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Movies that did NOT age well...


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Initial post: Jun 13, 2012 2:37:31 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 13, 2012 2:56:31 PM PDT
D. Duarte says:
How many times have you seen a movie that you loved, admired or appreciated, only to revisit it years later and wonder, "What the hell was I thinking????"

(I have a theory on this phenomena, btw...)

Posted on Jun 13, 2012 2:39:44 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 13, 2012 5:56:37 PM PDT
D. Duarte says:
When I first saw (best picture winner) "Ordinary People," I thought it was a really "out there" heartfelt movie.

But then when I watched it again in '05, I wondered, WTF, this movie is obvious, cliched, and a little shallow.

Posted on Jun 13, 2012 5:20:12 PM PDT
C. J. Vasta says:
I think you mean Ordinary People. Real People was an early 1980s NBC reality series that spotlighted people that were odd or unusual in someway.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 5:56:51 PM PDT
D. Duarte says:
thanks, you're right.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 6:55:26 PM PDT
stevign says:
I thought the movie "Ordinary People" was rather....ordinary, I saw no reason for all the accolades.

Posted on Jun 13, 2012 6:58:50 PM PDT
stevign says:
"Easy Rider" was a joke when it first came out and holds up even less now.

Posted on Jun 13, 2012 7:20:52 PM PDT
Mike Gordan says:
Okay, one big one that I felt aged rather badly over time was Gladiator. Frankly, the more I see it, the less interesting it became. It is probably the blandest of all of Ridley Scott's films which usually range from either being mundane and pretentious to intellectually deep and atmospheric (Blade Runner and Matchstick Men). 1492, G.I. Jane and Body of Lies are among the only films he's directed so far that I could consider genuinely bad, however.

And frankly, I rather liked Ordinary People. Yeah, it's cliched, but it's also honest, realistic, and an overall sympathetic movie about the post effects of suicide and its impact on a family at hand. I wouldn't go so far as to say that it deserved Best Picture; personally, I would have picked Raging Bull. Or Kagemusha. Or even Empire's Strikes Back. But it's a solid top 10 for me.

And Easy Rider can be summed up as a time capsule film; it is a film about the period of time it's set in (specifically, the time period in which the film was made in), so obviously, it's not going to become a timeless classic. But it remains an interesting--albeit strange and surreal period piece nonetheless.

Films that do not hold up at all, either as time capsules or otherwise, are the majority of the Best Picture race of 1967. I'l admit that The Graduate is the closest thing to timeless from that year's selection, but In the Heat of the Night, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, Bonnie and Clyde, and Doctor Dolittle all possess obvious civil right subtext, with the former two being painstakingly obvious that they become flatout preachy (but I guess that goes to show with two films that hammer in that they are about the race movement from back then).

And finally, most kids films in general. Even in the case of the good ones, most of them do not hold up very well upon growing up and revisiting them. The Aristocats, for instance, is such a lightweight, braindead premise that it surprises me that Disney even approved of its development before his death. The Rescuers not only is stuck in the 1970's both in tone and in storytelling, but it's also cloyingly sentimental that it's enough to make me want to vomit. American Tale is also cloyingly sentimental, but it's also rushed and in a constant hurry to the finish line (also, the songs in that movie flatout suck). And while we're at it, so is The Land Before Time, which is pretentious, hacked to pieces, and oozing with the most disgusting sentimentality imaginable; in all three of these Don Bluth movies, we are manipulating into sympathizing with these characters without giving us a single reason to legitamitely care.

And since I'm done with cartoons for the time being, what about the live-action stuff? Both Big and The Wizard of Oz are unbelievably creepy to look at, and in the case of the latter, it's because we have an obvious 16-year old pretending she's 8 years old, and she's dancing and singing around with a trio of pedophilic cosplayers who think they're mentally impaired scarecrows, an emotionless robot, and a lion with some really disturbing security issues. And the villain is really just a school teacher with green skin. Thief of Bagdad's effects now may not hold up, but at least the writing remains first rate to this day.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 7:27:13 PM PDT
stevign says:
re: "(The Wizard of Oz) an obvious 16-year old pretending she's 8 years old, and she's dancing and singing around with a trio of pedophilic cosplayers who think they're mentally impaired scarecrows, an emotionless robot, and a lion with some really disturbing security issues. And the villain is really just a school teacher with green skin."

lolol.....Wow, you really "do" have personal issues. ;~)

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 7:30:21 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 13, 2012 7:41:23 PM PDT
Mike Gordan says:
stevign: Nah, if I ever decide to sit down and watch The Wizard of Oz again, I would like to pretend it's some kind of B-Grade Snuff film and laugh at it. Because even as a child, I never really cared for the movie. But now, only if I get to insert as many innuendos as humanly possible...or if I watch it as The Dark Side of the Rainbow (which, btw, works).

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 7:37:19 PM PDT
stevign says:
Easy Rider was ludicrous to say the least. Once again Hollywood, Peter Fonda, Dennis Hopper and Terry Southern showed just how little they knew about Hippies and what they were about. As a Hippie of that era we did enjoy the soundtrack of course but the movie was just plain dumb and way off base.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 7:38:52 PM PDT
stevign says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 7:43:35 PM PDT
Mike Gordan says:
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Posted on Jun 13, 2012 8:02:30 PM PDT
AndrewA says:
Pretty much every movie that relies on CGI and is at least 3 to 4 years old just look terrible these days.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 8:14:19 PM PDT
Jon Patrick says:
>AndrewA says:
Pretty much every movie that relies on CGI and is at least 3 to 4 years old just look terrible these days."<

What do you mean by "relies on CGI"? How much so?

