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Agree Or Disagree


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Showing 126-150 of 509 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Nov 4, 2012 10:06:19 PM PST
RE: Americans are an unholy sight by and large

Ouch...

Agree:

Statement: Hollywood needs to start making horror movies like Halloween and Friday the 13th again

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 4, 2012 10:20:02 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 4, 2012 10:21:25 PM PST
Agree as long as you mean more original horror, and not remakes of the same slasher movies ad infinitum.

Statement: I don't have any idea what happened to David Blaine (did he disappear himself?) and I frankly don't care.

For those who need special help in knowing who Blaine is:
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0086145/

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 4, 2012 10:26:42 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 4, 2012 10:50:46 PM PST
Definitely original horror movies.

I think David Blaine realized he was irrelevant and jumped out of a plane without a chute.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 6:05:50 AM PST
Larry Kelley says:
JB: Disagree. Not about the violence--but I hate that dratted commercial with the bow chica bow wow!!
Statement: Jack Lemmon was a gift to film watchers

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 7:35:13 AM PST
Kevin Beirne says:
Agree: Glengary Glen Ross was nothing short of incredible on the part of Jack Lemmon.

Statement: Sin City is one of the coolest, most unique, well written films that has been released in a long time.

Posted on Nov 5, 2012 7:44:45 AM PST
ozier23 says:
Agree: I love anything Frank Miller does and grew up late 70's and 80's buying all his Batman and Daredevil work. Acting is on par as well in the movie.

Statement: A Time to Kill is the best John Grisham adaptation...Runaway Jury a close second

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 9:54:37 AM PST
Disagree with that. I'm not Grisham fan, and those are actually my least favorites I've seen from his books; for the best movies made from his work, I've got to go with 'The Gingerbread Man' and 'The Pelican Brief'.

Statement: the best Elmore Leonard adaptation to the movies so far is still '3:10 to Yuma', but 'Jackie Brown''s a close second.

Posted on Nov 5, 2012 9:56:57 AM PST
As an aside - I notice that IMDb's listing of "Untitled Elmore Leonard Project (2013)" shows that Mos Def will play Ordell Robbie, the character from Rum Punch that Samuel L. Jackson played. John Hawkes will also be in that.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 9:59:39 AM PST
AJA says:
Disagree: While I think both those movies you mentioned are pretty good, Hombre would be my choice for the best Leonard adaptation thus far.

Statement: If there were a Mt. Rushmore of film composers, Maurice Jarre would be one of the four.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 10:07:04 AM PST
Agreed.

Statement: If there was a basement of film composers, James Horner would be the president.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 10:12:49 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Nov 5, 2012 10:13:05 AM PST]

Posted on Nov 5, 2012 10:22:36 AM PST
ozier23 says:
Agreed, although Hans Zimmer is travelling down those steps but im no expert.

Statement: The most underrated/underappreciated Quentin Tarantino movie is True Romance. Great cast even with Slater, and the writing is outta this world. The scene with Hopper and Walken in the trailer is ridiculously good

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 10:25:58 AM PST
Agree, but I like his 'Search for Spock' and a couple others. It's not all dross.

Statement: after recently re-seeing 'Sunset Blvd.' it struck me at how integral and moving the Franz Waxman score was. In such an outstanding movie in every regard, that score is the greatest of its achievements.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 10:27:32 AM PST
Oops.
Disagree. I think the most underrated is 'Jackie Brown', followed by the short in 'Four Rooms'.

Statement: after recently re-seeing 'Sunset Blvd.' it struck me at how integral and moving the Franz Waxman score was. In such an outstanding movie in every regard, that score is the greatest of its achievements.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 11:56:48 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 5, 2012 12:04:10 PM PST
Hikari says:
@Bakyr & Ozier
Re. Grisham movies
No love for "The Firm"? I'd have to choose that as my tops. Even with Cruise in the lead--actually, this one is one of a handful of Cruise perfomances where he was perfect for the role. The supporting cast is all fantastic, and Sydney Pollack's pacing is masterful. Dave Grusin's score functions as a character all on its own. In my opinion, it's a rare movie that actually elevates the source material it came from--it's a better movie than it was a book. I enjoyed the book immensely & Pollack and team exceeded my expectations for the screen treatment. I would make one change--never liked Jeanne Tripplehorn as Abby, but that's my only quibble.
-----
The Gingerbread Man had the vast entertainment value (for me) of Kenneth Branagh doing a Yank accent. The movie was kind of opaque but I haven't read the book to render judgement. Actually was not aware that was a Grisham.

