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Agree Or Disagree


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Showing 151-175 of 509 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 5:05:38 PM PST
I agreed with all of it. especially you're saying "Mercedes McCambridge's vocal work in 'The Exorcist' was the best thing about that movie" I believe the rest of the film, though good, was overrated. I also agree with your view on the sequel. It's been a while since I've seen it, but I remember it having a much more sinister tone, and overall better acting.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 5:55:59 PM PST
Disagree: I sympathized more with the Penguin and Catwoman in Batman Returns, the Phantasm in Batman: Mask of the Phantasm, and Samuel L. Jackson in Unbreakable.

Statement: Argo was a well-made thriller about the Iran Hostage Crisis.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 6:11:16 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 7, 2012 6:13:14 PM PST
J. Baker says:
Haven't seen 'Argo' yet.
But I have to object to your personal opinion on at least one of those supervillains and here's why!... I like Samuel L. Jackson in 'Unbreakable', but he wasn't very sympathetic. Bit of a complainer and do-nothing. 'Ohh, they call me Mr. Glass' and 'Ow, my bones are always breaking'. So he reads comic books all his childhood and identifies with the villains and decided to do evil. Kind of like that `Joker` in Colorado. Too much effort to read real literature or do something worthwhile, so he takes the path of lesser resistance, like the coward he is.

Please... Dr. Oc was a great scientist, a humanitarian, and a victim of circumstance that went far beyond the quirk of fate that Mr. Glass was dealt in life. And Alfred Molina is inherently more sympathetic in every way as an actor.
This isn't just my opinion talking now, that's science.
So basically, my opinion is right, and yours is less right. Although it might be more right for you. And my opinion less right for you. Science wins.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 6:27:18 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 7, 2012 6:37:42 PM PST
Oz le Fou says:
When Burton first tackled Batman, he had hoped to make a film about depression and lack of integration. Eventually, the studios butchered the initial script, and he lost control of the film. By Part 2, he was able to maintain control, finally able to tackle his intended themes the way he wanted to. This lack of integration theme is clear in The Penguin, but I still couldn't sympathize for some reason. I found myself sympathizing more with Batman himself than the out of control characters around him.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 8:30:54 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 7, 2012 8:33:15 PM PST
J. Baker says:
About The Penguin, same here. And I like Danny DeVito. He was more sympathetic as the laughing stalk letch actor in 'Get Shorty'.

I never had any sympathy for Michelle Pfeiffer. She's as cold as ice to me.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 10:02:14 PM PST
Balok says:
@UCC:

> I never had any sympathy for Michelle Pfeiffer. She's as cold as ice to me.

Agree.

Statement: _Blue Velvet_ was the greatest film of the 1980's.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 11:01:40 PM PST
J. Baker says:
Agree to disagree! Well, you know between us that's like if I stated that 'Marienbad' is the greatest of the '60s. I think we could both make convincing arguments that sound convincing to ourselves at least, if not to the other.
Objectively, I'd say it was the greatest art house event movie of the '80s, and that's not to say I think that's good. In fact I think John Waters did a much better job of skewering suburban American in movies like 'Serial Mom'.

Umm... STATEMENT: 'Fargo' is the greatest film of the 1990s.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 11:04:37 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 7, 2012 11:04:47 PM PST
Agreed.

Statement: The movie 'Carrie' should not have gotten a remake as the classic is just that... a classic.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 11:10:10 PM PST
Oz le Fou says:
Agree on the remake front - why not just re-market the original? Disagree on the 'classic" front. It's a good pic, no doubt, but not a classic (others may disagree, or agree, or disagree.....).

Statement: Luis Buñuel's 'Death in the Garden' is a better film than the IMDb ranking of 7/10 suggests.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012 11:16:11 PM PST
J. Baker says:
Agree. But my only giving it a 8/10 is no reflection of thinking it's not a classic. I tend to rate much lower than most do on sites like that.
My "3/10" means I liked it more than most peoples "5/10".
An 8 to me is a near-great film.

Statement: Most classic films are rated far too low on IMDb!!!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 7:04:44 AM PST
Agree.

Statement: The IMDB Top 250 is ridiculous.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 8:05:50 AM PST
C. J. Vasta says:
I'll disagree the worst part is clearly at the top but this democratically organized of top-rated provides of better mix of overlooked films than many especially when we get to around to the 200 range.

STATEMENT: The Sight and Sound list is incredibly overrated and should not be one's guide to what the best films are.

Posted on Nov 8, 2012 8:44:16 AM PST
B-Jak says:
Agree, especially considering I have no familiarity with S and S at all. I'll trust my own judgement concerning which films are best.

