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Worst Movies that we've ever seen...


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Posted on Apr 18, 2012 8:57:31 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 18, 2012 8:58:23 AM PDT
Steelers fan says:
Yeah, Judy was on the downside by 1967; she died in 1969. Susan Hayward took over; she died of a brain tumor ("The Conqueror"?) in 1975, I think.

Has anyone here ever seen "The Love Machine", from another Susann novel? It's supposed to be even worse.

Posted on Apr 18, 2012 9:19:47 AM PDT
Kinks: Actually, the Egyptians invented paper--and for that matter, so did the Chinese, I think.

I'm quite certain paper was in use in the 12th century, along with parchment and vellum.

Posted on Apr 18, 2012 9:21:26 AM PDT
Steelers: Garland, typically, showed up for filming, spent most of her time in her trailer, got fired, and walked off with her wardrobe.

I haven't seen The Love Machine--but I want to.

Another bad film, same vintage and type: The Oscar.

Posted on Apr 18, 2012 9:23:23 AM PDT
Steelers fan says:
Yeah. Tony Bennett's foray into acting. Wisely, he returned to what he does best.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 18, 2012 9:26:52 AM PDT
KinksRock says:
I found this in an article: "The original script mentioned Christmas trees, which didn't exist int the 12th century and got cut from the text (as did references to syphillis and pulp paper)." [http://www.sandiegoreader.com/weblogs/out-about/2012/jan/19/lion-in-winter-sure-its-whacko-but-is-it-accurate/]

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 18, 2012 9:29:49 AM PDT
KinksRock says:
This is from imdb: "Henry refers to the lack of value of Eleanor's signature on paper. Paper was a Chinese invention unknown to Europe at this time. The very first paper mills were not founded in Europe until the 13th Century. Instead, parchment was used at this time."

Posted on Apr 18, 2012 9:38:13 AM PDT
Dragon Wars was by far the worst movie. You would think by the title it would have fighting dragons. Instead 3/4 of the movie was about "dragons" (snakes) and some other weird stuff.

Posted on Apr 18, 2012 10:49:38 AM PDT
Kinks: Good point. A quick check indicates paper was made in Spain in the 12th century, but unlikely to be in northern France.

But that is the least of the historical butchery in The Lion in Winter. I do find it entertaining as drama, but appalling in its lack of factual basis.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 18, 2012 10:55:02 AM PDT
D. Larson says:
While I'm not often charitable, I try to be when it comes to child actors. That McCulkin kid did alright, for a slapstick movie role. NOw and again, you see a child actor who isn't annoying or cloying or just plain bad, but for the most part, the old advice is still valid: never work with animals or children.

Anyway, "Home Alone" wasn't good, wasn't that terrible, just wasn't aimed at audiences like me.

Posted on Apr 18, 2012 10:57:55 AM PDT
Green Meanie says:
The Creeping Terror with a menacing quilted over size comforter bedding sheet draped over two people like a Chinese New Year Dragon walking like a slow moving turtle while victims stand still and let them drape the sheets over them to simulate being eaten.

Posted on Apr 18, 2012 11:04:45 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 20, 2012 1:48:01 PM PDT
Steelers fan says:
Yeah; there is a photo from that movie showing kids under "The Creeping Terror", laughing. Teenagers were hired to help the terrifying "Terror" creep along.

Not as bad as poor, drug-addicted Bela Lugosi in E. Wood's "Bride Of The Monster". The octopus thing, or whatever it was, conked out, so Lugosi had to move it himself to make it appear like he was being squeezed to death or something.

By the time he got around to the monster in "Robot Monster", filmmaker Phil Tucker had run out of money. He knew a guy who owned his own gorilla suit, and worked cheap. He got a diving helmet to complete the terrifying effect. He had his monster.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 18, 2012 11:07:01 AM PDT
Balok says:
@D. Larson:

"NOw and again, you see a child actor who isn't annoying or cloying or just plain bad, but for the most part, the old advice is still valid: never work with animals or children."

