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Lincoln


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Showing 1-25 of 28 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 9, 2012 1:24:27 PM PST
KinksRock says:
I can't even express enough how badly I want to see this film.

Posted on Nov 10, 2012 4:44:07 AM PST
A Customer says:
I want to see it too. The trailer looks good.

Posted on Nov 10, 2012 4:44:07 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Nov 10, 2012 4:44:22 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 10, 2012 10:41:57 AM PST
Hikari says:
@Kinks
Me, too. But "Skyfall" first. :)

It is not long odds at all that Mr. Day-Lewis will pick up his third Best Actor trophy come February, is it? Sight unseen, I think he will steamroll to victory. Who else in the field can remotely compare? A hobbit? I hardly think so.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 10, 2012 12:07:29 PM PST
C. J. Vasta says:
If Martin Freeman was a serious contender, he would be hobbled by the fact we know he's going to be in two more films, Just as Fellowship of the King was.

Posted on Nov 10, 2012 12:22:03 PM PST
Mickey Ryan says:
KinksRock ~ I feel exactly the same way. Want to see it bad, most likely will go next week sometime.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 10, 2012 12:25:20 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 10, 2012 12:30:07 PM PST
Hikari says:
True, C.J.,
So maybe we can look for Mr. Freeman on the awards podium in . . .2015.

Frankly, 3 movies out of a children's book is overkill on the part of Mr. Jackson. But he needed an excuse to reassemble more of his LOTR cast--Galadriel and the elves do not actually appear in this book. Tom Bombadil does. Gandalf appears but briefly, at the beginning, to hand Bilbo over to the dwarves.

Martin Freeman is a wonderful and until now, rather underrated actor. Americans that don't watch public television, British comedy or arty films like "Nightwatching" will just be discovering him for the very first time, though he has been a working actor, and one of Britain's leading comic actors for about 15 years at least. I'm glad he's going to become a huge star in America in a few weeks' time. I expect the Hobbit trilogy will pick up a slew of technical awards (sound, makeup, production design, music, to name some) but I really don't expect it to contend for acting honors. A children's fantasy might be deemed too frivolous for that. It will put Martin on the radar though in a big way. Sherlock co-star and pal Benedict Cumberbatch has already appeared on American movie screens with roles in two big movies last Christmas season--War Horse & Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy--and will appear next summer in the next Star Trek. But Martin will eclipse him handily with the lead in this Jackson extravaganza, ably assisted by some other British luminaries as the dwarf contingent. On behalf of the much put-upon Dr. John Watson, I say "Jolly well done."

In 2003, Martin had a role in the ensemble rom-com Love, Actually, playing one-half of the nude stand-in couple making a porno film. So Americans have seen a bit more of Mr. Freeman than they may have realized. :)

Posted on Nov 10, 2012 2:17:54 PM PST
Who wouldve guessed that Lincoln was a vampire slayer? Never heard that when I was growing up.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 10, 2012 3:34:35 PM PST
Hikari says:
This confirms what I've thought all along--Abraham Lincoln: American President and Superhero!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 10, 2012 4:22:38 PM PST
C. J. Vasta says:
Tom Bombadil is not in the Hobbit. That's a similar nature character. (Just as people often think Harry Mudd was the one selling Tribbles.) This was one was a bit more action-oriented than Tom Bobadil. He is revealed to have single-handedly turned the tide in the Battle of Five Armies.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 10, 2012 4:27:34 PM PST
Hikari says:
Oh. I thought he was. I have a feeling he's going to make an appearance anyways, just like the elves.

For anybody who's curious about the Hobbit, I beg you to check out our Bilbo Baggins in the BBC Sherlock as Dr. Watson. Yes, Martin Freeman was born to play Bilbo and that is obvious as soon as you look at him. But he is one of the very finest Watsons we have ever had. Please, please watch it!!

Posted on Nov 19, 2012 7:21:55 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 19, 2012 7:22:57 AM PST
Kevin Beirne says:
Daniel Day-Lewis was, as expected, fantastic in "Lincoln". If you go by the astonishing acheivement of how they got the likeness so close (to well known photos of Lincoln himself), that point alone makes the film a must see. Now if you add on Lewis' protrayal of the famous President, it makes for a very safe bet for Best Actor. After There Will Be Blood my respect and awe for Daniel Day-Lewis's acting abilities were not only totally realized, but grew to inconceivable proportions. I have since seen him in "The Crucible", which he very much puts on a fine performance.

Coming from someone who is pretty much floored by Lewis' "Daniel Plainview", in There Will Be Blood, he definitely managed to pull off another incredilbe feat with "Lincoln". His posturing, dialect, mannerisms, it is really something to see.

