8:36:25 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 22, 2012 8:54:23 AM PDT
R0cK-N-RoLLA says:
10 Movies With The Word "Balls" In The Title:

Balls of Fury
Screwballs
Great Balls of Fire
Spaceballs
Golf Balls!
Meatballs
Balls Out: Gary The Tennis Coach
Goofballs
Beach Balls
Gutterballs

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 8:45:09 AM PDT
KatieHepburn says:
Now that's a jewel of a list...

Posted on May 22, 2012 9:02:04 AM PDT
Ten essential grunge albums:

Ten- Pearl Jam
In Utero- Nirvana
Superunknown- Soundgarden
Dirt- Alice In Chains
Temple of the Dog- Temple of the Dog
Apple- Mother Love Bone
Dry as a Bone/Rehab Doll- Green River
Sweet Oblivion- Screaming Trees
Nevermind- Nirvana
Vitalogy- Pearl Jam

Posted on May 22, 2012 10:05:50 AM PDT
Mike Gordan says:
Top 10 films of 2012 that I've seen (so far):

1. The Avengers (probably will wind up being the Best film of the year, but I'll wait and see)
2. Act of Valor (very good pro-military propaganda about the Marines)
3. The Pirates! Band of Misfits (good and quite funny; Aardman rarely ever lets me down)
4. 21 Jump Street (good and entertaining)
5. Chronicle (very unique and quite entertaining)
6. Haywire (an intelligent thriller, but not terribly entertaining)
7. The Grey (good only for the initial viewing)
8. Dark Shadows (meh, with a few entertaining tidbits every now and then)
9. The Woman in Black (meh; a little bit underwhelming, but still watchable)
10.The Hunger Games (not a particularly good film, but better than a lot of other films I've seen so far)

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 10:07:35 AM PDT
@Cinematic God: I doubt that The Avengers will be quite as satisfying as The Dark Knight Rises or The Hobbit.

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 10:47:34 AM PDT
Mike Gordan says:
Muppets: I'd be gravely disappointed if The Dark Knight Rises, The Hobbit, or Django Unchained fail to satisfy me or so much as secure spots on my Top 10 Best films of the Year list when the year ends. Amazing Spider-Man? Less so, but I am expecting it to earn a spot on my list, if not for a good while. There's also an animated film from India that looks very, very interesting.

Other films on my list of films to watch this year? Men in Black III, Prometheus, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, Ice Age 4, The Bourne Legacy, Total Recall, Argo, Skyfall, and some reservations for Rock of Ages.

Brave, well, I am anticipating it to be better (or, to be more accurate, more less bad) than Finding Nemo, Wall-E, Up, or Cars 2, which isn't saying much, but the more I see of the film, the less I think of the movie. It should be noted too that the plot sounds to be painfully muddled for such a simple movie. It's like the trailers are trying to give us the plot as to what to expect, while simultaneously being really, really, really, really vague regarding the plot. The princess is the main character and the hero this time, she doesn't want to marry this guy because he looks weird, and this causes all kinds of problems. In other words, our hero is another one of these feministic brats that run rampant in modern animated films even when they bear (which, speaking of, is an animal that seems to be important to the film in some way that I don't understand at all) little to no bearing to the overall setting of the film.

If anything, I can't wait until Pixar enters their neo-surrealist phase because their next two films after Monsters University (a whiplash of expectations regarding the continuation of the Monsters Inc. universe) seem to be very creative. Let's just hope they go all out with their premises and give us some very inventive pictures. But until then, Brave will might as well serve as the decider as to whether or not I will ever watch another Pixar film on the big screen again.

So if the films I see on the silver screen do meet my expectations (both the films I'm looking forward to, and the films I stumble upon down the road), then my top 10 films of the year list will look drastically different by the end of the year as it would now. I am, however, anticipating that The Avengers and Act of Valor will have spots on my top 10 list by the end of the year though.

Posted on May 22, 2012 10:50:15 AM PDT
Mike Gordan says:
My top 10 films of 1963:

1. The Great Escape
2. From Russia with Love
3. High and Low
4. The Haunting
5. It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World
6. Tom Jones
7. The Birds
8. Charade
9. The Nutty Professor
10.Hud

Tom Jones is most definitely the most unique film ever to win Best Picture; there is literally nothing else like it, and the world will never know why the Academy chose to award the film Best Picture that year as it goes against every single solitary tradition that the Academy is known for.

Posted on May 22, 2012 11:33:10 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 22, 2012 3:52:16 PM PDT
R0cK-N-RoLLA says:
10 Ten/10 Movies:

10
Ten Little Indians
Force 10 From Navarone
10,000 B.C.
The 10th Victim
The Ten Commandments
10 Things I Hate About You
10 Items or Less
The Whole Ten Yards
How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days

Posted on May 22, 2012 11:51:36 AM PDT
RichieV says:
Ten best dirty punchlines

Five Dollars, same as in town.
Bubba is that you?
The aristocrats!
30 years old, and you still believe in leprechauns?
"that guy bet me five hundred dollars that he could pee on the bartender, and the bartender would be happy about it."
...when I played in the sandbox, the cat kept covering me up.
If we can find my Semi we can all just ride out of here
How do you think I rang the doorbell
Because Santa only comes once a year
So Mickey Mouse says, Crazy? no, I said she was "F'n" Goofy

Posted on May 22, 2012 11:57:26 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 22, 2012 1:27:06 PM PDT
Speaking of 1963, I would like to say a few kind words about the poor, unfairly reviled CLEOPATRA. Inspite of what Elizabeth Taylor was unable to bring to the role, there was assembled a most talented group of actors, including Harrison, Burton, Hume Cronyn, Martin Landau, Michael Hordern. This wasn't Shakespeare but it was certainly a more literate script than the average sex-and-sandal epic, as we used to call them. Leon Shamroy's brilliant photography deservedly won the Oscar and Alex North's magnificent score is one of the all-time greats. CLEOPATRA had the misfortune of being produced and finanaced by 20th Century-Fox, which was a moribund studio at that time with the lot closed and the money for completion of the film cut off. Under those conditions, it's a wonder it was finished at all.