Incredibly, the First two casts of Saturday Night Live have produced two of the best, most versatile actors in Bill Murray and Dan Akroyd.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 8:50:41 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 8, 2012 8:56:05 AM PST
Y>Y says:
Agree. Love Bill Murray and Dan Akroyd.
Way back somewhere there's a post about Meryl Streep being not beautiful, or being overlooked in the beauty stakes, something.
I disagree. I think she is beautiful and I agree that she is a very fine actress indeed. Two of my favourite films ever are The Devil Wears Prada, and It's Complicated. I also love Mamma Mia just 'cos it's such a fun uplifting film.

Going back to the beauty issue, isn't it true that beauty is in the eye of the beholder?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 9:26:46 AM PST
Kevin Beirne says:
Agree. My brother and I got in an argument about who is hotter, "Monsters Ball" Halle Barry, or "Wild Things" Denise Richards. The scene between Halle and Billy Bob was his justification that she is a stark raving hotty. My justification was when Denise Richards walks into the house of her guidance counselor after washing his jeep and she is soaked to the bone, she was basically white hot fire.

We learned that is pointless to argue about something like that - as beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Statement: The Usual Suspects is the best film of the 90's.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 9:48:17 AM PST
Disagree.
In my opinion, and I'm sure I'm not the only one. But I feel that The Matrix was the best film of the 90's

Statement: The Matrix sequels should have been darker and grittier, and way more than high action popcorn flicks.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 10:57:18 AM PST
Disagree. I'm not sure why The Matrix even got sequels. I feel it's overrated to begin with. Good, but overrated.

Statement: Apocalypse Now was the best film of the 1970s.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 1:34:30 PM PST
AJA says:
Disagree: The film has some terrific well crafted individual scenes, but I think it begins to run out of steam when Willard finally meets Kurtz. The 1970's produced a number of great films, but I don't think Apocalypse Now was one of them.

Now, my turn to get hammered.

Statement: Jaws is the best film of the 1970's.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 2:17:15 PM PST
J. Baker says:
>Re: IMDb Top 250, C. J. Vasta said: "..this democratically organized of top-rated provides of better mix of overlooked films than many especially when we get to around to the 200 range."<

I'm compelled to point out that it's not much of a "democracy" when the majority of IMDb users don't vote, but a horde of teenagers and other petty fanboys start multiple accounts to give 10/10 ratings to their favorite dumb action movies and score 1/10 to any classic films that they see are in danger of knocking the Nolan's and Cameron's off their artificial pedestals.

The notion that IMDb represents democracy and Sight and Sound an elitist tyranny was just too much silliness to take.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 2:21:17 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 8, 2012 2:26:27 PM PST
J. Baker says:
Disagree. It may be Spielberg's best, but in no way is 'Jaws' the best movie of the '70s. Best shark attack movie, no doubt.

Statement: 'Ulzana's Raid' is the best Western of the 1970s and since.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 5:49:06 PM PST
Larry Kelley says:
Disagree: "Ulzana's Raid" was a good movie, but not the best in the 70's. "Jeremiah Johnson" while not exactly a western, is close. And it is better.
Statement: The Wild Bunch is the best western ever.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 5:50:35 PM PST
Oz le Fou says:
Disagree. Based entirely on my following statement...

Statement: There is no scientific way to decide which film is the best.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 5:53:05 PM PST
Agree.

Statement.

The Swedish Version of The girl with the Dragon tattoo was far better than the American version, which in its own right, was pretty dang good.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 5:58:28 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 8, 2012 6:04:07 PM PST
J. Baker says:
Disagree. I disliked both, but Fincher's was less masochistic, and had superior plotting and editing.

Statement: I see nothing wrong in principle with having remakes of foreign movies. If it helps bring a larger audience to the story, and possibly introduce more fans to both versions, there's no harm in it.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 8, 2012 6:13:59 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 8, 2012 6:15:48 PM PST
Hikari says:
After Baekyr
--------------
In principle, I agree. So long as the remake is not a blatant money grab for American dollars and/or a not-so-subtle jackhammering home about the superiority of 'the Hollywood way' or the English language in general over all others. I've actually come around to appreciating Fincher's effort, but the above were my initial concerns about his project. Usually a decent interval of more than one year is usually observed before the remake moves in. But in this case I know they were striking while the iron was hot and all their actors were both the appropriate age and available.

STATEMENT: Actually more of a question, I guess. Q: Should we as Americans be concerned that all of our top indigenous superheroes are now being embodied by Englishmen? Spiderman: Andrew Garfield (British) Batman: Christian Bale (British) and now Superman: Henry Cavill (British). It's the second British Invasion!

Actually I don't care about Superhero movies and was just being provocative. I didn't think my original statement would get any traction. But you have to admit that it's a trend that gives you pause.
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Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  26
Total posts:  509
Initial post:  Oct 30, 2012
Latest post:  Jan 7, 2013

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