Customer Discussions > Movie forum

Films That Gained Your Respect


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-12 of 12 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 10, 2012 11:45:44 AM PST
Mine would have to be the last 2 Matrix films. Not because of the story or anything like that. I watch the Matrix Experience DVD and watching the production. I had to say that I was blown away by the amount of time they spent on those films. Say what you want about the movies, but the effort put into making them was epic.

Posted on Nov 10, 2012 6:03:37 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 10, 2012 6:04:34 PM PST
J. Baker says:
>"but the effort put into making them was epic"<

I cannot respect anything for that reason alone. That's like saying a dinner is praiseworthy because it took them so long and was so hard to make. If it's inedible, who cares?

A movie that has gained my respect more and more through the years is 'The Birds'. I didn't even like it the first time I saw it.
Similarly, Fritz Lang's 'Clash by Night' I used to think was one of his minor films. My appreciation has grown enormously for it.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 10, 2012 6:06:28 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 10, 2012 6:07:11 PM PST
Richard Williams spent over 25 years developing The Thief and The Cobbler. I still don't have respect for it, because it was a bad film.

But if there is any film that gained my respect that I was indifferent about at first, the most recent example would have to be Sleeping Beauty. I hated it the first time I saw it, but then after hearing many people praise it for reasons I saw in my second viewing, it's now one of my favorite animated films.

Posted on Nov 11, 2012 12:45:13 AM PST
Balok says:
I've mentioned this one before in other contexts, I think, but it's perhaps worth mentioning again if it inspires even one person to see the movie. The first time that I saw _Something to Sing About_, when Philip Ahn first appeared, I expected that I would have to spend the rest of the movie in full cringe mode. But the surprisingly positive way in which his character is treated (especially considering when the film was made), and the way in which our understanding of the character is turned on its head, made me respect the movie even more than just as a vehicle for Cagney's dancing.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 11, 2012 10:53:00 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 11, 2012 10:54:16 AM PST
Not the analogy I was looking for. Aside from the lackluster in the writing I'm just saying how incredible it was watching the production crew put so much work into a shot. Not to mention everything else that was done to prepare for a specific shot. I'm sure even bad films had a lot of work put into them, which is a shame. Guess I should've been a little clearer.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 11, 2012 3:44:46 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 11, 2012 3:46:52 PM PST
J. Baker says:
You said clearly enough in the subject line "*Films* That Gained Your Respect", not *Production Crews* That Gained Your Respect.

It may not be the analogy you were looking for, but it's the one you probably deserved.

>"Guess I should've been a little clearer."<

Yeah, I guess so. What's the purpose of this thread again? Was it to give every movie that had a crew that worked arduously and diligently a proverbial Participation Ribbon?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 9:19:05 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 12, 2012 9:20:14 AM PST
Umm....... no. It's about an aspect in a film that may have gained your respect. The Matrix films (in the production aspect) gained my respect. Certain films have my respect for different reasons. Geez! Snooty much?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 3:30:43 PM PST
J. Baker says:
Funny, I thought the "Not the analogy I was looking for" was you being snotty. Perhaps we both misread each other's posts a bit.

I still maintain that my analogy was apt: are we respecting a staff in the kitchen based on how long it took them to prepare a feast, with no attention paid to what it tastes like? If the sequels to 'The Matrix' are essentially convoluted flavorless gruel, what does it matter how they were prepared?

I'd like to see all interesting thread succeed. I didn't even know if I was answering the question correctly given the way it was asked.
You may not believe it: I was only trying to help, sarcasm aside.

Posted on Nov 12, 2012 4:00:19 PM PST
The Shining-I was bored to death the first time I saw this movie. I watched again a few months ago and really liked it.

Deliverance-Watching it recently I was again reminded how great a movie it is.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 4:21:55 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 12, 2012 4:42:25 PM PST
I find that I have more respect for a lot of movies and appreciate them even more when I watch the behind the scenes footage and making of featurettes, and also when I listen to the commentaries on the making of the features. The most recent movies I can think of that really impressed me were the Marvel movies like Thor, Captain America, and The Avengers and what it took to bring these characters and stories to life. When you see the work put into the sets and costumes and things it really amazes you with how talented these people are.

And also the effort that actors such as Chris Evans and Chris Hemsworth put into their characters. Evans did most of his stunts in the CA movie, which is pretty impressive when you watch what he does in that movie. He worked out a lot too to bulk-up and the director Joe Johnston said that a lot of people assumed that the scene when Steve Rogers first becomes super after the success of the super-soldier experiment that it was all a CGI body effect and Joe laughed and replied, No, that's really Chris Evans.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 10:54:57 PM PST
Balok says:
@JB-UCC:

> If the sequels to 'The Matrix' are essentially convoluted flavorless gruel, what does it matter how
> they were prepared?

When the subject of _The Matrix_ and its sequels comes up, "flavorless gruel" is not the image that comes to mind, but rather the image of a substance that is not normally eaten at all unless you're in a movie being directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini or John Waters.

Posted on Nov 13, 2012 11:22:47 AM PST
Another film that comes to mind is 'Good Will Hunting'. A movie where it shows that even the most gifted person growing up in the worst of circumstances can be afraid of success. Not to mention it has some really good acting. It's one of the many movies I respect for being so believable.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


ARRAY(0xa57cd780)
 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  6
Total posts:  12
Initial post:  Nov 10, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 13, 2012

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 1 customer

Search Customer Discussions