I very much enjoyed the film, I suspect you would as well. I am anxious to hear what other folks thought of it. There were several fine performances put on. Tommy Lee-Jones was quite good in it as well, to say the least. Many appearances by well known actors donned in 1860's side burns and suits. All together it is an incredible film.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 7:32:02 AM PST
KinksRock says:
I have not seen it yet. Is Seward given an appropriate amount of screen time? He was, after all, perhaps the most important figure in the Cabinet.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 19, 2012 8:24:29 AM PST
Kevin Beirne says:
Seward is indeed given an appropriate amount of screen time.

Posted on Nov 20, 2012 7:55:45 AM PST
C. J. Vasta says:
Based on Alphas, Straitharn should be prettygood casting for Seward.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 12:24:44 PM PST
Hikari says:
Time for David to win an Oscar, methinks. He was nominated, I believe, for his Edward R. Murrow in "Good Night and Good Luck".

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 1:04:45 PM PST
KinksRock says:
The more I read about Lincoln, the more I wish I could go back in time and throw my body over him to block Booth's bullet. If only we could know how a second term would have gone. Certainly better than the (Andrew) Johnson presidency.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 2:18:53 PM PST
Hikari says:
Lincoln suffered from several maladies that might have done him in eventually, including the condition that gave him his unique facial features & severe, at times incapacitating depression. Of course presiding over a civil war and losing 3 of your 4 children before adulthood would make anybody prone to depression.

Lincoln lingered in a coma for nearly a day after he was shot. Doctors marvelled at his strength because it was thought the wound would have been instantly fatal.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 2:49:08 PM PST
KinksRock says:
Tad died at 18, after his father. As far as Lincoln would have known, two of his children made it to adulthood. Nonetheless, it is amazing how strong he was to continue being such a great president after losing Willie while in office. Mary obviously never recovered (I don't think she ever went back into the Blue Room, where Willie's coffin and body were before the funeral). A later president, Calvin Coolidge, lost a child while he was president (from a toe that got infected from a minor tennis injury), and supposedly he was never the same again.

Before his death, Lincoln told Mary that they had been sad to long, and it was time to change. He didn't get the chance. I get angry all over again whenever I read or talk about his assassination.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 3:12:22 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 20, 2012 3:16:33 PM PST
Hikari says:
I've always been fascinated by this President. I remember going to the movies by myself to see 'The Lincoln Conspiracy'. My mom had to drop me off and pick me up because it was 1977 and I was 11 years old. John Anderson played Lincoln. I remember crying over that film, and I hope that Mr. Smith will not regard those as merely 'sentimental' tears. Every American and I think every human being period, should grieve the senseless loss by violence of a great man. We would not be the country we are today without his influence.

In time, I have come to accept his death as sort of a blessing in disguise. Shocking, yes, horrific, yes. But the President was a very ill man, unbeknownst to most Americans, with a disease that would have eventually resulted in increasing incapacitation, pain and probably death. Despite his renewed hope for change in his personal happiness, that prospect looked bleak, with his children dead, his wife gone 'round the bend with mental illness, the country torn apart and at least half of it hating his guts. A second term might have broken him, certainly diminished him in history's eyes, with the Reconstruction debacle & his own personal woes. By being taken from us early, he transcended human politics and entered into the realm of an American legend.

I take comfort in my belief that Lincoln was not conscious to suffer in agony and is enjoying that peace now which eluded him during his lifetime; that after Booth's bullet had done its terrible work, leaving a nation to mourn, Abraham himself heard, "Well done, good and faithful servant. Enter into the joy of your master, " there to be reunited with his lost children and others who loved him.

John Wilkes Booth didn't have such an easy death, and I think went on to that other place. Good thing he liked it hot.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 4:17:04 PM PST
Does he kill more vampires in this movie?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012 5:24:48 PM PST
J. Baker says:
No. Yet around 625,000 mortals were killed.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 21, 2012 5:24:01 AM PST
KinksRock says:
I believe that the idea that illness was going to take Lincoln soon after had he not been assassinated is a theory but is not definite. I think some of your other points are debatable. Apparently his death was mourned by many in the South, including some who said they lost a good friend. Many of those left to manage Reconstruction after Lincoln were no friends of the South and were interested in punishment more than reconstruction. Lincoln wanted to bring the Southern states back into the fold. And, of course, Johnson was a disaster and his battles with his enemies likely distracted the country from the issues that needed to be addressed.

Lincoln may not have been sanctified had he finish a second term, but I believe he would have still been viewed as one of the greats.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 21, 2012 8:19:54 AM PST
J.Cooper says:
how about Sally Fields...?

Posted on Nov 21, 2012 12:05:54 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 21, 2012 12:07:27 PM PST
I saw the film and thought it was excellent, but be prepared -- it's a LOT of talking, and centers on the passage of the 13th amendment to the Constitution abolishing slavery. It is NOT a film biography on Lincoln's life.

Daniel Day-Lewis should, once again, have a lock on the Best Actor Oscar. Tommy Lee Jones will probably be nominated for Best Supporting Actor as well.
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  11
Total posts:  28
Initial post:  Nov 9, 2012
Latest post:  Dec 6, 2012

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