"A Time to Kill" is very good, indeed. Matthew McConauhey was super. What a shame he went for the brainless rom-com track after this. He gives me hives.
----
The movie version of "The Pelican Brief" was the hugest disappointment for me of any Grisham-based project. I loved the book and thought it had a great deal more complexity than 'The Firm', with an intelligent heroine I could really root for. Sadly, they cast Julia Roberts as Darby and completely ruined the film, despite manful efforts from Denzel Washington & a touching bit part for Sam Shepard. Julia was a huge breakout star at the time and casting her made sense from a box office point of view, but she sucked the air right of of the whole thing. I will apply an aphorism from the William A. Smith school of film critique here: An intelligent actor can play dumb for a role and succeed, but there is no way a dumb actor can convincingly play smarter than he/she is. Darby Shaw is supposed to be the top student at Tulane Law School, so bright that she has astounded all her professors. Her smarts are an integral part of this character. Julia graduated from high school in Smyrna, Georgia, and that's the sum total of her educational attainment. She was in way over her head, both playing a brilliant legal student and acting opposite Denzel. It's not her lack of an actual legal degree that bothers me, and going to college doesn't automatically make one 'smart'. But Julia built her early career on playing blue-collar tramps, and even her later career . . What is 'Erin Brockovich' but Vivian Ward 2.0, really? The real Erin Brockovich is an extremely intelligent woman but I didn't get that from Julia's rendering of her, just of someone who was inordinately proud of her lingerie collection,
-----
I enjoyed "The Runaway Jury" as a novel, but consider it one of Grisham's lesser efforts. Didn't bond particularly with the protaganist-hero in this book, played by John Cusack in the movie. They fiddled around with a major plot point from book to screen in order to make it seem more 'relevant', but it just wasn't that compelling to me. Cusack was fine but he didn't have much to work with and frankly I don't remember a thing about the film itself. I'd rate "The Rainmaker" with Damon higher.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 12:07:34 PM PST
ozier: Zimmer is often quite redundant in many of his scores. Only a few of his scores are gold.

Jon: Agreed.

Statement: Waxman deserves as much recognition that Max Steiner gets.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 5, 2012 2:52:00 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 5, 2012 4:48:10 PM PST
ozier23 says:
@Hikari
I actually didnt care too much for Runaway Jury as a book and liked the movie more which is very rare for me. They did change a few elements but I liked Cusack and Rachel Weisz was great as his sister, she is a fine actress. The Firm was good but I agree that Tripplehorn was completely miscast. Not a McConaughey fan either but rumor is he did his closing statement from the trial in just one take which blew me away, and Donald Sutherland was perfectly cast as Lucion (sorry if I misspelled).

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 1:46:02 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 7, 2012 1:46:43 AM PST
Agree of course; hell, I think he deserves more credit than Steiner if anything.

Statement: There has never been an American thriller to deal with a real modern political scandal with as much intelligence, verve and entertainment value as 'All the President's Men', not before 1976, and certainly not since.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 6:41:23 AM PST
Balok says:
@UCC:

> There has never been an American thriller to deal with a real modern political scandal with as much
> intelligence, verve and entertainment value as 'All the President's Men', not before 1976, and certainly
> not since.

Disagree. _All the King's Men_ is just as good (and features Mercedes McCambridge in the role she was born to play) and if it's somewhat Bowdlerized from the book, it still makes its point pretty well.

Statment: _Miracle in Milan_ is as good as, if not better than, de Sica's more famous neo-Realist films of that period (_Shoeshine_, _Bicycle Thieves_, _Umberto D._).

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 3:23:43 PM PST
Disagree. I never liked 'Miracle in Milan' as much as the other de Sica films from the '40s-50s. Although I like it more than 'La Strada', oddly enough, which is the first Fellini that received more praise than I thought it deserved.

P. S. - I deserve ten thousand lashes because I saw the remake of 'All the King's Men' but still not the original!

Statement: Mercedes McCambridge's vocal work in 'The Exorcist' was the best thing about that movie, and by all rights should not have been overshadowed by Linda Blair's revolting "performance". To make my opinion even less agreeable: Owen Roizman's photography was the second best thing, and Ellen Burstyn was the third best thing in the original 'Exorcist'. And to make sure no one else agrees: 'Exorcist II: The Heretic' was a much superior movie in every way.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 3:26:58 PM PST
Agree.

Statement

Horror movies will never be what they were in the 70's and 80's and early 90's.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 4:20:39 PM PST
Wait... REALLY?!?
This may be the first time anyone agreed with me real-time with the assertion that 'The Heretic' is better than Friedkin's first 'Exorcist'!

If you just agreed with the first part, about McCambridge's demonic vocalizations, that's understandable.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 4:24:39 PM PST
Meatwad says:
Kinda agree, though you do end up with gems like REC, 28 Days Later, The Orphanage and Sinister.

Statement: Willem Dafoe as the Green Goblin is a beautiful thing.

Posted on Nov 7, 2012 4:28:18 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 7, 2012 4:31:40 PM PST
Disagree about the horror movies comment. It's vague, but I've seen a few "throw back" horror films that are as good as anything since the '60s, mainly from Asia, but still.

Now, if you specified Hollywood horror. . .
I was LATE!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 4:31:04 PM PST
Scratch the last one...

Disagree: Dafoe is a great actor but that was a ludicrous character and not convincingly performed.

Statement: Alfred Molina's Doctor Octopus was the most sympathetic and interesting villain in modern superhero films.
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Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  26
Total posts:  509
Initial post:  Oct 30, 2012
Latest post:  Jan 7, 2013

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