That reminds me -- when I saw _The Piano_, as we left the theater, I commented to the friend with whom I went to see it that I thought that it was really terrible, but that "that little girl" (Anna Paquin) was going to win an Oscar. 2 for 2.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 18, 2012 11:09:16 AM PDT
KinksRock says:
I had just read Chaucer in college when I saw the movie, so that paper thing jumped out at me. Nonetheless, it is pretty good drama. Fun to see Nigel Terry in a movie other than "Excalibur", in a less heroic role.

Posted on Apr 18, 2012 1:58:36 PM PDT
Kinks: I taught sections of Chaucer (the discussions, not the lectures, which were delivered by a very senior scholar) when I was a graduate student. I still recall some of my sage advice--like how to visualize the Great Vowel Shift, and to just keep sloughing through The Canterbury Tales in Middle English. If you do, by the time you hit The Wife of Bath's Tale, all of a sudden it will all make perfect sense. Don't try and read a modernized version.

And when I was in high school, I held the informal North New Jersey speed record for reciting the first 27 lines of the General Prologue.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 18, 2012 2:05:26 PM PDT
Hikari says:
>>And when I was in high school, I held the informal North New Jersey speed record for reciting the first 27 lines of the General Prologue.

Is this an attempt at some Chaucerian humor, or does such a thing actually exist? In New Joisey, yet. Imagine. I have an image of schoolboy WAS very like the child Spock, presumably without the pointy ears and unflattering bowl haircut. I daresay, for all Spock's brilliance you have him beat at the Great Vowel Shift. What else can we do except take our (metaphorical) hats off to you?

Posted on Apr 18, 2012 2:18:26 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 18, 2012 2:22:19 PM PDT
Hikari: I did say informal...

And do not speak slightingly of Spock. Without doubt, he was quite familiar with that seismic event in the history of English. And he sports quite a stylish, if idiosyncratic, haircut.

Nor yet speak slightingly of New Jersey, The Garden State, The Battleground Of The Revolution, and the home of Meryl Streep and Bruce Springsteen. Not to mention the home of Princeton University.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 18, 2012 2:28:59 PM PDT
Hikari says:
Ah, are we to infer that by 'informal' that the field of contestants was really small--you and a couple of your buddies from the Chaucer club? Allrighty then.

I might have enjoyed my Chaucer course better if the professor hadn't been so uninvested in the material. He was very elderly and basically refused to retire. He looked the part of a college professor of Chaucer but he didn't actually teach it. He just left us to muddle through as best as we could. I was required to take this course for my teaching degree, otherwise I would not have, since this prof was legendarily boring. I do recall writing a paper on the history of medieval Christmas carols that I actually rather enjoyed. Still now the ancient ones are my favorites.

I attribute Spock's perfectly symmetical Dutch boy look to genetics, not hairstyling--all the Vulcans (Vulcanari?) sport the same look, so it is not idiosyncratic at all, but more like a racial trait. I think everyone comes out at birth with that hairstyle and it just stays like that forever, making barbershop appointments unnecessary. How lucky for Spock. I should have had a haircut 2 months ago and haven't done it yet.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 18, 2012 9:47:17 PM PDT
Just Duckie says:
Agree with L. Housley. I tried 3 times to get to the end and fell asleep every time! Though, I really enjoyed the book.

Posted on Apr 19, 2012 6:47:53 AM PDT
Steelers fan says:
He lete a farte as grete as it had bene a thunder-dente.

--The Miller's Tale

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 19, 2012 9:00:21 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 19, 2012 9:10:41 AM PDT
Hikari: Snarky. Chaucer club?

Chaucer is one of the great narrative poets in English--and few poets are more important from an historical point of view. One of the pinnacles of English medieval literature, along with the Gawain poet. It's a pity that the language of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is so difficult (a very different dialect from Chaucer's). I first read it in Borroff's translation, which is very good; I still have my copy of the Tolkien edition of the original from grad school with a full interlinear translation penciled in. But no translation can give you the full force of its alliterative style.

Curiously, when I was in England, I started attending a course of lectures on Sir Gawain and the Green Knight by J.A.W. Bennett. It takes genius of a high order to be as massively boring as he was. Didn't put me off the poem, however.

It's curious--which ancient carols?
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Movie forum
Participants:  79
Total posts:  470
Initial post:  Apr 3, 2012
Latest post:  Apr 19, 2012

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