I was at the opening day screening at the 3000 seat Pantages Theatre in Hollywood sitting in the front row of the balcony. The film began and it took forever for the curtain to open (remember curtains?) on the giant screen. Alex North's beautiful score begins with the opening credits and then the artful animation used to separate the chapters. It was really impressive and everything a young kid could want in a movie.

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 1:15:44 PM PDT
Mike Gordan says:
Jeff: re: Ceopatra: Meh!

Interesting to note that the film was both the highest grossing film of 1963 AND the biggest box office bomb of the year. In addition to that, it was a Best Picture nominee and a critical disaster, even today. It is now often regarded as one of the worst films ever made...as a Best Picture nominee.

I do not consider the film to be in the same league as The Greatest Show on Earth, The Last Emperor, The English Patient, Life is Beautiful, Precious, Babel, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (WHY!!?), or the entire list of nominees for Best Picture of 2008 (except, perhaps, Frost/Nixon which was just an okay picture) just to name a few, but it had no business being nominated.

I'd group Cleopatra among the list of completely worthless BP nominees like Rain Man, The Departed, and everything nominated in the 2nd Oscar ceremony (except for the lost Patriot); yeah, Broadway Melody was entertaining, but I know better to know that it isn't a good movie so much as it is a stepping stone in the evolution of cinema...and some may argue that there were better examples of such around that time.

Posted on May 22, 2012 1:25:00 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 22, 2012 1:29:58 PM PDT
Mike Gordan says:
Okay, here's a new list of the 10 worst films ever to win Best Picture and had absolutely no business being nominated in the first place:

An American in Paris
Cavalcade
Crash
The English Patient
Gigi
The Greatest Show on Earth
The Great Ziegfeld
The Last Emperor
Oliver!
Slumdog Millionaire

And the list of films that aren't as bad, but I have absolutely no business dealing with:

The Apartment
The Departed
Gladiator
It Happened One Night
In the Heat of the Night
Kramer vs. Kramer
Million Dollar Baby
Terms of Endearment
West Side Story
You Can't Take it With You

And the film that is completely forgettable:

Marty

And the one-hit wonder:

Schindler's List

Oh, yeah! Here's a list of the 10 Best Pictures that I like but everyone else seems to hate:

Around the World in 80 Days
A Beautiful Mind
Best Years of Our Lives
Braveheart
Chariots of Fire
Chicago
Forrest Gump
Ordinary People
Out of Africa
Tom Jones

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 1:41:17 PM PDT
Certain lists here should really be titled "My List of (whatever the items are)" ... instead of being presented like they're universally accepted by society as gospel truth.

Posted on May 22, 2012 2:01:44 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 22, 2012 2:05:02 PM PDT
Cinematic:

You and I are in severe disagreement concerning the great films, but it's interesting that we are in strong agreement on the very worst films. I agree completely with the first part of your Best Picture list and would argue only two of the films on the second part of your list. However, I do think we should cancel our movie date this weekend; our film tastes appear to be quite different.

As for 1963, my Best Picture list for a very weak year would be:

The Great Escape
Toys in the Attic
All the Way Home
The Nutty Professor
America America
Winter Light
Lord of the Flies
The L-Shaped Room
The Great Escape
Hud

I also had fun with:

The Balcony
The List of Adrienne Messenger
Knife in the Water
The Trial
8 1/2
...and, of course, the afore mentioned Cleopatra.

My favorites tend toward dramas, I have to admit.

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 2:03:13 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 22, 2012 2:04:33 PM PDT
Cleopatra is a far from worthless film. I believe that it remains the most expensive film ever made, when adjusted for inflation. The sheer physical scale of the film is still extremely impressive. The score, as noted above, is very fine. Some of the performances--notably Rex Harrison as Julius Caesar and Roddy McDowall as Octavius--are quite good. Mankiewicz was trying for a thoughtful approach to the story--one of the reasons that the film is so long, and I again believe originally planned to be a bit longer.

I always find that it reads like two films, divided by the death of Caesar and the intermission. The first half is excellent; but the life goes out of the film when Caesar dies and Anthony takes center stage. The amours of Burton and Taylor may have paralleled those of their characters, but those amours ruined their performances. Taylor had a kind of natural shrewishness that began to come out in her work with Butterfield 8; she was the most famous actress in the world, but at the end of the day not the right person to play Cleopatra. (One wag called her the fishwife of the Nile.) In earlier versions, both Vivian Leigh and Claudette Colbert were more convincing--the former largely because of Shaw's wonderful play.

In a perfect world, I wonder who could really do the character of Cleopatra justice. Hedy Lamarr? Ava Gardner?

Posted on May 22, 2012 2:07:16 PM PDT
Joan Collins?

: )

Posted on May 22, 2012 2:08:46 PM PDT
Jeff: I can't imagine a 1963 best list without Tom Jones. And I suspect were I to make one, it would include The List of Adrian Messenger--a perfectly delightful confection of a film.

Posted on May 22, 2012 2:18:11 PM PDT
Jeff: Actually, since she was under contract to Fox, and because of her unforgettable performance in Land Of the Pharaohs (for its faults, a livelier and more entertaining film than Cleopatra--and please remember that I like Cleopatra), she was under consideration for the role.
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Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  125
Total posts:  6321
Initial post:  May 16, 2012
Latest post:  2 days ago

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