One movie that was made in 1999, called Vertical Limit, actually holds up fairly well. And it definitely relies on CGI.

The spaceships in 'Independence Day' and the tornadoes in 'Twister' are still the best things about those movies, and they're like 16 years old now.

It's not really an age thing, so much as a budget thing.
Although personally, I thought Jackson's 'King Kong' looked awful, laughable then, and even worse today. Much worse that the stop-motion of old, or even the monkey suit 'Kong' of the 'Seventies.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 8:21:37 PM PDT
AndrewA says:
There are always exceptions to the rule.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 8:29:03 PM PDT
Jon Patrick says:
Yeah, of course, but what are your most hideous examples of CGI-dependent movies gone wrong, from a few years past or more?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 8:32:28 PM PDT
AndrewA says:
Personally, I think the matrix sequels and the spiderman movies, which were revolutionary at the time, look pretty bad these days.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 8:48:36 PM PDT
Jon Patrick says:
Yeah, 'Matrix' without a doubt. Earlier this year I was looking at this cheapo show 'The Dead Zone', which was made several years after the first 'Matrix', and even they had better looking effects in the same vein.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 8:56:14 PM PDT
AndrewA says:
A lot of the older superhero movies just look like video games anymore.

Posted on Jun 13, 2012 8:57:15 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 13, 2012 8:57:29 PM PDT
In the 70's I thought "Logan's Run" was a great sci-fi movie. Now it seems stupid and lame.

Posted on Jun 13, 2012 9:35:50 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 26, 2012 9:19:54 PM PDT
MarcTheKing says:
In defense of "Easy Rider," if you didn't believe in the ideas in the first place, you ain't gonna like it 43 years later.

"Easy Rider" had the fashion, soundtrack, and storyline that was just right for its time. Two guys, trying to "make it", and failing because they fell into the mindset that the big payoff was gonna make everything alright, man. They blew it, alright, and their journey across the country showed in great detail how fragile some of the anti-capitalist ideals and 60's hedonism were.
It was no pie-in-the sky hippie fantasy movie. The grim realities of living and dying by the land were shown in fantastic detail during the commune scenes. Those were real commune dwellers, trying to make it (and failing). That alone highlighted how hard it is for farmers and what we would look like if we didn't have them working the earth, dirt under thier fingers while the rest of us sit cozy behind our computers. Hopper didn't shy away from the flimsy dream that the 60's were striving for-- how long did that "Free Store" in Haight Ashbury last anyhow? I would say that "Easy Rider" made the hippie dream look pretty durn bleak.
It had alot to say about individualism and doing your own thing, and how hard it was to be a truly free person. "Easy Rider" lays down some truth.

George Hanson: You know, this used to be a helluva good country. I can't understand what's gone wrong with it.
Billy: Man, everybody got chicken, that's what happened. Hey, we can't even get into like, a second-rate hotel, I mean, a second-rate motel, you dig? They think we're gonna cut their throat or somethin'. They're scared, man.
George Hanson: They're not scared of you. They're scared of what you represent to 'em.
Billy: Hey, man. All we represent to them, man, is somebody who needs a haircut.
George Hanson: Oh, no. What you represent to them is freedom.
Billy: What the hell is wrong with freedom? That's what it's all about.
George Hanson: Oh, yeah, that's right. That's what's it's all about, all right. But talkin' about it and bein' it, that's two different things. I mean, it's real hard to be free when you are bought and sold in the marketplace. Of course, don't ever tell anybody that they're not free, 'cause then they're gonna get real busy killin' and maimin' to prove to you that they are. Oh, yeah, they're gonna talk to you, and talk to you, and talk to you about individual freedom. But they see a free individual, it's gonna scare 'em.

That line said by Nicholson was the highlight and centerpiece of the whole film. And how does he end up? Head bashed in by gun-wielding rednecks. Truth is, Hanson's death and the ultimate death of Billy and Captain America made it clear to most in America that our country wasn't quite ready for what they represented.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 10:09:29 PM PDT
stevign says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 10:17:24 PM PDT
There are movies that are just very specific to the time period. Try watching an old Simpson's episode. Funny as they were when they were new episodes, they've lost some relevance moving forward though I still find the new episodes funny at times. But, then there are movies which while specific to the time period during which they were released still hold some sentimental value when viewed again. That largely depends on where you were with your life and what you were feeling when you saw them. Any movie that relied on special effects to sell it pretty much sucks a decade later.
I couldn't figure out what the fuss was about when the Matrix was released, it's even more loathsome now.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 10:20:55 PM PDT
stevign says:
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Posted on Jun 13, 2012 10:28:21 PM PDT
here's a couple dated movies but they're still good ones i've loved since childhood:

Iron Eagle
Iron Eagle II
Aces: Iron Eagle III
Top Gun
First Blood
Rambo: First Blood Part II
Rambo III
Red Dawn

what dated these movies was either mentioning the year or the current President or had the heroes in the movies fighting the Soviets or the fact that it was peacetime instead of the Iraq War II or the Afghan War
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Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  80
Total posts:  738
Initial post:  Jun 13, 2012
Latest post:  Jan 29, 2013

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